Search Results for the-life-and-afterlives-of-hanabusa-itcho-artist-rebel-of-edo

"Miriam Wattles recounts the making of Hanabusa Itchō (1652-1724), painter, haikai-poet, singer-songwriter, and artist subversive, in The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itchō, Artist-Rebel of Edo.

Author: Miriam Wattles

Publisher: Japanese Visual Culture

ISBN: 9004202854

Category: Art

Page: 288

View: 508

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"Miriam Wattles recounts the making of Hanabusa Itchō (1652-1724), painter, haikai-poet, singer-songwriter, and artist subversive, in The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itchō, Artist-Rebel of Edo. Translating literary motifs visually to encapsulate the tensions of his time, many of Itchō’s original works became models emulated by ukiyo-e and other artists. A wide array of sources reveals a lifetime of multiple personas and positions that are the source of his multifarious artistic reincarnations. While, on the one hand, his legend as seditious exile appears in the fictional cross-media worlds of theater, novels, and prints, on the other hand, factual accounts of his complicated artistic life reveal an important figure within the first artists’ biographies of early modern Japan." --Publisher.
2013 By Miriam Wattles

In The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itchō, Miriam Wattles reveals many facets of a forgotten artist of the Edo period. Infamous for being exiled, in later generations he became a symbol for a subtly subversive potential for art.

Author: Miriam Wattles

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004259171

Category: Art

Page: 288

View: 617

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In The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itchō, Miriam Wattles reveals many facets of a forgotten artist of the Edo period. Infamous for being exiled, in later generations he became a symbol for a subtly subversive potential for art.
2013-10-18 By Miriam Wattles

Petra Rösch, curator of Asian art at Museum für Ostasiatische Kunst der Stadt Köln, explained that the painting ... See Miriam Wattles, The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itchó, Artist-Rebel of Edo (Leiden: Brill, 2013), 78–85, fig.

Author: Sherry D. Fowler

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824856229

Category: Religion

Page: 440

View: 229

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Buddhists around the world celebrate the benefits of worshipping Kannon (Avalokiteśvara), a compassionate savior who is one of the most beloved in the Buddhist pantheon. When Kannon appears in multiple manifestations, the deity’s powers are believed to increase to even greater heights. This concept generated several cults throughout history: among the most significant is the cult of the Six Kannon, which began in Japan in the tenth century and remained prominent through the sixteenth century. In this ambitious work, Sherry Fowler examines the development of the Japanese Six Kannon cult, its sculptures and paintings, and its transition to the Thirty-three Kannon cult, which remains active to this day. An exemplar of Six Kannon imagery is the complete set of life-size wooden sculptures made in 1224 and housed at the Kyoto temple Daihōonji. This set, along with others, is analyzed to demonstrate how Six Kannon worship impacted Buddhist practice. Employing a diachronic approach, Fowler presents case studies beginning in the eleventh century to reinstate a context for sets of Six Kannon, the majority of which have been lost or scattered, and thus illuminates the vibrancy, magnitude, and distribution of the cult and enhances our knowledge of religious image-making in Japan. Kannon’s role in assisting beings trapped in the six paths of transmigration is a well-documented catalyst for the selection of the number six, but there are other significant themes at work. Six Kannon worship includes significant foci on worldly concerns such as childbirth and animal husbandry, ties between text and image, and numerous correlations with Shinto kami groups of six. While making groups of Kannon visible, Fowler explores the fluidity of numerical deity categorizations and the attempts to quantify the invisible. Moreover, her investigation reveals Kyushu as an especially active site in the history of the Six Kannon cult. Much as Kannon images once functioned to attract worshippers, their presentation in this book will entice contemporary readers to revisit their assumptions about East Asia’s most popular Buddhist deity.
2016-11-30 By Sherry D. Fowler

Artistic Collaboration and the Ukiyo-e Market Julie Nelson Davis. ——— . “Production Constraints in the World of ... The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itchō: Artist-Rebel of Edo. Amsterdam: Brill, 2013. Yamaguchi Keizaburō, ed.

