Search Results for the-food-of-a-younger-land

Uses long-forgotten WPA files archived in the Library of Congress to paint a detailed picture of Depression Era Americans through the food that they ate and the local traditions and customs they observed when preparing meals.

Author: Mark Kurlansky

Publisher: Riverhead Books (Hardcover)

ISBN: 1594484570

Category: Cooking

Page: 451

View: 478

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Uses long-forgotten WPA files archived in the Library of Congress to paint a detailed picture of Depression Era Americans through the food that they ate and the local traditions and customs they observed when preparing meals.
2010 By Mark Kurlansky

A portrait of American food from the lost WPA files Mark Kurlansky. today credit the New Deal with stopping the growth of Communism in the United States. When Henry Alsberg, a native New Yorker, was appointed director of the FWP at the ...

Author: Mark Kurlansky

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101057124

Category: Cooking

Page: 480

View: 975

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Recommended by Chef José Andrés on The Drew Barrymore Show! A remarkable portrait of American food before World War II, presented by the New York Times-bestselling author of Cod and Salt. Award-winning New York Times-bestselling author Mark Kurlansky takes us back to the food and eating habits of a younger America: Before the national highway system brought the country closer together; before chain restaurants imposed uniformity and low quality; and before the Frigidaire meant frozen food in mass quantities, the nation's food was seasonal, regional, and traditional. It helped form the distinct character, attitudes, and customs of those who ate it. In the 1930s, with the country gripped by the Great Depression and millions of Americans struggling to get by, FDR created the Federal Writers' Project under the New Deal as a make-work program for artists and authors. A number of writers, including Zora Neale Hurston, Eudora Welty, and Nelson Algren, were dispatched all across America to chronicle the eating habits, traditions, and struggles of local people. The project, called "America Eats," was abandoned in the early 1940s because of the World War and never completed. The Food of a Younger Land unearths this forgotten literary and historical treasure and brings it to exuberant life. Mark Kurlansky's brilliant book captures these remarkable stories, and combined with authentic recipes, anecdotes, photos, and his own musings and analysis, evokes a bygone era when Americans had never heard of fast food and the grocery superstore was a thing of the future. Kurlansky serves as a guide to this hearty and poignant look at the country's roots. From New York automats to Georgia Coca-Cola parties, from Arkansas possum-eating clubs to Puget Sound salmon feasts, from Choctaw funerals to South Carolina barbecues, the WPA writers found Americans in their regional niches and eating an enormous diversity of meals. From Mississippi chittlins to Indiana persimmon puddings, Maine lobsters, and Montana beavertails, they recorded the curiosities, commonalities, and communities of American food.
2009-05-14 By Mark Kurlansky

Using long-forgotten WPA files archived in the Library of Congress, bestselling author Mark Kurlansky paints a detailed picture of Depression Era Americans through the food that they ate and the local traditions and customs they observed ...

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Using long-forgotten WPA files archived in the Library of Congress, bestselling author Mark Kurlansky paints a detailed picture of Depression Era Americans through the food that they ate and the local traditions and customs they observed ...

Author: Mark Kurlansky

Publisher:

ISBN: 1101056347

Category: Cooking, American

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View: 740

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Using long-forgotten WPA files archived in the Library of Congress, bestselling author Mark Kurlansky paints a detailed picture of Depression Era Americans through the food that they ate and the local traditions and customs they observed when planning and preparing meals.
2009 By Mark Kurlansky

Mark Kurlansky's brilliant book captures these remarkable stories, and combined with authentic recipes, anecdotes, photos, and his own musings and analysis, evokes a bygone era when Americans had never heard of fast food and the grocery ...

