Search Results for sodium-intake-in-populations

Sodium Intake in Populations is a summary of the findings and conclusions on evidence for associations between sodium intake and risk of CVD-related events and mortality.

Author: Institute of Medicine

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 9780309282987

Category: Medical

Page: 224

View: 954

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Despite efforts over the past several decades to reduce sodium intake in the United States, adults still consume an average of 3,400 mg of sodium every day. A number of scientific bodies and professional health organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association, support reducing dietary sodium intake. These organizations support a common goal to reduce daily sodium intake to less than 2,300 milligrams and further reduce intake to 1,500 mg among persons who are 51 years of age and older and those of any age who are African-American or have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease. A substantial body of evidence supports these efforts to reduce sodium intake. This evidence links excessive dietary sodium to high blood pressure, a surrogate marker for cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke, and cardiac-related mortality. However, concerns have been raised that a low sodium intake may adversely affect certain risk factors, including blood lipids and insulin resistance, and thus potentially increase risk of heart disease and stroke. In fact, several recent reports have challenged sodium reduction in the population as a strategy to reduce this risk. Sodium Intake in Populations recognizes the limitations of the available evidence, and explains that there is no consistent evidence to support an association between sodium intake and either a beneficial or adverse effect on most direct health outcomes other than some CVD outcomes (including stroke and CVD mortality) and all-cause mortality. Some evidence suggested that decreasing sodium intake could possibly reduce the risk of gastric cancer. However, the evidence was too limited to conclude the converse-that higher sodium intake could possibly increase the risk of gastric cancer. Interpreting these findings was particularly challenging because most studies were conducted outside the United States in populations consuming much higher levels of sodium than those consumed in this country. Sodium Intake in Populations is a summary of the findings and conclusions on evidence for associations between sodium intake and risk of CVD-related events and mortality.
2013-08-27 By Institute of Medicine

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ISBN: OCLC:971068833

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2013 By

44 SODIUM INTAKE IN POPULATIONS all-cause mortality, CVD, stroke, and coronary heart disease was of lower quality. Nevertheless, collectively, the WHO concluded that the evidence reviewed supports the conclusion that any reduction in ...

Author: Institute of Medicine

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 9780309282956

Category: Medical

Page: 224

View: 844

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Despite efforts over the past several decades to reduce sodium intake in the United States, adults still consume an average of 3,400 mg of sodium every day. A number of scientific bodies and professional health organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American Medical Association, and the American Public Health Association, support reducing dietary sodium intake. These organizations support a common goal to reduce daily sodium intake to less than 2,300 milligrams and further reduce intake to 1,500 mg among persons who are 51 years of age and older and those of any age who are African-American or have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease. A substantial body of evidence supports these efforts to reduce sodium intake. This evidence links excessive dietary sodium to high blood pressure, a surrogate marker for cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke, and cardiac-related mortality. However, concerns have been raised that a low sodium intake may adversely affect certain risk factors, including blood lipids and insulin resistance, and thus potentially increase risk of heart disease and stroke. In fact, several recent reports have challenged sodium reduction in the population as a strategy to reduce this risk. Sodium Intake in Populations recognizes the limitations of the available evidence, and explains that there is no consistent evidence to support an association between sodium intake and either a beneficial or adverse effect on most direct health outcomes other than some CVD outcomes (including stroke and CVD mortality) and all-cause mortality. Some evidence suggested that decreasing sodium intake could possibly reduce the risk of gastric cancer. However, the evidence was too limited to conclude the converse-that higher sodium intake could possibly increase the risk of gastric cancer. Interpreting these findings was particularly challenging because most studies were conducted outside the United States in populations consuming much higher levels of sodium than those consumed in this country. Sodium Intake in Populations is a summary of the findings and conclusions on evidence for associations between sodium intake and risk of CVD-related events and mortality.
2013-09-27 By Institute of Medicine

The book reviews past and ongoing efforts to reduce the sodium content of the food supply and to motivate consumers to change behavior. Based on past lessons learned, the book makes recommendations for future initiatives.

Author: Institute of Medicine

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 9780309148054

Category: Medical

Page: 506

View: 225

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Reducing the intake of sodium is an important public health goal for Americans. Since the 1970s, an array of public health interventions and national dietary guidelines has sought to reduce sodium intake. However, the U.S. population still consumes more sodium than is recommended, placing individuals at risk for diseases related to elevated blood pressure. Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake in the United States evaluates and makes recommendations about strategies that could be implemented to reduce dietary sodium intake to levels recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The book reviews past and ongoing efforts to reduce the sodium content of the food supply and to motivate consumers to change behavior. Based on past lessons learned, the book makes recommendations for future initiatives. It is an excellent resource for federal and state public health officials, the processed food and food service industries, health care professionals, consumer advocacy groups, and academic researchers.
2010-11-14 By Institute of Medicine

This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue "Reducing Dietary Sodium and Improving Human Health" that was published in Nutrients

Author: Jacqui Webster

Publisher: MDPI

ISBN: 9783038429258

Category: Medical

Page: 400

View: 105

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This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue "Reducing Dietary Sodium and Improving Human Health" that was published in Nutrients
2018-05-18 By Jacqui Webster

In clinical settings, these are two important blood electrolytes, are frequently measured and influence care decisions.

Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 9780309488341

Category: Medical

Page: 594

View: 419

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As essential nutrients, sodium and potassium contribute to the fundamentals of physiology and pathology of human health and disease. In clinical settings, these are two important blood electrolytes, are frequently measured and influence care decisions. Yet, blood electrolyte concentrations are usually not influenced by dietary intake, as kidney and hormone systems carefully regulate blood values. Over the years, increasing evidence suggests that sodium and potassium intake patterns of children and adults influence long-term population health mostly through complex relationships among dietary intake, blood pressure and cardiovascular health. The public health importance of understanding these relationships, based upon the best available evidence and establishing recommendations to support the development of population clinical practice guidelines and medical care of patients is clear. This report reviews evidence on the relationship between sodium and potassium intakes and indicators of adequacy, toxicity, and chronic disease. It updates the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) using an expanded DRI model that includes consideration of chronic disease endpoints, and outlines research gaps to address the uncertainties identified in the process of deriving the reference values and evaluating public health implications.

Author: Michael Jonathan Steinhauer

Publisher:

ISBN: NWU:35558002800676

Category:

Page: 123

View: 419

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the population, summarise the evidence relating sodium intake to elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases, and examine approaches to lower sodium intakes in populations for the benefit of public health.

Author: Judith L. Buttriss

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118660935

Category: Medical

Page: 456

View: 618

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In this second edition of the bestselling title from the acclaimed Nutrition Society Textbook series, Public Health Nutrition has been extensively revised to ensure that it reflects the latest evidence-based knowledge and research. Ground-breaking and comprehensive in both its scope and approach, Public Health Nutrition has been fully updated by an expert editorial team to cover the most recent changes in the field. It now offers a structured overview of the subject’s core concepts and considers public health nutrition tools and the application of intervention strategies. Divided into five key sections, Public Health Nutrition contains a wealth of information, including: Public health nutrition concepts and assessment tools, and their application in light of the latest evidence. Case studies to illustrate how best to apply the theory and evidence to policy and practice. An examination of nutrition throughout the lifecycle, and the relationship between diet and disease, including in relation to obesity, diabetes, cancer, as well as mental health. The impact of environmental factors on public health. Public health strategies, policies and approaches. With a clear and concise structure, Public Health Nutrition is an essential purchase for students of nutrition, dietetics and other healthcare areas, as well as an invaluable practical guide for health professionals working within public health. A supporting companion website featuring multiple-choice, short answer, and essay style questions is available at www.wiley.com/go/buttriss/publichealth
2017-04-11 By Judith L. Buttriss

The book reviews past and ongoing efforts to reduce the sodium content of the food supply and to motivate consumers to change behavior. Based on past lessons learned, the book makes recommendations for future initiatives.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 030915328X

Category:

Page:

View: 959

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Reducing the intake of sodium is an important public health goal for Americans. Since the 1970s, an array of public health interventions and national dietary guidelines has sought to reduce sodium intake. However, the U.S. population still consumes more sodium than is recommended, placing individuals at risk for diseases related to elevated blood pressure. Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake in the United States evaluates and makes recommendations about strategies that could be implemented to reduce dietary sodium intake to levels recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The book reviews past and ongoing efforts to reduce the sodium content of the food supply and to motivate consumers to change behavior. Based on past lessons learned, the book makes recommendations for future initiatives. It is an excellent resource for federal and state public health officials, the processed food and food service industries, health care professionals, consumer advocacy groups, and academic researchers. [Ed.] Le CD-ROM contient les annexes (pdf)
2010 By

The book is an important resource for federal public health officials and organizations, especially the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as medical professionals and community health workers.

Author: Institute of Medicine

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 9780309148092

Category: Medical

Page: 236

View: 106

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Hypertension is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, affecting nearly one in three Americans. It is prevalent in adults and endemic in the older adult population. Hypertension is a major contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and disability. Although there is a simple test to diagnose hypertension and relatively inexpensive drugs to treat it, the disease is often undiagnosed and uncontrolled. A Population-Based Policy and Systems Change Approach to the Prevention and Control Hypertension identifies a small set of high-priority areas in which public health officials can focus their efforts to accelerate progress in hypertension reduction and control. It offers several recommendations that embody a population-based approach grounded in the principles of measurement, system change, and accountability. The recommendations are designed to shift current hypertension reduction strategies from an individual-based approach to a population-based approach. They are also designed to improve the quality of care provided to individuals with hypertension and to strengthen the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's leadership in seeking a reduction in the sodium intake in the American diet to meet dietary guidelines. The book is an important resource for federal public health officials and organizations, especially the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as medical professionals and community health workers.
2010-08-13 By Institute of Medicine