Search Results for shooting-incident-reconstruction

This book will be of value to practicing forensic scientists (firearm and toolmark examiners), ballistics experts, crime scene personnel, police departments, forensic consultants (generalists), attorneys and judges, medical examiners ...

Author: Michael G. Haag

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 9780128193969

Category: Law

Page: 580

View: 542

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Shooting Incident Reconstruction, Third Edition, offers a thorough explanation of matters from simple to complex to help the reader understand the factors surrounding ballistics, trajectory, and shooting scenes. Forensic scientists, law enforcement, and crime scene investigators are often tasked with reconstruction of events based on crime scene evidence, along with the subsequent analysis of that evidence. The use and misuse of firearms to perpetrate crimes from theft to murder necessitates numerous invitations to reconstruct shooting incidents. The discharge of firearms and the behavior of projectiles create many forms of physical evidence that, through proper testing and interpretation by a skilled forensic scientist, can establish what did and what did not occur. Written by the world's most well-respected shooting scene and ballistics experts, the book addresses the terminology, science, and factors involved in reconstructing shooting incident events to solve forensic cases. It covers the full range of related topics including: the range from which a firearm was discharged; the sequence of shots in a multiple discharge shooting incident; the position of a firearm at the moment of discharge; and the position of a victim at the moment of impact. The probable flight path of a projectile and the manner in which a firearm was discharged are also discussed. Case studies illustrate real-world application of technical concepts, supported by over 200 full-color diagrams and photographs. This book will be of value to practicing forensic scientists (firearm and toolmark examiners), ballistics experts, crime scene personnel, police departments, forensic consultants (generalists), attorneys and judges, medical examiners (coroners), and forensic pathologists. New chapters on special reconstructive properties and value of shootings involving sub-machine guns or pseudo automatic firearms, rate of fire with special attention on shot-to-shot time intervals, human factors in shooting incidents Updated and revised glossary terms to fit with new technology and the emergence of standardization of terms by groups such as the Organization of Scientific Advisory Committees Provides clear practice standards and ethical guidelines for those involved in reconstructing shooting scenes
2020-10-10 By Michael G. Haag

The text also reviews basic firearm design, function, ammunition components, and the terminology required for understanding evidence encountered at the scene.

Author: Edward E. Hueske

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9781420038712

Category: Law

Page: 352

View: 102

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The ultimate goal of collecting, preserving, and examining physical evidence is individualization - associating each piece with its responsible source. Firearms evidence in particular has the potential to individualize its source. Accessible and comprehensive, Practical Analysis and Reconstruction of Shooting Incidents provides the foundation necessary to develop and sharpen the skills used to investigate shooting incidents. It provides an explanation of what constitutes pertinent evidence and appropriate results pertaining to autopsies, forensic laboratory analysis, and reenactments. The text also reviews basic firearm design, function, ammunition components, and the terminology required for understanding evidence encountered at the scene. The book explains the basic mathematics of shooting reconstruction and includes sample problems at the end of each chapter. It presents case studies that feature those involving the John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy assassinations. It also details proper photographic documentation and effective courtroom techniques used to present the results of shooting reconstructions to juries, with examples of acceptable demonstrative evidence. Arming the investigator with the means to successfully examine and evaluate what transpired at the scene, Practical Analysis and Reconstruction of Shooting Incidents is an important resource to have accessible at all times.
2005-11-29 By Edward E. Hueske

This workbook is designed to assist the Crime Scene Analyst, Technician or Investigator in documenting any bullet holes and or indentations that may be present at the crime scene.

