Search Results for the-music-hall-portsmouth

On January 29 , 1878 , the Honorable W.H.Y. Hackett , mayor of Portsmouth and father - inlaw of one of the Peirce brothers ... That opening night , a Tuesday , the Music Hall was crowded with the community's finest , a live orchestra ...

Author: Zhana Morris

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738512494

Category: History

Page: 132

View: 154

DOWNLOAD & READ
On Christmas Eve 1876, Portsmouth citizens watched flames reduce their largest meetinghouse and entertainment hall to ashes. During the following year, local families, businessmen, and craftsmen combined their resources to build a new auditorium with state-of-the-art lighting, rigging, staging, and seating-a comfortable venue for public addresses, charity functions, and international entertainment. The Music Hall, Portsmouth, was born. Twain spoke from her stage, Sousa's brass echoed from her walls, and Edison's films brought her silver screen to life. Enduring war, depression, and multiple threats of destruction, this grand hall today stands as New Hampshire's oldest operating theater. Showcasing the world's finest stage and screen talent, offering artistic education to young and old, and hosting fundraisers and private events, the Music Hall is a testament to the necessity of arts in local culture and the strength of a community's resolve.
2003-01-01 By Zhana Morris

76 Sloman, Charles 3, 11, 122 Smithson, Florence 226 'Soldiers of the Queen' 204, 206 'Song of Songs, The' 26 South London Palace 89, 121–3 South of England music hall, Portsmouth 121 South Shields, Tyne and Wear: Empire Palace 70 ...

Author: Richard Anthony Baker

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781783831180

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 212

DOWNLOAD & READ
The music hall ...had no place for reticence; it was downright, it shouted, it made noise, it enjoyed itself and made the people enjoy themselves as well.' W.J. MACQUEEN POPE??Music Hall lies at the root of all modern popular entertainment. With stars such as Marie Lloyd, Harry Lauder and Dan Leno, it reached its glorious, brassy height between 1890 and the First World War. In the first book on this subject for many years, Richard Anthony Baker whisks us off on a colourful and nostalgic tour of the rise and fall of British music hall.??At the beginning of the nineteenth century people sang traditional songs in taverns for entertainment. This was so popular that rooms started to be added to inns for shows to be staged, and, before long, songs were being specially composed and purpose-built theatres were springing up everywhere. ??Britain's working class had, for the first time, its own form of public entertainment and its own breed of stars. The colour and vitality attracted serious writers and artists, as well as the future Edward VII, and music hall became simultaneously the haunt of the working classes and the avant-garde.??Including stories of a clergyman who wrote music-hall sketches, a hall in Glasgow where luckless entertainers were pulled off stage by a long hooked pole, and Cockney dictionaries that helped Americans understand touring British performers, this book is a hugely engaging slice of social history, rich in humour, tragedy and bathos.??As featured on BBC Radio Lincolnshire and in the Sunderland Echo.
2014-05-31 By Richard Anthony Baker

By March 1883 17-year-old 'Lillie Harley' was appearing as a solo act at the Royal Amphitheatre music hall, Gun Wharf Road, Portsmouth. A career on the music-hall stage was certainly more lucrative and eventful than machining capes, ...

Author: Barry Anthony

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781786733856

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 294

DOWNLOAD & READ
Charlie Chaplin grew up in and around the music hall. His parents, aunt and their friends all earned their precarious livings on the stage and Chaplin himself started out his career touring music halls with a dance troupe. His experiences of the culture of the music hall were a major influence, shaping his style of acting and the films he made, most famously Limelight, which tells the story of a failing variety performer and which evoked painful memories of his own past. Chaplin was horrified to see how performers' lives were ruined when their audience turned against them and he was relieved to exchange the stresses of live performance for screen comedy. Barry Anthony here tells the story of the lives and careers of Chaplin's family and their music-hall circle - from 'dashing' Eva Lester to the great Fred Karno and from Chaplin's parents Hannah Hill and Charles Chaplin to 'The Great Calvero' himself. He reveals the difficult and often-tragic lives of London's variety community in the late-Victorian and Edwardian years, a time of great change in the music hall and entertainment scene, and in doing so sheds important new light on the inspiration behind Chaplin's genius, providing a fascinatingly fresh perspective on this popular cultural icon of the twentieth century.
2012-09-30 By Barry Anthony

The Music Hall, Portsmouth, was born. Twain spoke from her stage, Sousa's brass echoed from her walls, and Edison's films brought her silver screen to life.

