Search Results for the-student-aid-game

various sources and changes in universities ' and colleges ' financial behavior . The analysis focused on explaining three financial variables over which institutions have control : their spending per student on institution - based aid ...

Author: Michael McPherson

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691230917

Category: Education

Page: 176

View: 142

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Student aid in higher education has recently become a hot-button issue. Parents trying to pay for their children's education, college administrators competing for students, and even President Bill Clinton, whose recently proposed tax breaks for college would change sharply the federal government's financial commitment to higher education, have staked a claim in its resolution. In The Student Aid Game, Michael McPherson and Morton Owen Schapiro explain how both colleges and governments are struggling to cope with a rapidly changing marketplace, and show how sound policies can help preserve the strengths and remedy some emerging weaknesses of American higher education. McPherson and Schapiro offer a detailed look at how undergraduate education is financed in the United States, highlighting differences across sectors and for students of differing family backgrounds. They review the implications of recent financing trends for access to and choice of undergraduate college and gauge the implications of these national trends for the future of college opportunity. The authors examine how student aid fits into college budgets, how aid and pricing decisions are shaped by government higher education policies, and how competition has radically reshaped the way colleges think about the strategic role of student aid. Of particular interest is the issue of merit aid. McPherson and Schapiro consider the attractions and pitfalls of merit aid from the viewpoint of students, institutions, and society. The Student Aid Game concludes with an examination of policy options for both government and individual institutions. McPherson and Schapiro argue that the federal government needs to keep its attention focused on providing access to college for needy students, while colleges themselves need to constrain their search for strategic advantage by sticking to aid and admission policies they are willing to articulate and defend publicly.
2021-05-11 By Michael McPherson

"This is a wonderful book.

Author: Michael S. McPherson

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691005362

Category: Education

Page: 176

View: 339

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Student aid in higher education has recently become a hot-button issue. Parents trying to pay for their children's education, college administrators competing for students, and even President Bill Clinton, whose recently proposed tax breaks for college would change sharply the federal government's financial commitment to higher education, have staked a claim in its resolution. In The Student Aid Game, Michael McPherson and Morton Owen Schapiro explain how both colleges and governments are struggling to cope with a rapidly changing marketplace, and show how sound policies can help preserve the strengths and remedy some emerging weaknesses of American higher education. McPherson and Schapiro offer a detailed look at how undergraduate education is financed in the United States, highlighting differences across sectors and for students of differing family backgrounds. They review the implications of recent financing trends for access to and choice of undergraduate college and gauge the implications of these national trends for the future of college opportunity. The authors examine how student aid fits into college budgets, how aid and pricing decisions are shaped by government higher education policies, and how competition has radically reshaped the way colleges think about the strategic role of student aid. Of particular interest is the issue of merit aid. McPherson and Schapiro consider the attractions and pitfalls of merit aid from the viewpoint of students, institutions, and society. The Student Aid Game concludes with an examination of policy options for both government and individual institutions. McPherson and Schapiro argue that the federal government needs to keep its attention focused on providing access to college for needy students, while colleges themselves need to constrain their search for strategic advantage by sticking to aid and admission policies they are willing to articulate and defend publicly.
1999-01-03 By Michael S. McPherson

McPherson and Schapiro, The Student Aid Game, p. 30. 13. AAUP website. “Increasing Pell Grants by $1000 in a given semester decreased the drop-out rates among African American students by 7 percent and among Hispanic American students ...

Author: Robert K. Fullinwider

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9781461638827

Category: Philosophy

Page: 280

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Leveling the Playing Field examines the admissions policies of contemporary American colleges and universities in light of the assumption that enhancing the educational opportunities of lower-income and minority students would make American society more just. It asks how current admissions policies affect the prospects of such students, and it evaluates alternative approaches. The book treats a variety of topics relevant to answering these questions. What does it mean to reward people according to merit? Is the American system of higher education a meritocracy, and should it be? How do the missions of contemporary institutions of higher education bear on admissions? What are the implications of the Supreme Court's landmark affirmative action decisions of 2003? What is the proper role and significance of standardized tests like the SAT? How does 'lower' education prepare students, or fail to, for higher education? In answering these questions, the book examines legacy preference, early admissions policies, financial aid, the test-prep industry, college counseling, and athletics, evaluating their effects on the distribution of higher education in the United States, not only for lower-income and minority students but for college-bound students in general.
2004-03-19 By Robert K. Fullinwider

The student aid game: Meeting need and rewarding talent in American higher education. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Meek, V. L., (St Goedegebuure, L. C. J. (1989). Higher education: A rePort. Armidale, Australia: Dept. of ...

Author: Baoyan Cheng

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739145524

Category: Education

Page: 168

View: 605

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Providing the most updated information on the current financial aid system, especially the Government-subsidized Student Loan Program, in China, this book employs a multi-perspective approach to studying this loan program. Adopting an interdisciplinary framework, the book goes beyond examining the technical aspects of setting up a student loan program; it puts the loan program in a larger context of social stratification, equality and social justice.
2011-03-24 By Baoyan Cheng

Facilitating and applying research in student financial aid to institutional objectives. In R. H. Fenske, (Ed.), Studying the impact of student ... The student aid game: Meeting need and rewarding talent in American higher education.