Author: Mark Kurlansky

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101101209

Category: Cooking

Page: 81

View: 116

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Recommended by Chef José Andrés on The Drew Barrymore Show! A remarkable portrait of American food before World War II, presented by the New York Times-bestselling author of Cod and Salt. Award-winning New York Times-bestselling author Mark Kurlansky takes us back to the food and eating habits of a younger America: Before the national highway system brought the country closer together; before chain restaurants imposed uniformity and low quality; and before the Frigidaire meant frozen food in mass quantities, the nation's food was seasonal, regional, and traditional. It helped form the distinct character, attitudes, and customs of those who ate it. In the 1930s, with the country gripped by the Great Depression and millions of Americans struggling to get by, FDR created the Federal Writers' Project under the New Deal as a make-work program for artists and authors. A number of writers, including Zora Neale Hurston, Eudora Welty, and Nelson Algren, were dispatched all across America to chronicle the eating habits, traditions, and struggles of local people. The project, called "America Eats," was abandoned in the early 1940s because of the World War and never completed. The Food of a Younger Land unearths this forgotten literary and historical treasure and brings it to exuberant life. Mark Kurlansky's brilliant book captures these remarkable stories, and combined with authentic recipes, anecdotes, photos, and his own musings and analysis, evokes a bygone era when Americans had never heard of fast food and the grocery superstore was a thing of the future. Kurlansky serves as a guide to this hearty and poignant look at the country's roots. From New York automats to Georgia Coca-Cola parties, from Arkansas possum-eating clubs to Puget Sound salmon feasts, from Choctaw funerals to South Carolina barbecues, the WPA writers found Americans in their regional niches and eating an enormous diversity of meals. From Mississippi chittlins to Indiana persimmon puddings, Maine lobsters, and Montana beavertails, they recorded the curiosities, commonalities, and communities of American food.
2009-06-30 By Mark Kurlansky

A Guide to Vacationland (Cambridge: Riverside Press, 1939), 7, on the Internet Archive, accessed April 26, 2015, https://archive.org/stream/heresn ewenglandg00federich#page/7/mode/1up. ... Kurlansky, The Food of a Younger Land, 14–15.

Author: Michelle Moon

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442257221

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 220

View: 503

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Food is such a friendly topic that it’s often thought of as a “hook” for engaging visitors – a familiar way into other topics, or a sensory element to round out a living history interpretation. But it’s more than just a hook – it’s a topic all its own, with its own history and its own uncertain future, deserving of a central place in historic interpretation. With audiences more interested in food than ever before, and new research in food studies bringing interdisciplinary approaches to this complicated but compelling subject, museums and historic sites have an opportunity to draw new audiences and infuse new meaning into their food presentations. You’ll find: A comprehensive, thematic framework of key concepts that will help you contextualize food history interpretations; A concise, evaluative review of the historiography of food interpretation; Case studies featuring the expression of these themes in the real world of museum interpretation; and Best practices for interpreting food. Interpreting Food offers a framework for understanding the big ideas in food history, suggesting best practices for linking objects, exhibits and demonstrations with the larger story of change in food production and consumption over the past two centuries – a story in which your visitors can see themselves, and explore their own relationships to food. This book can help you develop food interpretation with depth and significance, making relevant connections to contemporary issues and visitor interests.
2015-11-19 By Michelle Moon

Powell, “Lyle Saxon and the WPA Guide to New Orleans,” Southern Spaces; Kurlansky, Food of a Younger Land, 17; Lyle Saxon and Edward P. Dreyer, The WPA Guide to New Orleans (New York: Pantheon Books, 1983), 165–173. 30.

Author: Harry L. Watson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469623894

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 271

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Nourishment, nostalgia, Native ingredients and global influences. Southern Cultures's debut "best of" collection gets straight to the heart of the matter: food. For those of us who've debated mayonnaise brand, hushpuppy condiment, or barbecue style—including, in some quarters, whether the latter is a noun or a verb (bless your heart)—we present here a collection equal to our passions. Culled from our best food writing, 2008–2014, this special volume serves up tomatoes, turtles, molasses, Mother Corn and the Dixie Pig, bourbon, gravy, cakes, jams, jellies, pickles, and chocolate pie. Dig in! And stay tuned for more "best of" collections to come.
2014-12-01 By Harry L. Watson

Powell, “Lyle Saxon and the WPA Guide to New Orleans,” Southern Spaces; Kurlansky, Food of a Younger Land, 17; Lyle Saxon and Edward P. Dreyer, The WPA Guide to New Orleans (New York: Pantheon Books, 1983), 165–173. 30.