Author: N. Leroy Parker

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781477297698

Category: Fiction

Page: 228

View: 209

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This workbook is designed to assist the Crime Scene Analyst, Technician or Investigator in documenting any bullet holes and or indentations that may be present at the crime scene. This documentation could be accomplished with overall, midrange and close-up photographs, rough sketches with the required measurement and notes. The workbook is also designed to assist the Crime Scene Analyst, Technician or Investigator in understanding the different ways of determining: a. The upward (inclined) or downward (sloped) bullet impact angles to the horizontal plane and the horizontal bullet impact angles, to the left or right when facing the surface with the bullet hole, that would be needed to reconstruct the shooting incident. b. The approximate location(s) of the muzzle of the gun at the time of the shooting. The determined or calculated bullet impact angle(s) to the horizontal plane could be used by the Crime Scene Analyst, Technician or Investigator to determine the horizontal distance(s) below the path of the bullet and the distance(s) the bullet(s) traveled from the muzzle of the gun to the hole(s) in the victim or object. These distances could then be used to determine / calculate the location of the shooter for any known or assumed muzzle height(s) based on the orientation of the shooter. Also, having the horizontal bullet impact angle the Crime Scene Analyst, Technician or Investigator could determine the perpendicular horizontal distance(s) from the muzzle of the gun to the surface with the bullet hole(s) and or indentation(s). A trajectory or shooting reconstruction could be accomplished by the utilization of one or more of the following methods. The emphasis of this workbook would be on the reconstruction of crime scene shooting incidents utilizing these methods: • Strings and dowels rods • Scaled drawings • Calculations using the trigonometric ratios • Computers programs The workbook would also provide the Crime Scene Analyst, Technician or Investigator with an opportunity to reconstruct and review fifteen real cases. More emphasis was placed on solution of these cases (which are located in the back of the book) by calculations using the trigonometric ratios and the Pythagorean Theorem since this method could be utilized to verify the accuracy of the other methods. Potentially, very valuable investigative information could be developed through a trajectory or shooting reconstruction of the crime scene that would assist the Analyst, Technician or Investigator when interviewing a subject to determine if he or she is truthful in the sequence of events or the manner in which the incident took place. Specific information may be logically inferred if the Crime Scene Analyst, Technician or Investigator is knowledgeable about trajectory or shooting reconstruction.
2013-01-08 By N. Leroy Parker

Beginning with the basic tools and terminology, the book explains what a crime scene investigator needs to look for and document in the quest for the truth.

Author: Dean Garrison

Publisher: Universal-Publishers

ISBN: 9781581125764

Category: Law

Page: 192

View: 389

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Early in the investigation of a shooting incident, proper crime scene work is critical to the final outcome. Whether the shooting is ruled to be an accident, a homicide, or suicide often depends heavily on the initial on-scene work-up. What photographs and which measurements will one need to thoroughly reconstruct the event? What information, if any, can be learned from the physical evidence and surrounding objects in a shooting crime? Beginning with the basic tools and terminology, the book explains what a crime scene investigator needs to look for and document in the quest for the truth.
2003 By Dean Garrison

Reconstruction considerations involving shotgun evidence 9. Crime reconstruction and shooting incidents Within the confines of this work, detailed descriptions of specific methods and procedures associated with shooting incident ...

Author: W. Jerry Chisum

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 9780123864611

Category: Social Science

Page: 704

View: 751

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Crime Reconstruction, Second Edition is an updated guide to the interpretation of physical evidence, written for the advanced student of forensic science, the practicing forensic generalist and those with multiple forensic specialists. It is designed to assist reconstructionists with understanding their role in the justice system; the development and refinement of case theory’ and the limits of physical evidence interpretation. Chisum and Turvey begin with chapters on the history and ethics of crime reconstruction and then shift to the more applied subjects of reconstruction methodology and practice standards. The volume concludes with chapters on courtroom conduct and evidence admissibility to prepare forensic reconstructionists for what awaits them when they take the witness stand. Crime Reconstruction, Second Edition, remains an unparalleled watershed collaborative effort by internationally known, qualified, and respected forensic science practitioner holding generations of case experience among them. Forensic pioneer such as W. Jerry Chisum, John D. DeHaan, John I. Thorton, and Brent E. Turvey contribute chapters on crime scene investigation, arson reconstruction, trace evidence interpretation, advanced bloodstain interpretation, and ethics. Other chapters cover the subjects of shooting incident reconstruction, interpreting digital evidence, staged crime scenes, and examiner bias. Rarely have so many forensic giants collaborated, and never before have the natural limits of physical evidence been made so clear. Updates to the majority of chapters, to comply with the NAS Report New chapters on forensic science, crime scene investigation, wound pattern analysis, sexual assault reconstruction, and report writing Updated with key terms, chapter summaries, discussion questions, and a comprehensive glossary; ideal for those teaching forensic science and crime reconstruction subjects at the college level Provides clear practice standards and ethical guidelines for the practicing forensic scientist
2011-08-09 By W. Jerry Chisum

Combining two bestselling Academic Press books, this essential bundle provides reference information for crime reconstruction professionals at a great price.

