Search Results for the-ancient-novel

Hägg terms the late ancient novels 'popular' books,9 but Stephens in tallying the number of literary papyri found in Egypt notes that “one and one-half times as much New Comedy and Menander” survives there as ancient novels.

Author: Stelios Panayotakis

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789047402114

Category: Classical fiction

Page: 489

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This collection of wide-ranging essays offers a fascinating overview of current scholarly approaches to the ancient novel and related texts. These are discussed in their literary, cultural and social context, and as sources of inspiration for Byzantine and modern fiction.

'Plato's Symposium and the traditions of ancient fiction', in: J. Lesher, D. Nails, and F. Sheffield (eds.) ... The Cambridge Companion to the Greek and Roman Novel, Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, 261271.

Author: Marília Futre Pinheiro

Publisher: Barkhuis

ISBN: 9789491431937

Category: History

Page: 179

View: 861

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The papers assembled in this volume explore a relatively new area in scholarship on the ancient novel: the relationship between an ostensibly non-philosophical genre and philosophy. This approach opens up several original themes for further research and debate. Platonising fiction was popular in the Second Sophistic and it took a variety of forms, ranging from the intertextual to the allegorical, and discussions of the origins of the novel-genre in antiquity have centred on the role of Socratic dialogue in general and Plato’s dialogues in particular as important precursors. The papers in this collection cover a variety of genres, ranging from the Greek and Roman novels to utopian narratives and fictional biographies, and seek by diverse methods to detect philosophical resonances in these texts.
2015-09-01 By Marília Futre Pinheiro

The theme of the present volume, 'Readers and Writers in the Ancient Novel,' gives the contributors to this book the freedom (intended by the organizers) to use their skills to tease out within the works of the genre new perspectives on ...

Author: Michael Paschalis

Publisher: Barkhuis

ISBN: 9789077922545

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 631

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The present volume comprises most of the papers delivered at RICAN 4 in 2007. The focus is placed on readers and writers in the ancient novel and broadly in ancient fiction, though without ignoring readers and writers of the ancient novel. The papers offer a wide and rich range of perspectives: the reading of novels in antiquity as a process of active engagement with the text (Konstan); the dialogic character, involving writer and reader, of Lucian's Verae Historiae (Futre Pinheiro); book divisions in Chariton's Callirhoe as prompts guiding the reader towards gradual mastery over the text (Whitmarsh); polypragmosyne (curiosity) in ancient fiction and how it affects the practice of reading novels (Hunter); the intriguing relationship between the writing and reading of inscriptions in ancient fiction (Slater); the tension between public and private in constructing and reading of texts inserted in the novelistic prose (Nimis); the intertextual pedigree of the poet Eumolpus (Smith); Seneca's Claudius and Petronius' Encolpius as readers of Homer and Virgil and writers of literary scenarios (Paschalis); the ways in which some Greek novels draw the reader's attention to their status as written texts (Bowie); the interfaces between tellers and receivers of stories in Antonius Diogenes (Morgan); the generic components and the putative author of the Alexander Romance (Stoneman); Diktys as a writer and ways of reading his Ephemeris (Dowden); the presence and character of Iliadic intertexts in Apuleius' Metamorphoses (Harrison); the contrasting roles of the narrator-translator in Apuleius' Metamorphoses and De deo Socratis (Fletcher); seriocomic strategies by Roman authors of narrative fiction and fable (Graverini & Keulen); reading as a function for recognizing 'allegorical moments' in the Metamorphoses of Apuleius (Zimmerman); active and passive reading as embedded in Philostratus' Life of Apollonius; and the importance of book reading in Augustine's 'novelistic' Confessions (Hunink).

Abstract: Scholarship on the ancient novel does not engage what the novelists, or, for that matter, other ancient authors, considered or thought of as 'horror'. This essay examines novel passages that may be said to stir horror in the ...