Author: Harry L. Watson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807837634

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 191

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In the Spring 2012 issue of Southern Cultures… Guest editor Marcie Cohen Ferris brings together some of the best new writing on Southern food for the Summer 2012 issue of Southern Cultures , which features an interview with TREME writer Lolis Elie and Ferris's own retrospective on Southern sociology, the WPA, and Food in the New South. The Food issue includes Rebecca Sharpless on Southern women and rural food supplies, Bernard Herman on Theodore Peed's Turtle Party, Will Sexton's "Boomtown Rabbits: The Rabbit Market in Chatham County, North Carolina," Courtney Lewis on how the "Case of the Wild Onions" paved the way for Cherokee rights, poetry by Michael Chitwood, and much more. Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.
2012-05-01 By Harry L. Watson

Taylor and Edge, “Southern Foodways,” 4–5; Davis, Gardener, and Gardener, Deep South, 385–86. 46. ... America Eats, “Recipes from Arkansas,” reprinted in Mark Kurlansky, The Food of a Younger Land (New York: Riverhead Books, 2009), 128.

Author: Janelle Collins

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 9781610755740

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 336

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Inspired by the Arkansas Review’s “What Is the Delta?” series of articles, Defining the Delta collects fifteen essays from scholars in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities to describe and define this important region. Here are essays examining the Delta’s physical properties, boundaries, and climate from a geologist, archeologist, and environmental historian. The Delta is also viewed through the lens of the social sciences and humanities—historians, folklorists, and others studying the connection between the land and its people, in particular the importance of agriculture and the culture of the area, especially music, literature, and food. Every turn of the page reveals another way of seeing the seven-state region that is bisected by and dependent on the Mississippi River, suggesting ultimately that there are myriad ways of looking at, and defining, the Delta.
2015-11-16 By Janelle Collins

M. Kurlansky, ed., The Food of a Younger Land: A Portrait of American Food from the Lost WPA Files (New York: Penguin, 2009); H. Blits, Canning Fruits and Vegetables by Hot Air and Steam and Berries by the Compounding of Syrups and the ...

Author: Meg Muckenhoupt

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479870646

Category: Cooking

Page:

View: 125

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Forages through New England’s most famous foods for the truth behind the region’s culinary myths Meg Muckenhoupt begins with a simple question: When did Bostonians start making Boston Baked Beans? Storekeepers in Faneuil Hall and Duck Tour guides may tell you that the Pilgrims learned a recipe for beans with maple syrup and bear fat from Native Americans, but in fact, the recipe for Boston Baked Beans is the result of a conscious effort in the late nineteenth century to create New England foods. New England foods were selected and resourcefully reinvented from fanciful stories about what English colonists cooked prior to the American revolution—while pointedly ignoring the foods cooked by contemporary New Englanders, especially the large immigrant populations who were powering industry and taking over farms around the region. The Truth about Baked Beans explores New England’s culinary myths and reality through some of the region’s most famous foods: baked beans, brown bread, clams, cod and lobster, maple syrup, pies, and Yankee pot roast. From 1870 to 1920, the idea of New England food was carefully constructed in magazines, newspapers, and cookbooks, often through fictitious and sometimes bizarre origin stories touted as time-honored American legends. This toothsome volume reveals the effort that went into the creation of these foods, and lets us begin to reclaim the culinary heritage of immigrant New England—the French Canadians, Irish, Italians, Portuguese, Polish, indigenous people, African-Americans, and other New Englanders whose culinary contributions were erased from this version of New England food. Complete with historic and contemporary recipes, The Truth about Baked Beans delves into the surprising history of this curious cuisine, explaining why and how “New England food” actually came to be.
2020-08-25 By Meg Muckenhoupt

The Power of Food and the Making of an American Region Marcie Cohen Ferris ... Alma Kingland, interview by Mary A. Hicks (writer), January 9, 1939, Raleigh, N.C., Federal Writers' Project ... Kurlansky, Food of a Younger Land, 17. 87.