Author: Lucien C. Haag

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 0123748704

Category:

Page:

View: 877

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Combining two bestselling Academic Press books, this essential bundle provides reference information for crime reconstruction professionals at a great price. Shooting Incident Reconstruction is an investigator's one-stop reference for information on ballistics, trajectory, and shooting scenes! Crime Reconstruction is a working guide to the interpretation of physical evidence, designed for the forensic generalist and those with multiple forensic specialties.
2008-10-03 By Lucien C. Haag

Haag, L., Shooting Incident Reconstruction, Academic Press/Elsevier, Burlington, MA, 2006. Gardner, R. and Bevel, T., Practical Crime Scene Analysis and Reconstruction, Chapter 7 Shooting Scene Reconstruction, contributing author ...

Author: Ross M. Gardner

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9781351692380

Category: Law

Page: 405

View: 324

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Every action performed by a crime scene investigator has an underlying purpose: to both recover evidence and capture scene context. It is imperative that crime scene investigators must understand their mandate—not only as an essential function of their job but because they have the immense responsibility and duty to do so. Practice Crime Scene Processing and Investigation, Third Edition provides the essential tools for what crime scene investigators need to know, what they need to do, and how to do it. As professionals, any investigator’s master is the truth and only the truth. Professional ethics demands an absolute adherence to this mandate. When investigators can effectively seek, collect, and preserve information and evidence from the crime scene to the justice system—doing so without any agenda beyond seeking the truth— not only are they carrying out the essential function and duty of their job, it also increases the likelihood that the ultimate goal of true justice will be served. Richly illustrated—with more than 415 figures, including over 300 color photographs—the Third Edition of this best-seller thoroughly addresses the role of the crime scene investigator in the context of: Understanding the nature of physical evidence, including fingerprint, biological, trace, hair and fiber, impression, and other forms of evidence Assessing the scene, including search considerations and dealing with chemical and bioterror hazards Crime scene photography; scene sketching, mapping, and documentation; and the role of crime scene analysis and reconstruction Bloodstain pattern analysis and discussion of the body as a crime scene Special scene considerations, including fire, buried bodies, and entomological evidence Coverage details the importance of maintaining objectivity, emphasizing that every action the crime scene investigator performs has an underlying purpose: to both recover evidence and capture scene context. Key features: Outlines the responsibilities of the responding officer, from documenting and securing the initial information to providing emergency care Includes three new chapters on light technology and crime scene processing techniques, recovering fingerprints, and castings Addresses emerging technology and new techniques in 3-D Laser scanning procedures in capturing a scene Provides a list of review questions at the end of each chapter Practice Crime Scene Processing and Investigation, Third Edition includes practical, proven methods to be used at any crime scene to ensure that evidence is preserved, admissible in court, and persuasive. Course ancillaries including PowerPoint® lecture slides and a Test Bank are available with qualified course adoption.
2018-09-20 By Ross M. Gardner

Shooting. Incident. Reconstruction. After attending this presentation, participants will gain an understanding of the ... The case presented in this paper resulted in a complex shooting incident reconstruction in which wound paths, ...

Author: Prabhu TL

Publisher: NestFame Creations Pvt Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 134

