Search Results for teaching-statistics-a-bag-of-tricks

Part I of the book presents a large selection of activities for introductory statistics courses and has chapters such as 'First week of class'-- with exercises to break the ice and get students talking; then descriptive statistics, graphics ...

Author: Andrew Gelman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198785699

Category: Mathematics

Page: 432

View: 777

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Students in the sciences, economics, social sciences, and medicine take an introductory statistics course. And yet statistics can be notoriously difficult for instructors to teach and for students to learn. To help overcome these challenges, Gelman and Nolan have put together this fascinating and thought-provoking book. Based on years of teaching experience the book provides a wealth of demonstrations, activities, examples, and projects that involve active student participation. Part I of the book presents a large selection of activities for introductory statistics courses and has chapters such as 'First week of class'-- with exercises to break the ice and get students talking; then descriptive statistics, graphics, linear regression, data collection (sampling and experimentation), probability, inference, and statistical communication. Part II gives tips on what works and what doesn't, how to set up effective demonstrations, how to encourage students to participate in class and to work effectively in group projects. Course plans for introductory statistics, statistics for social scientists, and communication and graphics are provided. Part III presents material for more advanced courses on topics such as decision theory, Bayesian statistics, sampling, and data science.
2017-04-30 By Andrew Gelman

A Bag of Tricks Andrew Gelman, Deborah Nolan. Teaching Statistics A Bag of Tricks Andrew Gelman Columbia University Deborah Nolan University of California, Berkeley Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP Oxford University Press is.

Author: Andrew Gelman

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191606991

Category: Mathematics

Page: 320

View: 805

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Students in the sciences, economics, psychology, social sciences, and medicine take introductory statistics. Statistics is increasingly offered at the high school level as well. However, statistics can be notoriously difficult to teach as it is seen by many students as difficult and boring, if not irrelevant to their subject of choice. To help dispel these misconceptions, Gelman and Nolan have put together this fascinating and thought-provoking book. Based on years of teaching experience the book provides a wealth of demonstrations, examples and projects that involve active student participation. Part I of the book presents a large selection of activities for introductory statistics courses and combines chapters such as, 'First week of class', with exercises to break the ice and get students talking; then 'Descriptive statistics' , collecting and displaying data; then follows the traditional topics - linear regression, data collection, probability and inference. Part II gives tips on what does and what doesn't work in class: how to set up effective demonstrations and examples, how to encourage students to participate in class and work effectively in group projects. A sample course plan is provided. Part III presents material for more advanced courses on topics such as decision theory, Bayesian statistics and sampling.
2002-08-08 By Andrew Gelman

"Based on years of teaching experience, this work provides a wealth of demonstrations, examples, projects and course plans for teachers of statistics courses at all levels.

Author: Andrew Gelman

Publisher:

ISBN: 0191827517

Category: Statistics

Page: 404

View: 732

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Based on years of teaching experience, this work provides a wealth of demonstrations, examples, projects and course plans for teachers of statistics courses at all levels. It also includes hints on how to organize and motivate student groups.
2017 By Andrew Gelman

Teaching. Materials. You're so good at this statistics stuff that you might as well start helping your neighbor and colleague in class. If that's the case, turn to Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks at ...

Author: Neil J. Salkind

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 9781506333854

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 792

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The Sixth Edition of Neil J. Salkind’s best-selling Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics promises to ease student anxiety around an often intimidating subject with a humorous, personable, and informative approach. Salkind guides students through various statistical procedures, beginning with descriptive statistics, correlation, and graphical representation of data, and ending with inferential techniques and analysis of variance. New to this edition is an introduction to working with large data sets.
2016-09-13 By Neil J. Salkind

Review of Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks. The American Statistician, 59, 275. Donnelly, C. M., and McDaniel, M.A. 1993. Use of Analogy in Learning Scientific Concepts. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, ...

Author: Mircea Pitici

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400865307

Category: Mathematics

Page: 360

View: 236

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The year's finest writing on mathematics from around the world This annual anthology brings together the year's finest mathematics writing from around the world. Featuring promising new voices alongside some of the foremost names in the field, The Best Writing on Mathematics 2014 makes available to a wide audience many articles not easily found anywhere else—and you don’t need to be a mathematician to enjoy them. These writings offer surprising insights into the nature, meaning, and practice of mathematics today. They delve into the history, philosophy, teaching, and everyday occurrences of math, and take readers behind the scenes of today’s hottest mathematical debates. Here John Conway presents examples of arithmetical statements that are almost certainly true but likely unprovable; Carlo Séquin explores, compares, and illustrates distinct types of one-sided surfaces known as Klein bottles; Keith Devlin asks what makes a video game good for learning mathematics and shows why many games fall short of that goal; Jordan Ellenberg reports on a recent breakthrough in the study of prime numbers; Stephen Pollard argues that mathematical practice, thinking, and experience transcend the utilitarian value of mathematics; and much, much more. In addition to presenting the year’s most memorable writings on mathematics, this must-have anthology includes an introduction by editor Mircea Pitici. This book belongs on the shelf of anyone interested in where math has taken us—and where it is headed.
2014-11-23 By Mircea Pitici

Innovations in teaching statistics (MAA Notes Volume 65). ... Each chapter begins by describing how the author became a teacher of statistics, then provides details about the courses they ... Teaching statistics: A bag of tricks.

