Search Results for the-vanishing-vision

Title: The vanishing vision. HE87oo.79.U6D39 1995 384.55'o65—dczo 944; Printed in the United States of America 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of American National Standard for ...

Author: James Day

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 9780520302372

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 474

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This spirited history of public television offers an insider's account of its topsy-turvy forty-year odyssey. James Day, a founder of San Francisco's KQED and a past president of New York's WNET, provides a vivid and often amusing behind-the-screens history. Day tells how a program producer, desperate to locate a family willing to live with television cameras for seven months, borrowed a dime—and a suggestion—from a blind date and telephoned the Louds of Santa Barbara. The result was the mesmerizing twelve-hour documentary An American Family. Day relates how Big Bird and his friends were created to spice up Sesame Street when test runs showed a flagging interest in the program's "live-action" segments. And he describes how Frieda Hennock, the first woman appointed to the FCC, overpowered the resistance of her male colleagues to lay the foundation for public television. Day identifies the particular forces that have shaped public television and produced a Byzantine bureaucracy kept on a leash by an untrusting Congress, with a fragmented leadership that lacks a clearly defined mission in today's multimedia environment. Day calls for a bold rethinking of public television's mission, advocating a system that is adequately funded, independent of government, and capable of countering commercial television's "lowest-common-denominator" approach with a full range of substantive programs, comedy as well as culture, entertainment as well as information. This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1995.
2021-01-08 By James Day

Bill Moyers, interview by author, New York, November 29, 2005; Day, Vanishing Vision, 112; John McLaughlin, “PBL's Premiere,” America, November 18, 1967, 621–22. Michael Arlen, “The Air: Something Live,” New Yorker, December 30, ...

Author: Ralph Engelman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231510202

Category: History

Page: 440

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Fred Friendly (1915-1998) was the single most important personality in news and public affairs programming during the first four decades of American television. Portrayed by George Clooney in the film Good Night and Good Luck, Friendly, together with Edward R. Murrow, invented the television documentary format and subsequently oversaw the birth of public television. Juggling the roles of producer, policy maker, and teacher, Friendly had an unprecedented impact on the development of CBS in its heyday, wielded extensive influence at the Ford Foundation under the presidency of McGeorge Bundy, and trained a generation of journalists at Columbia University during a tumultuous period of student revolt. Ralph Engelman's biography is the first comprehensive account of Friendly's life and work. Known as a "brilliant monster," Friendly stood at the center of television's unique response to McCarthyism, Watergate, and the Vietnam War, and the pitched battles he fought continue to resonate in the troubled world of television news. Engelman's fascinating psychological portrait explores the sources of Friendly's legendary rage and his extraordinary achievement. Drawing on private papers and interviews with colleagues, family members, and friends, Friendlyvision is the definitive story of broadcast journalism's infamous "wild man," providing a crucial perspective on the past and future character of American journalism.
2009-04-24 By Ralph Engelman

For a more detailed account focusing on television, see James Day, The Vanishing Vision: The Inside Story of Public Television (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995). On Omnibus, see Einstein, Special Edition; and “Omnibus,” ...

Author: Charles L. Ponce de Leon

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226421520

Category: History

Page: 352

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Ever since Newton Minow taught us sophisticates to bemoan the descent of television into a vast wasteland, the dyspeptic chorus of jeremiahs who insist that television news in particular has gone from gold to dross gets noisier and noisier. Charles Ponce de Leon says here, in effect, that this is misleading, if not simply fatuous. He argues in this well-paced, lively, readable book that TV news has changed in response to broader changes in the TV industry and American culture. It is pointless to bewail its "decline.” That’s the Way It Is gives us the very first history of American television news, spanning more than six decades, from "Camel News Caravan” to "Countdown with Keith Oberman” and "The Daily Show.” Starting in the latter 1940s, television news featured a succession of broadcasters who became household names, even presences: Eric Sevareid, Walter Cronkite, David Brinkley, Peter Jennings, Brian Williams, Katie Couric, and, with cable expansion, people like Glenn Beck, Jon Stewart, and Bill O’Reilly. But behind the scenes, the parallel story is just as interesting, involving executives, producers, and journalists who were responsible for the field’s most important innovations. Included with mainstream network news programs is an engaging treatment of news magazines like 60 Minutes and 20/20, as well as morning news shows like Today and Good Morning America. Ponce de Leon gives ample attention to the establishment of cable networks (CNN, and the later competitors, Fox News and MSNBC), mixing in colorful anecdotes about the likes of Roger Ailes and Roone Arledge. Frothy features and other kinds of entertainment have been part and parcel of TV news from the start; viewer preferences have always played a role in the evolution of programming, although the disintegration of a national culture since the 1970s means that most of us no longer follow the news as a civic obligation. Throughout, Ponce de Leon places his history in a broader cultural context, emphasizing tensions between the "public service” mission of TV news and the quest for profitability and broad appeal.
2016-09-09 By Charles L. Ponce de Leon

Author: Harry Conn

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:84414391

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1951 By Harry Conn

Problem 9 , -Find , and mark , the vanishing point for lines vanishing to the right at angles of 50 ° with the Picture ... Now as the Centre of Vision , when it is Vanishing Point , has its special Measuring Point , so every Vanishing ...

Author: Henry Hodge

Publisher:

ISBN: OXFORD:590492301

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Page:

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1872 By Henry Hodge

either side of the centre of vision , equar to the distance of the eye in front of the picture - plane . If we imagine the principal visual ray to revolve in the vanishing plane upon the centre of vision as centre , the station point ...

Author: Henry James Dennis

Publisher:

ISBN: OXFORD:590296143

Category:

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The Distance points are therefore called the Measuring points of lines vanishing in the centre of Vision , that is , which are right angles to the Picture plane . The Measuring point is then the distance of the Vanishing point from the ...

Author: Arthur Owen

Publisher:

ISBN: OXFORD:590741718

Category:

Page:

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1870 By Arthur Owen

... which requires that each view shall have its own measuring point , as shown . These two posts are so placed that all retreating lines are parallel to the P L V , therefore but one vanishing point is required for both .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: NYPL:33433071604452

Category: Architecture

Page:

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1896 By

process of swift transition , I shall endeavour to catch and hold for the interest of my readers the vanishing vision of the old , as well as to present the growing vision of the new , which I was permitted to witness during a residence ...

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ISBN: MINN:319510007342163

Category: Methodist Church

Page:

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1880 By

Vanishing Line of a Surface Suppose a surface S has gradient Gs . For any vector L on S with gradient G. Gs = -1 , as shown in section 7 . Since the vanishing point of L is V = - G ( by corollary 1 of section 9 ) , G E 4.

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ISBN: UOM:39015002934316

Category: Computer vision

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1982 By