Author: Audrey L. Rentz

Publisher: Charles C Thomas Publisher

ISBN: 9780398074685

Category: Education

Page: 422

View: 512

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Students in the field, as well as experienced practitioners and administrators, will herein find an up-to-date and in-depth study of the major student affairs functions of a comprehensive campus program. Within its covers, the graduate student will find chapters describing everything the person new to student affairs needs to know about the major service functions of the modern student affairs division. Student affairs administrators will find the fourteen chapters in this book very helpful in furthering their understanding of the major functions in the field. It will also be useful in helping the chief student affairs officer to articulate the needs of the various programs in an understandable and persuasive manner in order to convince others outside of student affairs that the policies and programs they propose are worthy of support. The first two chapters, thoughtfully revised from the previous edition of the book, provide the philosophical and historical tools to clarify assumptions, values and concerns. The enrollment management chapters on admissions, financial aid, academic advising, and orientation interweave conceptually into one package loosely constructed at one institution and tightly constructed at others. Residence life, orientation, judicial affairs, career services, student activities, financial aid and multicultural affairs provide an interesting, united focus on learning and living skills. Counseling, career services, and health services help focus on an integrated, wellness orientation to life. The final chapter of the book examines three central issues (social justice, student learning, and professionalism) that typify the current challenges facing our continually evolving profession and higher education. For staff who want to read further, there are up-to-date references at the end of each chapter. Student affairs administrators have the responsibility of providing the best programs and services they can for the
2004 By Audrey L. Rentz

How Government-Guaranteed Loans Left Generations Drowning in College Debt Elizabeth Tandy Shermer ... Hannah, “Higher Education Act of 1992,” 508–509; Michael S. McPherson and Morton Owen Schapiro, The Student Aid Game: Meeting Need and ...

Author: Elizabeth Tandy Shermer

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674251489

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 118

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The untold history of how AmericaÕs student-loan program turned the pursuit of higher education into a pathway to poverty. It didnÕt always take thirty years to pay off the cost of a bachelorÕs degree. Elizabeth Tandy Shermer untangles the history that brought us here and discovers that the story of skyrocketing college debt is not merely one of good intentions gone wrong. In fact, the federal student loan program was never supposed to make college affordable. The earliest federal proposals for college affordability sought to replace tuition with taxpayer funding of institutions. But Southern whites feared that lower costs would undermine segregation, Catholic colleges objected to state support of secular institutions, professors worried that federal dollars would come with regulations hindering academic freedom, and elite-university presidents recoiled at the idea of mass higher education. Cold War congressional fights eventually made access more important than affordability. Rather than freeing colleges from their dependence on tuition, the government created a loan instrument that made college accessible in the short term but even costlier in the long term by charging an interest penalty only to needy students. In the mid-1960s, as bankers wavered over the prospect of uncollected debt, Congress backstopped the loans, provoking runaway inflation in college tuition and resulting in immense lender profits. Today 45 million Americans owe more than $1.5 trillion in college debt, with the burdens falling disproportionately on borrowers of color, particularly women. Reformers, meanwhile, have been frustrated by colleges and lenders too rich and powerful to contain. Indentured Students makes clear that these are not unforeseen consequences. The federal student loan system is working as designed.
2021-08-03 By Elizabeth Tandy Shermer

evident until the student makes some effort to determine his or her award. Low-income students might assume the price of attendance is too high because of the posted tuition without ever finding out about the available student aid.4 ...

Author:

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 9781428964969

Category:

Page:

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Cf. McPherson and Schapiro , The Student Aid Game ( 1998 ) , 371 , table . Some states have reciprocal agreements letting some or all of their aid be taken to partner states . Since 2000 , the federal and state proportions of need ...

Author: Rupert Wilkinson

Publisher: Vanderbilt University Press

ISBN: 0826515029

Category: EDUCATION

Page: 346

View: 775

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Wilkinson traces the history of undergraduate financial aid at American colleges and universities; the origins, purposes, and impacts of merit- and need-based aid; the federal government's role; the evolution of elite private institutions; and the current climate and concerns. The concluding chapter lays out how these factors, combined with increasing costs of attending college, impact low-income minority students and how reforms on campuses and in Washington, DC, can better serve higher education and the more disadvantaged students.

Chapter 14 Student Aid 1. Michael S. McPherson and Morton Owen Schapiro , “ Gaining Control of the Free - for - All in Financial Aid , ” Chronicle of Higher Education , July 2 , 1999 , p . A48 . The omitted portion of this quotation ...

Author: Henry N. Drewry

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691049009

Category: Education

Page: 335

View: 952

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Presents a history of black colleges and universities in the United States.
2001 By Henry N. Drewry

The Effects of Antitrust Action on College Financial Aid and Tuition" (Harvard University, Department of Economics, ... As described in Michael S. McPherson and Morton Owen Schapiro, The Student Aid Game (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton ...

Author: Roger L. Geiger

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804749268

Category: Education

Page: 321

View: 437

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This book explains how market forces are profoundly affecting finance, undergraduate education, basic research, and participation in regional and national economic development at American universities.
2004 By Roger L. Geiger