Search Results for scotland-the-dreich

"This book is a celebration of all that is dreich.

Author: Alan McCredie

Publisher:

ISBN: 1910745820

Category: Meteorology

Page: 128

View: 360

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"This book is a celebration of all that is dreich. There is nothing miserable about dreich. A sunny day has no more right to exist than a dreich one. Here, then, are fifty dreich images, accompanied by fifty equally dreich captions."--Provided by publisher.
2016 By Alan McCredie

This is a celebration of all that is braw, from the warmth of a Scottish pub to the beauty of the Highland hills, from sunbathing on a dual carriageway to weathering the Beast from the East. Dive into braw Scotland.

Author: Alan McCredie

Publisher:

ISBN: 1913025489

Category: Photography, Artistic

Page:

View: 899

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braw, adj. fine or fine-looking, excellent. This is a celebration of all that is braw, from the warmth of a Scottish pub to the beauty of the Highland hills, from sunbathing on a dual carriageway to weathering the Beast from the East. Dive into braw Scotland.
2019-11-15 By Alan McCredie

It is a prolonged love letter to floodlights in Ayr, ghost stadiums in Glasgow, pitch-invading oystercatchers in Grantown and all the rest.From Border to island, Premiership to Highland, here are the people and places that make Scottish ...

Author: ALAN. PALMER MCCREDIE (ALLY. GRAY, DANIEL.)

Publisher: Arena Sport

ISBN: 1913759008

Category:

Page: 192

View: 188

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From the lonely pitches of Eriskay to the great stadiums of our cities, Snapshot! captures the gritty, alluring essence of Scotland's national game.Alan McCredie's photographs combine with Daniel Gray's words to accompany the reader on a charismatic tour of Scottish football from Selkirk to Stornoway. Here is a rarely seen version of the country and its football culture, rich in detail, charm and eccentricity. It is a prolonged love letter to floodlights in Ayr, ghost stadiums in Glasgow, pitch-invading oystercatchers in Grantown and all the rest.From Border to island, Premiership to Highland, here are the people and places that make Scottish football - old pal fans in the rain, park players kicking and dreaming, fathers and daughters trudging dejectedly from the match, proud club shop proprietors, scraggy but loveable grounds with one grandstand and bustling stadiums of noble vintage.Snapshot! is a celebration of football and a portal into a different kind of Scotland.

The Scottish weather is rich in variety, full of lights and shades, drama, romance and beauty.

Author: Chris Robinson

Publisher: Black & White Publishing

ISBN: 9781845028237

Category: Reference

Page: 140

View: 350

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The Scottish weather is rich in variety, full of lights and shades, drama, romance and beauty. We have snow in winter, sunshine in summer, strong winds in spring and autumn and all four seasons can happen in one day. But, at least when it rains, the Scots tongue has myriad words to cheer you up while you are getting drenched. In Scottish Weather, Chris Robinson and Eileen Finlayson take a tour of the country to discover how we describe our weather conditions from coast to country and town to city. The weather is a constant topic of conversation in all our communities so whether it's dreich, smirry, hairst or simmer, Scottish Weather will help explain the weather around you.
2008-03-13 By Chris Robinson

described by the Scots word dreich. The minister referred to in Robert Wodrow's Analecta (1702) might not have been best pleased when In the midle of the ...

Author: Chris Robinson

Publisher: Black & White Publishing

ISBN: 9781845028244

Category: Reference

Page: 122

View: 712

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Scotland is a country brimful of beasties, and for every bird, animal and insect that you see as you travel through towns, farmland, mountains, glens, rivers, lochs and sea, the Scots language will provide a Scots word. In Scottish Wildlife, Chris Robinson of Scottish Language Dictionaries will introduce you to Big Beasties, Wee Beasties, Creepy-Crawlies and our Feathered Friends and will inform and entertain as she explains how they got their names, where to find them and how to recognise them. So welcome to the world of the coos, yowes, horney gollachs, blethering Tams and many, many more.
2008-03-13 By Chris Robinson

Might not some in the party be tempted to stress the sectoral “ Scottish interests ' case - and ... To conclude , there's a splendid Scots word ' dreich ' .