Author: Marcie Cohen Ferris

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469617695

Category: Cooking

Page: 496

View: 972

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In The Edible South, Marcie Cohen Ferris presents food as a new way to chronicle the American South's larger history. Ferris tells a richly illustrated story of southern food and the struggles of whites, blacks, Native Americans, and other people of the region to control the nourishment of their bodies and minds, livelihoods, lands, and citizenship. The experience of food serves as an evocative lens onto colonial settlements and antebellum plantations, New South cities and civil rights-era lunch counters, chronic hunger and agricultural reform, counterculture communes and iconic restaurants as Ferris reveals how food--as cuisine and as commodity--has expressed and shaped southern identity to the present day. The region in which European settlers were greeted with unimaginable natural abundance was simultaneously the place where enslaved Africans vigilantly preserved cultural memory in cuisine and Native Americans held tight to kinship and food traditions despite mass expulsions. Southern food, Ferris argues, is intimately connected to the politics of power. The contradiction between the realities of fulsomeness and deprivation, privilege and poverty, in southern history resonates in the region's food traditions, both beloved and maligned.
2014-09-22 By Marcie Cohen Ferris

The Food of a Younger Land consists of selected America Eats materials, coupled with introductory essays by Kurlansky. The book's organization is based on the project's original geographic structure. It begins 100 Kentucky's Cookbook ...

Author: John van Willigen

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813146911

Category: Cooking

Page: 306

View: 630

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Food is a significant part of our daily lives and can be one of the most telling records of a time and place. Our meals -- from what we eat, to how we prepare it, to how we consume it -- illuminate our culture and history. As a result, cookbooks present a unique opportunity to analyze changing foodways and can yield surprising discoveries about society's tastes and priorities. In Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage, John van Willigen explores the state's history through its changing food culture, beginning with Lettice Bryan's The Kentucky Housewife (originally published in 1839). Considered one of the earliest regional cookbooks, The Kentucky Housewife includes pre--Civil War recipes intended for use by a household staff instead of an individual cook, along with instructions for serving the family. Van Willigen also shares the story of the original Aunt Jemima -- the advertising persona of Nancy Green, born in Montgomery County, Kentucky -- who was one of many African American voices in Kentucky culinary history. Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage is a journey through the history of the commonwealth, showcasing the shifting priorities and innovations of the times. Analyzing the historical importance of a wide range of publications, from the nonprofit and charity cookbooks that flourished at the end of the twentieth century to the contemporary cookbook that emphasizes local ingredients, van Willigen provides a valuable perspective on the state's social history.
2014-09-12 By John van Willigen

Mark Kurlansky, The Foodofa Younger Land: A PortraitofAmerican Food (New York: Riverhead Books, 2010), 142. 2. Camille Bégin, Taste ofthe Nation: The New DealSearch for America's Food (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2016),90–91.

Author: Catherine Keyser

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190673147

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 484

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In Artificial Color, Catherine Keyser examines the early twentieth century phenomenon, wherein US writers became fascinated with modern food--global geographies, nutritional theories, and technological innovations. African American literature of the 1920s and 1930s uses new food technologies as imaginative models for resisting and recasting oppressive racial categories. In his masterwork Cane (1923), Jean Toomer follows sugar from the boiling-pots of the South to the speakeasies of the North. Through effervescent and colorful soda, he rejects the binary of black and white in favor of a dream of artificial color and a new American race. In his serial science fiction, Black Empire (1938-39), George Schuyler associates hydroponics and raw foods with racial hybridity and utopian futures. The second half of the book focuses on white expatriate writers who experienced local food cultures as sensuous encounters with racial others. Ernest Hemingway and Gertrude Stein associate regional European races with the ideal of terroir and aspire to transplantation through their own connoisseurship. In their novels set in the Mediterranean, F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald both dramatize the white body's susceptibility to intoxicating and stimulating substances like wine and coffee. For Scott Fitzgerald, the climatological and culinary corruption of the South produces the tragic fall of white masculinity. For Zelda, by contrast, it exposes the destructiveness and fictitiousness of the white feminine purity ideal. During the Great Depression and the Second World War, African American writers Zora Neale Hurston and Dorothy West exposed the racism that shaped the global food industry and the precarity of black labor. Their engagement with food, however, insisted upon pleasure as well as vulnerability, the potential of sensuous flesh and racial affiliation. In its embrace of invention and interconnection, Catherine Keyser contends, this modern fiction reveals that, far from being stable, whiteness may be the most obviously artificial color of them all.
2018-12-24 By Catherine Keyser