Author: Marília P. Futre Pinheiro

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9781501503986

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 407

View: 337

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The protagonists of the ancient novels wandered or were carried off to distant lands, from Italy in the west to Persia in the east and Ethiopia in the south; the authors themselves came, or pretended to come, from remote places such as Aphrodisia and Phoenicia; and the novelistic form had antecedents in a host of classical genres. These intersections are explored in this volume. Papers in the first section discuss “mapping the world in the novels.” The second part looks at the dialogical imagination, and the conversation between fiction and history in the novels. Section 3 looks at the way ancient fiction has been transmitted and received. Space, as the locus of cultural interaction and exchange, is the topic of the fourth part. The fifth and final section is devoted to character and emotion, and how these are perceived or constructed in ancient fiction. Overall, a rich picture is offered of the many spatial and cultural dimensions in a variety of ancient fictional genres.

In Authors, Authority, and Interpreters in the Ancient Novel, Essays in Honor of Gareth Schmeling, edited by S.N. Byrne, E.P. Cueva, and J. Alvares. Ancient Narrative Supplementum 5. Groningen: Barkhuis Publishing, pp. 147– 171.

Author: Edmund P. Cueva

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118350584

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 632

View: 853

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This companion addresses a topic of continuing contemporary relevance, both cultural and literary. Offers both a wide-ranging exploration of the classical novel of antiquity and a wealth of close literary analysis Brings together the most up-to-date international scholarship on the ancient novel, including fresh new academic voices Includes focused chapters on individual classical authors, such as Petronius, Xenophon and Apuleius, as well as a wide-ranging thematic analysis Addresses perplexing questions concerning authorial expression and readership of the ancient novel form Provides an accomplished introduction to a genre with a rising profile
2014-01-31 By Edmund P. Cueva

If we recognize this much, we have already before us, in our consideration of the conventions that informed the readers of the ancient novels, an essential part of the answer to the problem posed at the beginning of this chapter.

Author: Shadi Bartsch

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400860487

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 212

View: 295

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Using a reader-oriented approach, Shadi Bartsch reconsiders the role of detailed descriptive accounts in the ancient Greek novels of Heliodorus and Achilles Tatius and in so doing offers a new view of the genre itself. Bartsch demonstrates that these passages, often misunderstood as mere ornamental devices, form in fact an integral part of the narrative proper, working to activate the audience's awareness of the play of meaning in the story. As the crucial elements in the evolution of a relationship in which the author arouses and then undermines the expectations of his readership, these passages provide the key to a better understanding and interpretation of these two most sophisticated of the ancient Greek romances. In many works of the Second Sophistic, descriptions of visual conveyors of meaning--artworks and dreams--signaled the presence of a deeper meaning. This meaning was revealed in the texts themselves through an interpretation furnished by the author. The two novels at hand, however, manipulate this convention of hermeneutic description by playing upon their readers' expectations and luring them into the trap of incorrect exegesis. Employed for different ends in the context of each work, this process has similar implications in both for the relationship between reader and author as it arises out of the former's involvement with the text. Originally published in 1989. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
2014-07-14 By Shadi Bartsch

Authors, Authority, and Interpreters in the Ancient Novel: Essays in Honor of Gareth L. Schmeling, Ancient Narrative Supplementum 5, Groningen: Barkhuis Publ. & Groningen University Library, 131-146. De Temmerman, K. 2009.

Author: Stelios Panayotakis

Publisher: Barkhuis

ISBN: 9789491431920

Category: History

Page: 211

View: 264

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The present volume comprises the papers delivered at RICAN 6, which was held in Rethymnon, Crete, on May 30-31, 2011. The focus is placed on male and female characters in the ancient novel and related texts, both pagan and Christian; these characters are presented either as holy or as charlatans but in several cases the two categories cannot be easily distinguished from each other. The papers offer a wide and rich range of perspectives.
2015-09-01 By Stelios Panayotakis

His research interests include Homeric epic, drama, song and performance culture, and the ancient novel. His books include Dionysos und die griechische Tragödie (1991); Die Orestie des Aischylos auf der modernen Bühne (1996); Der Chor ...