Author: Zhana Morris

Publisher: Arcadia Library Editions

ISBN: 1531608396

Category: History

Page: 130

View: 392

DOWNLOAD & READ
On Christmas Eve 1876, Portsmouth citizens watched flames reduce their largest meetinghouse and entertainment hall to ashes. During the following year, local families, businessmen, and craftsmen combined their resources to build a new auditorium with state-of-the-art lighting, rigging, staging, and seating-a comfortable venue for public addresses, charity functions, and international entertainment. The Music Hall, Portsmouth, was born. Twain spoke from her stage, Sousa's brass echoed from her walls, and Edison's films brought her silver screen to life. Enduring war, depression, and multiple threats of destruction, this grand hall today stands as New Hampshire's oldest operating theater. Showcasing the world's finest stage and screen talent, offering artistic education to young and old, and hosting fundraisers and private events, the Music Hall is a testament to the necessity of arts in local culture and the strength of a community's resolve.
2003-07 By Zhana Morris

Dwyer was president of the board of trustees of the Music Hall, an organization in Portsmouth that presents “live and cinematic arts.” Early in 1994, she decided that the Music Hall should propose a shipyard arts project to the Lila ...

Author: Robert D. Putnam

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439106884

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 414

DOWNLOAD & READ
In his acclaimed bestselling book, Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, Robert Putnam described a thirty-year decline in America's social institutions. The book ended with the hope that new forms of social connection might be invented in order to revive our communities. In Better Together, Putnam and longtime civic activist Lewis Feldstein describe some of the diverse locations and most compelling ways in which civic renewal is taking place today. In response to civic crises and local problems, they say, hardworking, committed people are reweaving the social fabric all across America, often in innovative ways that may turn out to be appropriate for the twenty-first century. Better Together is a book of stories about people who are building communities to solve specific problems. The examples Putnam and Feldstein describe span the country from big cities such as Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Chicago to the Los Angeles suburbs, small Mississippi and Wisconsin towns, and quiet rural areas. The projects range from the strictly local to that of the men and women of UPS, who cover the nation. Bowling Alone looked at America from a broad and general perspective. Better Together takes us into Catherine Flannery's Roxbury, Massachusetts, living room, a UPS loading dock in Greensboro, North Carolina, a Philadelphia classroom, the Portsmouth, New Hampshire, naval shipyard, and a Bay Area Web site. We meet activists driven by their visions, each of whom has chosen to succeed by building community: Mexican Americans in the Rio Grande Valley who want paved roads, running water, and decent schools; Harvard University clerical workers searching for respect and improved working conditions; Waupun, Wisconsin, schoolchildren organizing to improve safety at a local railroad crossing; and merchants in Tupelo, Mississippi, joining with farmers to improve their economic status. As the stories in Better Together demonstrate, bringing people together by building on personal relationships remains one of the most effective strategies to enhance America's social health.
2009-12-01 By Robert D. Putnam

For years Drika had worked at the Music Hall in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and was an original board member involved in the efforts to save it when it was slated for condos. I had been the house manager, worked the box office, ...

Author:

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415938532

Category: Entertainers

Page: 639

View: 651

DOWNLOAD & READ
2004 By

The employees of the Music Hall speak of a large cold spot—an area where the temperature drops dramatically, as if a cold, dead soul is standing beside you. They claim to have researched any heating and ventilation concerns and have ...

Author: Roxie J. Zwicker

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781625844828

Category: History

Page: 251

View: 362

DOWNLOAD & READ
New Hampshire’s historic port town is no stranger to ghostly goings-on—from the local TV personality and author of Massachusetts Book of the Dead. A tour of Portsmouth’s back alleys and docksides, filled with the lingering whispers and memories of generations long dead. Venture through the haunted past and present of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, if you dare. Before Portsmouth was a charming seaside community, it was a rough-and-tumble seaport. Hear phantom footsteps in the Point of Pines Burial Ground and mysterious voices at the Portsmouth Harbor Lighthouse, haunted by the ghost of its former keeper. Tour guide and hauntings expert Roxie Zwicker takes readers on a tour of the nation’s third-oldest city, where buildings and street corners teem with ghostly stories and legends. Includes photos!
2019-08-19 By Roxie J. Zwicker

He was not the only manager of a music hall to fall foul of such complaints . ... Portsmouth ( 1865 ) , Birkenhead ( 1872 ) and Birmingham ( 1881 ) .58 In Youdan's case , however , this was not his first breach of the Theatres Act nor ...