Author: Joan Garfield

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781402083839

Category: Education

Page: 408

View: 624

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Increased attention is being paid to the need for statistically educated citizens: statistics is now included in the K-12 mathematics curriculum, increasing numbers of students are taking courses in high school, and introductory statistics courses are required in college. However, increasing the amount of instruction is not sufficient to prepare statistically literate citizens. A major change is needed in how statistics is taught. To bring about this change, three dimensions of teacher knowledge need to be addressed: their knowledge of statistical content, their pedagogical knowledge, and their statistical-pedagogical knowledge, i.e., their specific knowledge about how to teach statistics. This book is written for mathematics and statistics educators and researchers. It summarizes the research and highlights the important concepts for teachers to emphasize, and shows the interrelationships among concepts. It makes specific suggestions regarding how to build classroom activities, integrate technological tools, and assess students’ learning. This is a unique book. While providing a wealth of examples through lessons and data sets, it is also the best attempt by members of our profession to integrate suggestions from research findings with statistics concepts and pedagogy. The book’s message about the importance of listening to research is loud and clear, as is its message about alternative ways of teaching statistics. This book will impact instructors, giving them pause to consider: "Is what I’m doing now really the best thing for my students? What could I do better?" J. Michael Shaughnessy, Professor, Dept of Mathematical Sciences, Portland State University, USA This is a much-needed text for linking research and practice in teaching statistics. The authors have provided a comprehensive overview of the current state-of-the-art in statistics education research. The insights they have gleaned from the literature should be tremendously helpful for those involved in teaching and researching introductory courses. Randall E. Groth, Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education, Salisbury University, USA
2008-09-08 By Joan Garfield

Journal of Statistics Educa- tion, 10(2), Retrieved May 9, 2012 from www.amstat. org/publications/jse/v10n2/garfield.html. Gelman, A., & Nolan, D. (2002). Teaching statistics: A bag of tricks. New York: Oxford University Press.

Author: Todd D. Little

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199370153

Category: Psychology

Page: 515

View: 614

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This two-volume handbook on current best-practices in quantitative methods as practiced in the social, behavioral, and educational sciences covers philosophical and ethical issues, theory construction, model building and types of models, survey and experiment design, measurement issues, observational methods, statistical methods, types of analysis, types of data, and common research fallacies.
2014 By Todd D. Little

Andrew Gelman and Deborah Nolan, Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2002. Sheldon Gordon, “What's wrong with college algebra?” SUNY/UUP Working Papers series, 2005. Charles Graham, Tonya Tripp, ...

Author: Kelly Slater Cline

Publisher: MAA

ISBN: 9781614443018

Category: Electronic books

Page: 173

View: 829

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Are you looking for new ways to engage your students? Classroom voting can be a powerful way to enliven your classroom, by requiring all students to consider a question, discuss it with their peers, and vote on the answer during class. When used in the right way, students engage more deeply with the material, and have fun in the process, while you get valuable feedback when you see how they voted. But what are the best strategies to integrate voting into your lesson plans? How do you teach the full curriculum while including these voting events? How do you find the right questions for your students? This collection includes papers from faculty at institutions across the country, teaching a broad range of courses with classroom voting, including college algebra, precalculus, calculus, statistics, linear algebra, differential equations, and beyond. These faculty share their experiences and explain how they have used classroom voting to engage students, to provoke discussions, and to improve how they teach mathematics. This volume should be of interest to anyone who wants to begin using classroom voting as well as people who are already using it but would like to know what others are doing. While the authors are primarily college-level faculty, many of the papers could also be of interest to high school mathematics teachers. --Publisher description.

Gelman, A. and Nolan, D. (2002) Teaching statistics: A bag of tricks, Oxford University Press, New York. Gerstman, B. B. (2008) StatPrimer, http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/gerstman/StatPrimer (accessed 11 December 2009).

Author: Penelope Bidgood

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470710462

Category: Mathematics

Page: 304

View: 802

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Assessment Methods in Statistical Education: An International Perspective provides a modern, international perspective on assessing students of statistics in higher education. It is a collection of contributions written by some of the leading figures in statistical education from around the world, drawing on their personal teaching experience and educational research. The book reflects the wide variety of disciplines, such as business, psychology and the health sciences, which include statistics teaching and assessment. The authors acknowledge the increasingly important role of technology in assessment, whether it be using the internet for accessing information and data sources or using software to construct and manage individualised or online assessments. Key Features: Presents successful assessment strategies, striking a balance between formative and summative assessment, individual and group work, take-away assignments and supervised tests. Assesses statistical thinking by questioning students’ ability to interpret and communicate the results of their analysis. Relates assessment to the real world by basing it on real data in an appropriate context. Provides a range of individualised assessment methods, including those that deter plagiarism and collusion by providing each student with a unique problem to solve or dataset to analyse. This book is essential reading for anyone involved in teaching statistics at tertiary level or interested in statistical education research.
2010-03-10 By Penelope Bidgood

Practical Statistics for Nursing and Health Care. ... From association to causation: some remarks on the history of statistics. ... Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks: Oxford University Press, United Kingdom. Gershkovich, E. (2020).

Author: Alessandro Martinisi

Publisher: Anthem Press

ISBN: 9781785275357

Category: Social Science

Page: 250

View: 250

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This book looks at how numbers and statistics have been used to underpin quality in news reporting. In doing so, the aim is to challenge some common assumptions about how journalists engage and use statistics in their quest for quality news. It seeks to improve our understanding about the usage of data and statistics as a primary means for the construction of social reality. This is a task, in our view, that is urgent in times of ‘post-truth’ politics and the rise of ‘fake news’. In this sense, the quest to produce ‘quality’ news, which seems to require incorporating statistics and engaging with data, as laudable and straightforward as it sounds, is instead far more problematic and complex than what is often accounted for.
2020-10-29 By Alessandro Martinisi