View: 559

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Forensic science is the application of a broad spectrum of sciences to answer questions of interest to the legal system. Forensic science uses highly developed technologies to uncover scientific evidence in a variety of fields. The word forensic comes from the Latin word forensic (meaning “public”) and currently means “used in or suitable to courts of judicature or to public discussion or debate.” Forensic science is science used in public, in a court or in the justice system; so any science, used for the purposes of the law, is a forensic science. The Eureka legend of Archimedes (287 to 212 B.C.E.) can be considered an early account of the use of forensic science. By examining the principles of water displacement, Archimedes was able to prove that a crown was not made of gold (as it had been claimed) by its density and buoyancy. The use of fingerprints as a means to establish identity occurred during the seventh century. The use of medical evidence to determine the mode of death began as early as the 11th century in China and flourished in 16th-century Europe. The combination of a medical and legal approach to dealing with crimes used in the United States today had its origin in England in the 12th century, when King Richard I established the Office of the Coroner. The American colonists instituted the coroner system, which still exists today. There is no federal law requiring a coroner to be a licensed physician. Modern forensic science has a broad range of applications. It is used in civil cases such as forgeries, fraud or negligence. It can help law enforcement officials determine whether any laws or regulations have been violated in the marketing of foods and drinks, the manufacture of medicines or the use of pesticides on crops. It also can determine whether automobile emissions are within a permissible level and whether drinking water meets legal purity requirements. Forensic science is used in monitoring the compliance of various countries with such international agreements as the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Chemical Weapons Convention and to learn whether countries are developing secret nuclear weapons programs. However, forensic science most commonly is used to investigate criminal cases involving a victim, such as assault, robbery, kidnapping, rape or murder. The medical examiner is the central figure in an investigation of crimes involving victims. It is the responsibility of the medical examiner to visit the crime scene, conduct an autopsy (an examination of the body) in cases of death, examine the medical evidence and laboratory reports, study the victim’s medical history and put all that information together in a report to the district attorney, the public prosecuting officer within a defined district. Medical examiners usually are physicians specializing in forensic pathology, the study of structural and functional changes in the body as a result of injury. The medical examiner may call upon forensic scientists, who are specialists in these various fields for help investigating a crime. In criminal cases, forensic scientists often are involved in the search for and examination of physical traces that may be useful for establishing or excluding an association between someone suspected of committing a crime and the scene of the crime or victim. Such traces commonly include blood, other body fluids, hair, textile fibers from clothing, paint, glass, other building materials, footwear, tool and tire marks and flammable substances used to start fires. Sometimes the scientist will visit the scene itself to advise about the likely sequence of events and to join in the initial search for evidence. Other forensic scientists called toxicologists analyze a person’s bodily fluids, tissue and organs for drugs, poisons, alcohol and other substances. Yet others specialize in firearms, explosives or documents whose authenticity is questioned. One of the oldest techniques of forensic science is dusting the scene of a crime for fingerprints. Because no two fingerprints are the same, fingerprinting provides a positive means of identification. Computer technology now allows law enforcement officers to record fingerprints digitally and to transmit and receive fingerprint information electronically for rapid identification. DNA fingerprinting provides an excellent way to analyze blood, hair, skin or semen evidence found at the crime scene. By using an advanced technology method known as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a laboratory rapidly can clone, or multiply, the DNA from a tiny sample of any of these substances. This process produces enough DNA to compare with a sample of DNA taken from a suspected criminal. Forensic science today is a high-technology field using electron microscopes, lasers, ultraviolet and infrared light, advanced analytical chemical techniques and computerized databanks to analyze and research evidence. For example, blood-alcohol levels can be determined by actual blood tests, usually through gas chromatography. In this method, the blood sample is vaporized by high temperature and the gas is sent through a column that separates the various chemical compounds present in the blood. Gas chromatography permits the detection not only of alcohol but also of other drugs, such as barbiturates, cocaine, amphetamines and heroin. When a body is discovered in a lake, stream, river or ocean and the lungs are found to be filled with water, the medical examiner must determine if the drowning occurred where the body was found or elsewhere. A standard microscope that can magnify objects to 1,500 times their actual size is used to look for the presence or absence of diatoms, single-celled algae that are found in all natural bodies of water. The absence of diatoms raises the possibility that the drowning took place in a sink or bathtub, not where the body was found, since diatoms are filtered from household water during treatment. A scanning electron microscope that can magnify objects 100,000 times is used to detect the minute gunpowder particles present on the hand of a person who recently has fired a gun. These particles also can be analyzed chemically to identify their origin from a particular type of bullet. Forensic examination of substances found at a crime scene often can establish the presence of the suspect at the scene. Human bite marks also can serve as circumstantial evidence. Such bites may be found upon the body of a homicide victim or within pieces of food or other objects found at the crime scene, such as chewing gum. A forensic scientist can fill the impressions caused by these bites with liquid plastic. Upon hardening, the cast formed is an extremely accurate replica of the assailant’s teeth, which can be compared with a cast made from the teeth of the suspect.

Shooting Incident Reconstruction General considerations Shooting Incident Reconstruction encompasses all techniques and knowledge that can be applied when examining a crime scene. Haag has recently combined his knowledge and expertise ...

Author: Niamh Nic Daeid

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9781439826591

Category: Law

Page: 798

View: 193

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Every three years, worldwide forensics experts gather at the Interpol Forensic Science Symposium to exchange ideas and discuss scientific advances in the field of forensic science and criminal justice. Drawn from contributions made at the latest gathering in Lyon, France, Interpol's Forensic Science Review is a one-source reference providing a comp
2017-08-09 By Niamh Nic Daeid

Covers the ways that firearms and fingprints can provide information during a criminal investigation and be used as evidence in courtrooms.

Author: Edward E. Hueske

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 9780816055128

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 171

View: 216

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Covers the ways that firearms and fingprints can provide information during a criminal investigation and be used as evidence in courtrooms.