Kurlansky, Food of a Younger Land, 17; Camille Bégin, Taste of the Nation: The New Deal Search for America's Food (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2016), 58; and Camille Bégin, “America Eats: Taste and Race in the New Deal Sensory ...

Author: Marilyn Irvin Holt

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9781496218001

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 99

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As a New Deal program, the Federal Writers' Project (FWP) aimed to put unemployed writers, teachers, and librarians to work. The contributors were to collect information, write essays, conduct interviews, and edit material with the goal of producing guidebooks in each of the then forty-eight states and U.S. territories. Project administrators hoped that these guides, known as the American Guide Series, would promote a national appreciation for America's history, culture, and diversity and preserve democracy at a time when militarism was on the rise and parts of the world were dominated by fascism. Marilyn Irvin Holt focuses on the Nebraska project, which was one of the most prolific branches of the national program. Best remembered for its state guide and series of folklore and pioneer pamphlets, the project also produced town guides, published a volume on African Americans in Nebraska, and created an ethnic study of Italians in Omaha. In Nebraska during the New Deal Holt examines Nebraska's contribution to the project, both in terms of its place within the national FWP as well as its operation in comparison to other state projects.
2019-12 By Marilyn Irvin Holt

The Food of a Younger Land: A Portrait of American Food— Before the National Highway System, Before Chain Restaurants, and Before Frozen Food, When the Nation's Food Was Seasonal, Regional, and Traditional —From the Lost WPA Files.

Author: Cindy Grisham

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781625840486

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 168

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Up and down the Arkansas Delta, food tells a story. Whether the time Bill Clinton nearly died on the way to a coon dinner or the connections made over biscuits and gravy or the more common chicken and dumpling feuds, the area is no stranger to history. One of America's last frontiers, it was settled in the late nineteenth century by a rough-and-tumble collection of timber men, sharecroppers and entrepreneurs from all over the world who embraced the traditional foodways and added their own twists. Today, the Arkansas Delta is the nation's largest producer of rice and adds other crops like catfish and sweet potatoes. Join author Cindy Grisham for this delicious look into Delta cuisine.
2013-05-14 By Cindy Grisham

See also The Food of a Younger Land, ed. Mark Kurlansky (New York: Riverhead, 2009), 102. 2. The Food of Younger Land, 108. 3. Southern Sideboards (Jackson, Miss.: Junior League of Jackson, 1978), 272. 4. Jackson Cookbook (Jackson, Miss ...

Author: Gary Scharnhorst

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786475483

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 223

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This is a comprehensive collection of authentic recipes, some 500 in all, for drinks and dishes that more than 150 American authors since the late 18th century are known to have enjoyed. The book should appeal to amateur chefs and so-called "foodies" who may want to test some of the recipes in their kitchens; to American literature instructors and scholars who may use it as a teaching tool; and general readers who will read it for pleasure. In effect, this is a celebrity cookbook to which many literary celebrities, living and dead, have contributed, among them Harriet Beecher Stowe, Rudolfo Anaya, Denise Chavez, Emily Dickinson, William Faulkner, Harlan Ellison, Ursula Le Guin, Benjamin Franklin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jack London, Allen Ginsberg, Lafcadio Hearn, Ernest Hemingway, Jack Kerouac, Elmore Leonard, Bobbie Ann Mason, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Leslie Marmon Silko, Gertrude Stein, Onoto Watanna, Eudora Welty, Walt Whitman, and Gerald Vizenor.
2014-03-28 By Gary Scharnhorst

The Food of a Younger Land: A Portrait of American Food: Before the National Highway System, before Chain Restaurants, and before Frozen Food, When the Nation's Food Was Seasonal, Regional, and Traditional: From the Lost WPA Files.