Author: Julie Nelson Davis

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824854409

Category: Art

Page: 264

View: 270

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This compelling account of collaboration in the genre of ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) offers a new approach to understanding the production and reception of print culture in early modern Japan. It provides a corrective to the perception that the ukiyo-e tradition was the product of the creative talents of individual artists, revealing instead the many identities that made and disseminated printed work. Julie Nelson Davis demonstrates by way of examples from the later eighteenth century that this popular genre was the result of an exchange among publishers, designers, writers, carvers, printers, patrons, buyers, and readers. By recasting these works as examples of a network of commercial and artistic cooperation, she offers a nuanced view of the complexity of this tradition and expands our understanding of the dynamic processes of production, reception, and intention in floating world print culture. Four case studies give evidence of what constituted modes of collaboration among artistic producers in the period. In each case Davis explores a different configuration of collaboration: that between a teacher and a student, two painters and their publishers, a designer and a publisher, and a writer and an illustrator. Each investigates a mode of partnership through a single work: a specially commissioned print, a lavishly illustrated album, a printed handscroll, and an inexpensive illustrated novel. These case studies explore the diversity of printed things in the period ranging from expensive works made for a select circle of connoisseurs to those meant to be sold at a modest price to a large audience. They take up familiar subjects from the floating world—connoisseurship, beauty, sex, and humor—and explore multiple dimensions of inquiry vital to that dynamic culture: the status of art, the evaluation of beauty, the representation of sexuality, and the tension between mind and body. Where earlier studies of woodblock prints have tended to focus on the individual artist, Partners in Print takes the subject a major step forward to a richer picture of the creative process. Placing these works in their period context not only reveals an aesthetic network responsive to and shaped by the desires of consumers in a specific place and time, but also contributes to a larger discussion about the role of art and the place of the material text in the early modern world.
2014-12-31 By Julie Nelson Davis

James C. Y. Watt and Barbara Brennan Ford ( New York : Metropolitan Museum of Art , 1992 ) , 163-73 . 42. ... On Itchō , see Miriam Wattles , The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itcho , Artist Rebel of Edo ( Leiden : Brill , 2013 ) .

Author: Christine M. E. Guth

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520382497

Category: Art

Page: 264

View: 811

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Articles crafted from lacquer, silk, cotton, paper, ceramics, and iron were central to daily life in early modern Japan. They were powerful carriers of knowledge, sociality, and identity, and their facture was a matter of serious concern among makers and consumers alike. In this innovative study, Christine M. E. Guth offers a holistic framework for appreciating the crafts produced in the city and countryside, by celebrity and unknown makers, between the late sixteenth and mid-nineteenth centuries. Her study throws into relief the confluence of often overlooked forces that contributed to Japan’s diverse, dynamic, and aesthetically sophisticated artifactual culture. By bringing into dialogue key issues such as natural resources and their management, media representations, gender and workshop organization, embodied knowledge, and innovation, she invites readers to think about Japanese crafts as emerging from cooperative yet competitive expressive environments involving both human and nonhuman forces. A focus on the material, sociological, physiological, and technical aspects of making practices adds to our understanding of early modern crafts by revealing underlying patterns of thought and action within the wider culture of the times.
2021-11-09 By Christine M. E. Guth

New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1996. Wattles, Miriam. “The 1909 Ryūtō and the Aesthetics of Affectivity.”ArtJournal 55:3 (1996): 48–56. ———. The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itchō, Artist-Rebel of Edo. Leiden: Brill, 2013.

Author: Chelsea Foxwell

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226110806

Category: Art

Page: 281

View: 373

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Introduction. Nihonga and the historical inscription of the modern -- Exhibitions and the making of modern Japanese painting -- In search of images -- The painter and his audiences -- Decadence and the emergence of Nihonga style -- Naturalizing the double reading -- Transmission and the historicity of Nihonga -- Conclusion
2015-07-20 By Chelsea Foxwell

She has published on the history and historiography of Japanese illustrated books, prints, and painting from the Edo through the Meiji period. Her publications include The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itchô, Artist-Rebel of Edo ...

Author: MeliaBelli Bose

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351536561

Category: Art

Page: 372

View: 247

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Women, Gender and Art in Asia, c. 1500?1900 brings women's engagements with art into a pan-Asian dialogue with essays that examine women as artists, commissioners, collectors, and subjects from India, Southeast Asia, Tibet, China, Korea, and Japan, from the sixteenth to the early twentieth century. The artistic media includes painting, sculpture, architecture, textiles, and photography. The book is broadly concerned with four salient questions: How unusual was it for women to engage directly with art? What factors precluded more women from doing so? In what ways did women's artwork or commissions differ from those of men? And, what were the range of meanings for woman as subject matter? The chapters deal with historic individuals about whom there is considerable biographical information. Beyond locating these uncommon women within their socio-cultural milieux, contributors consider the multiple strands that twined to comprise their complex identities, and how these impacted their works of art. In many cases, the woman's status-as wife, mother, widow, ruler, or concubine (and multiple combinations thereof), as well as her religion and lineage-determined the media, style, and content of her art. Women, Gender and Art in Asia, c. 1500?1900 adds to our understanding of works of art, their meanings, and functions.
2017-07-05 By MeliaBelli Bose

The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itchō, Artist-Rebel of Edo. Leiden: Brill, 2013. Winkel, Margarita. Discovering Different Dimensions: Explorations of Culture and History in Early Modern Japan. Leiden: Leiden University, 2004. ———.