Author: Dagmar Kift

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521474728

Category: Drama

Page: 244

View: 647

DOWNLOAD & READ
With the exception of the occasional local case study, music-hall history has until now been presented as the history of the London halls. This book attempts to redress the balance by setting music-hall history within a national perspective. Kift also sheds a new light on the roles of managements, performers and audiences. For example, the author confutes the commonly held assumption that most women in the halls were prostitutes and shows them to have been working women accompanied by workmates of both sexes or by their families. She argues that before the 1890s the halls catered predominantly to working-class and lower middle-class audiences of men and women of all ages and were instrumental in giving them a strong and self-confident identity. The hall's ability to sustain a distinct class-awareness was one of their greatest strengths - but this factor was also at the root of many of the controversies which surrounded them. These controversies are at the centre of the book and Kift treats them as test cases for social relations which provide fresh insights into nineteenth-century British society and politics.
1996-10-24 By Dagmar Kift

Portsmouth's Music Hall, a 906-seat Victorian theater, is the oldest operating theater in the state, and the fourteenth-oldest in the United States. It's seen its share of impressive names tromp the boards, including luminaries ranging ...

Author: Matthew P. Mayo

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780762786305

Category: History

Page: 112

View: 243

DOWNLOAD & READ
New Hampshire literally has something for everyone: urban types looking for bookstores, coffee shops, swank eateries, and nightclubs; outdoorsy folks searching for endless vistas atop the high peaks of the White Mountains; history buffs seeking clues to the state’s rich past; or snow-loving families hoping to schuss the slopes all day long. It is a place of quaint villages, swimming holes, general stores, and hillside farms. And its people, those singular Granite Staters, are the friendly caretakers who make sure it’s there for all to enjoy. Profiled within these pages are fifty classic symbols of this extraordinary state, revealing little-known facts, longtime secrets, and historical legends. From frost heaves to Robert Frost, from Stonyfield Yogurt to the New Hampshire State House, New Hampshire Icons offers up the inside story on the Granite State. Did you know that New Hampshire has the shortest coastline of any state (18 miles)? That Mt. Washington is the official home of the world’s worst weather? That pumpkins are the official state fruit? New Hampshire Icons features the people, places, events, foods, animals, and traditions that make it the singular state it is.
2012-07-03 By Matthew P. Mayo

Date (1860–1861) Venue Programme Carol, Trial Carol,. Birmingham, Music Hall Birmingham, Music Hall Portsmouth, St George's Hall Portsmouth, St George's Hall London, St. Appendix 273.

Author: Malcolm Andrews

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191533716

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 346

View: 163

DOWNLOAD & READ
Charles Dickens had three professional careers: novelist, journalist and public Reader. That third career has seldom been given the serious attention it deserved. For the last 12 years of his life he toured Britain and America giving 2-hour readings from his work to audiences of over two thousand. These readings were highly dramatic performances in which Dickens's great gift for mimicry enabled him to represent the looks and voices of his characters, to the point where audiences forgot they were watching Charles Dickens. His novels came alive on the platform: at the end of a reading, it seemed to many that a whole society had broken up rather than that a solitary recitalist had concluded. This book tries to recreate, in greater detail than hitherto, the sense of how those readings were performed and how they were received, how Dickens devised his stage set and tailored his books to make them into performance scripts, how he conducted his reading tours all around the country and developed a quite extraordinary rapport with his listeners. No single study of this late career of Dickens has drawn to such an extent on contemporary witnesses to the readings as well as tried to assess in some depth the significance of what Dickens called 'this new expression of the meaning of my books'. 'I shall tear myself to pieces', he said as he waited eagerly to go on stage for his performance, and that is ironically what he did, in ways he perhaps had not quite intended: he fractured into dozens of different characters up there on the platform, and as he thus tore himself to pieces his health collapsed irretrievably under the pressures he put upon himself to achieve these masterly illusions.
2006-10-26 By Malcolm Andrews