Author: Jonathan Deutsch

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440841125

Category: Cooking

Page: 339

View: 477

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This entertaining and informative encyclopedia examines American regional foods, using cuisine as an engaging lens through which readers can deepen their study of American geography in addition to their understanding of America's collective cultures. • Includes dozens of recipes that students and readers can test for themselves • Highlights and thus preserves the cultural integrity of endangered regional foods • Supports learning through engagingly written entries accessible to readers of all ages • Allows readers to think critically about foods and their origins • Highlights "fun facts" about the entries, including terminology and laws, in sidebars
2018-05-25 By Jonathan Deutsch

The Cambridge World History of Food. ... The Food of a Younger Land: A Portrait of American Food—Before the National Highway System, Before Chain Restaurants, and Before Frozen Food, When the Nation's Food Was Seasonal, Regional, ...

Author: Andrew F. Smith

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781610692335

Category: COOKING

Page: 1475

View: 568

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This three-volume encyclopedia on the history of American food and beverages covers topics ranging from early American Indian foods to mandatory nutrition information at fast food restaurants.
2013-10-28 By Andrew F. Smith

Writings on Farming, Culture, and the Land Edwin C. Hagenstein, Sara M. Gregg, Brian Donahue ... Schlosser's Fast Food Nation, Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma and In Defense of Food, Mark Kurlansky's The Food of a Younger Land, ...

Author: Edwin C. Hagenstein

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300137095

Category: Social Science

Page: 406

View: 973

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From Thomas Jefferson's Monticello to Michelle Obama's White House organic garden, the image of America as a nation of farmers has persisted from the beginnings of the American experiment. In this rich and evocative collection of agrarian writing from the past two centuries, writers from Hector St. Jean de Crevecoeur to Wendell Berry reveal not only the great reach and durability of the American agrarian ideal, but also the ways in which society has contested and confronted its relationship to agriculture over the course of generations. Drawing inspiration from Virgil's agrarian epic poem, Georgics, this collection presents a complex historical portrait of the American character through its relationship to the land. From the first European settlers eager to cultivate new soil, to the Transcendentalist, utopian, and religious thinkers of the nineteenth century, American society has drawn upon the vision of a pure rural life for inspiration. Back-to-the-land movements have surged and retreated in the past centuries yet provided the agrarian roots for the environmental movement of the past forty years. Interpretative essays and a sprinkling of illustrations accompany excerpts from each of these periods of American agrarian thought, providing a framework for understanding the sweeping changes that have confronted the nation's landscape.
2011-01-01 By Edwin C. Hagenstein

Gabbacia, Donna R. (2000) We Are What We Eat: Ethnic Food an the Making of Americans. ... Glassner, Barry (2007) The Gospel of Food: Everything You Think You Know About Food Is Wrong. ... (2009) The Food of a Younger Land.

Author: Ken Albala

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136741661

Category: Social Science

Page: 424

View: 222

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Over the past decade there has been a remarkable flowering of interest in food and nutrition, both within the popular media and in academia. Scholars are increasingly using foodways, food systems and eating habits as a new unit of analysis within their own disciplines, and students are rushing into classes and formal degree programs focused on food. Introduced by the editor and including original articles by over thirty leading food scholars from around the world, the Routledge International Handbook of Food Studies offers students, scholars and all those interested in food-related research a one-stop, easy-to-use reference guide. Each article includes a brief history of food research within a discipline or on a particular topic, a discussion of research methodologies and ideological or theoretical positions, resources for research, including archives, grants and fellowship opportunities, as well as suggestions for further study. Each entry also explains the logistics of succeeding as a student and professional in food studies. This clear, direct Handbook will appeal to those hoping to start a career in academic food studies as well as those hoping to shift their research to a food-related project. Strongly interdisciplinary, this work will be of interest to students and scholars throughout the social sciences and humanities.
2013-05-07 By Ken Albala

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