Author: Marília P. Futre Pinheiro

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110311907

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 373

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Representation of myth in the novel, as a poetic, narrative and aesthetic device, is one of the most illuminating issues in the area of ancient religion, for such narratives investigate in various ways fundamental problems that concern all human beings. This volume brings together twenty contributions (six of them to a Roundtable organized by Anton Bierl on myth), originally presented at the Fourth International Conference on the Ancient novel (ICAN IV) held in Lisbon in July 2008. Employing an interdisciplinary approach and putting together different methodological tools (intertextual, psychological, and anthropological), each offers a illuminating investigation of mythical discourse as presented in the text or texts under discussion. The collection as a whole demonstrates the exemplary and transgressive significance of myth and its metaphorical meaning in a genre that to some extent can be considered a modernized and secular form of myth that focuses on the quintessential question of love.

Admittedly indebted to ancient literature, as mentioned above, the ancient novel develops itself within a diachronic process in which every text is a crossroad of semic elements in permanent dialogue.7 This dialogue between hypotexts ...

Author: Marília P. Futre Pinheiro

Publisher: Barkhuis

ISBN: 9789493194465

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 173

View: 978

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The papers in this volume discuss, from various perspectives, the engagement of the ancient novels with their predecessors and aim to identify and interpret the resonances, of different degrees of closeness, of those texts (Homeric epics, traditional and nuptial poetry, the historiographical tradition, Greek theatre, Latin love elegy and pantomime) as elements of an intertextual and metadiscursive play.

Scott, J.C. 1990. Domination and the Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcripts, New Haven: Yale University Press. Stephens, S.A. 1994. 'Who Read Ancient Novels?', in: J. Tatum (ed.), The Search for the Ancient Novel, Baltimore and ...

Author: Stelios Panayotakis

Publisher: Barkhuis

ISBN: 9789492444196

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 300

View: 216

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The present volume contains revised versions of most of the papers that were delivered at RICAN 7, which was held in Rethymnon, Crete, on 27-28 May 2013. The focus of the conference was on the portrayal and function of male and female slaves and their masters/mistresses in the ancient novel and related texts; the complex relationship between these social categories raises questions about slavery and freedom, gender and identity, stability of the self and social mobility, social control and social death. The papers offer a wide and rich range of perspectives: enslavement of elite women in Chariton's Callirhoe and Stoic ideas of moral slavery in Dio Chrysostom (Hilton); reversal of social status and techniques of (self-)characterization in Chariton (De Temmerman); the interaction between implicit and explicit narratives of slavery in Chariton and its effect on the readers of the novel (Owens); the narratological, structural and symbolic centrality of slavery in Xenophon's Ephesiaka (Trzaskoma); the socio-historical dimensions of slavery and the prominent discourse on despotism in Iamblichus' Babyloniaka (Dowden); the balance between historical accuracy and fiction in the representation of slavery in Achilles Tatius (Billault); animals, human slaves and elite masters, and the presence of Rome in Longus' Daphnis and Chloe (Bowie); the distribution of slaves on the geographical, cultural and moral maps drawn in Heliodorus' Aithiopika (Montiglio); slave women and their relationships to their mistresses as positive and negative paradigms of love in Heliodorus' Aithiopika (Morgan and Repath); the freedman's world as a self-perpetuating and closed universe in Petronius' Satyrica (Bodel); beauty, slavery and the destabilization of societal norms and authority figures in Petronius' Satyrica (Panayotakis); the interaction between Roman comedy and elegy in the representation of the relationship of Lucius and Photis in Apuleius' Metamorphoses (May); a comparative analysis of the semantics and function of slavery-related terms in pseudo-Lucian's Onos and Apuleius' Metamorphoses (Paschalis); enslaved and free storytelling in the Life of Aesop and the history and evolution of the ancient fable tradition (Lefkowitz).
2019-12-31 By Stelios Panayotakis