Author: Gerald Groemer

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824877170

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 583

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Japanese zuihitsu (essays) offer a treasure trove of information and insights rarely found in any other genre of Japanese writing. Especially during their golden age, the Edo period (1600–1868), zuihitsu treated a great variety of subjects. In the pages of a typical zuihitsu the reader encountered facts and opinions on everything from martial arts to music, food to fashions, dragons to drama—much of it written casually and seemingly without concern for form or order. The seven zuihitsu translated and annotated in this volume date from the early seventeenth to the late nineteenth centuries. Some of the essays are famous while others are less well known, but none have been published in their entirety in any Western language. Following a substantial introduction outlining the development of the genre, “Tales That Come to Mind” is an early seventeenth-century account of Edo kabuki theater and the Yoshiwara “pleasure quarters” penned by a Buddhist monk. “A Record of Seven Offered Treasures,” composed by a retired samurai-monk near the end of the seventeenth century, starts as a treatise on the proper education of youth but ends as a critique of the author’s own life and moral failings. Perhaps the most famous piece in the volume, “Monologue,” was drafted by the renowned Confucianist Dazai Shundai, a keen and insightful observer of life during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Dazai treats, in turn, poetry, the tea ceremony, comic verse, music, theater, and fashion. “Idle Talk of Nagasaki” is an entertaining record of a journey to Nagasaki by a group of Confucianists in the early eighteenth century. In “Kyoto Observed,” a mid-eighteenth-century Edo resident compares the shogun’s and the emperor’s capital in a series of brief vignettes. An 1814 zuihitsu classic written by a physician, “A Dustheap of Discourses” presents another colorful mosaic of topics related to life in Edo. The book closes with “The Breezes of Osaka,” a lively essay by a highly cultured Edo administrator contrasting the food, life, and culture of his hometown with that of Osaka, where he briefly served as mayor in the 1850s.
2018-11-30 By Gerald Groemer

Asakura Shoten. Watanabe Zen'emon. 1748. Chōsen-jin raihei-ki. 3 vols. MS. Kyoto University Museum. See Kyōto-shi Rekishi Shiryōkan, 2010. Wattles, Miriam. 2013. The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itchō, Artist-Rebel of Edo. Vol.

Author: Ron P. Toby

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004393516

Category: Social Science

Page: 424

View: 916

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In Engaging the Other Ronald P. Toby examines new discourses of cultural and ethnic identity and difference in early modern Japan (1550-1850), their articulation in literature, art, performance, law and customs, and their impact on Japanese national identity.
2019-01-28 By Ron P. Toby

Tokyo: Tōkyō Daigaku Shuppankai 東京大学出版会. Wattles, Miriam (2013). The Life and Afterlives of Hanabusa Itchō, Artist-Rebel of Edo. Leiden: Brill. Webb, Herschel (1968). The Japanese Imperial Institution in the Tokugawa Period.

Author: Peter Nosco

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351389617

Category: History

Page: 188

View: 938

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Two of the most commonly alleged features of Japanese society are its homogeneity and its encouragement of conformity, as represented by the saying that the nail that sticks up gets pounded. This volume’s primary goal is to challenge these and a number of other long-standing assumptions regarding Tokugawa (1600-1868) society, and thereby to open a dialogue regarding the relationship between the Japan of two centuries ago and the present. The volume’s central chapters concentrate on six aspects of Tokugawa society: the construction of individual identity, aggressive pursuit of self-interest, defiant practice of forbidden religious traditions, interest in self-cultivation and personal betterment, understandings of happiness and well-being, and embrace of "neglected" counter-ideological values. The author argues that when taken together, these point to far higher degrees of individuality in early modern Japan than has heretofore been acknowledged, and in an Afterword the author briefly examines how these indicators of individuality in early modern Japan are faring in contemporary Japan at the time of writing.
2017-09-13 By Peter Nosco