Author: Jonathan Tonge

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0714652245

Category: Political Science

Page: 280

View: 382

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Containing contributions from leading names in British politics, this review continues to publish front-rank research on parties, elections and voting behaviour in Britain.
2001 By Jonathan Tonge

Scots. speak. Scots. Perhaps James IV's curiosity is inspired by the fact that a ... Ane dreich nicht, the douce wee lassie gaed oot frae her hame in the ...

Author: Fiona Macdonald

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 9781908759191

Category: History

Page: 188

View: 273

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“Scots Wha Hae!” 'Scotland, A Very Peculiar History - Volume 2' is the concluding part of a lively and informative account of the vibrant history of Scotland, from the beginnings of Stewart rule up to modern-day Scotland. Celebrating the many and varied cultural and historic achievements of the Scottish, from the fierce Jacobite uprising to John Logie Baird's insulating socks, this ebook provides an objective account of the nation's chequered (or rather, 'tartaned') history. You'll also find fact boxes, quotes, poetry and unbelievable recipes to share with your family and friends (although we'd advise that some old recipes are only fit for reading)!
2011-12-13 By Fiona Macdonald

University of Glasgow, Dictionary of the Scots Language <padmanaban>www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/dreich>padmanaban 47 James McGranaran, 'Introductory Notes', ...

Author: Frances Wilkins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351847414

Category: Music

Page: 300

View: 773

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Following three years of ethnomusicological fieldwork on the sacred singing traditions of evangelical Christians in North-East Scotland and Northern Isles coastal communities, Frances Wilkins documents and analyses current singing practices in this book by placing them historically and contemporaneously within their respective faith communities. In ascertaining who the singers were and why, when, where, how and what they chose to sing, the study explores a number of related questions. How has sacred singing contributed to the establishment and reinforcement of individual and group identities both in the church and wider community? What is the process by which specific regional repertoires and styles develop? Which organisations and venues have been particularly conducive to the development of sacred singing in the community? How does the subject matter of songs relate to the immediate environment of coastal inhabitants? How and why has gospel singing in coastal communities changed? These questions are answered with comprehensive reference to interview material, fieldnotes, videography and audio field recordings. As one of the first pieces of ethnomusicological research into sacred music performance in Scotland, this ethnography draws important parallels between practices in the North East and elsewhere in the British Isles and across the globe.
2018-01-17 By Frances Wilkins

Dreich. (Scots). SCOTLAND HAS PROVIDED many valued benefits to the world, ranging from porridge to penicillin, Scotch whisky to the steam engine, ...

Author: Andrew Taylor

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781473526372

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 208

View: 521

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Do you ever search in vain for exactly the right word? Perhaps you want to articulate the vague desire to be far away. Or you can’t quite convey that odd urge to go outside and check to see if anyone is coming. Maybe you’re struggling to express there being just the right amount of something – not too much, but not too little. While the English may not have a word for it, the good news is that the Greeks, the Norwegians, the Dutch or possibly the Inuits probably do. Whether it’s the Norwegian forelsket (that feeling of euphoria at the start of a love affair) or the Indonesian jayus (a joke so poorly told and so unfunny that you can’t help but laugh), this delightful smörgåsbord of wonderful words from around the world will come to the rescue when the English language fails. Part glossary, part amusing musings, but wholly enlightening and entertaining, The Greeks Had a Word For It means you’ll never again be lost for just the right word.
2015-10-01 By Andrew Taylor

Curiously, the Scotland of the dreich Glasgow pub was also a land rich in song and story. Ifsomeof the stories tended to glorify dreich pubs withrules ...

Author: Philip Hills

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781780577883

Category: Cooking

Page: 192

View: 181

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This is a book in which Scots tell the truth about their national drink. Ignoring the mythology which surrounds Scotland and her favourite tipple, it is written by people who are passionate about their subject, who know what they write about and who love what they know. It is about whisky and about Scotland - the real Scotland behind the invented one of the advertisers and the gift shops. Over the last 40 years Scots have reasserted their spiritual and cultural independence, and as part of this process they have redicovered the unique quality of their national drink. This renaissance not is a cause for celebrations not only by Scots but also by the rest of the world. Malt whiskies have risen from a minority taste in a small nation to become internationally recognised as the connoisseur's spirit par excellence. Contributors include acclaimed writers Ruth Wishart, George Rosie, Trevor Royle, Colin McArthur, Alan Bold and Derek Cooper; Russell Sharp, formerly chief chemist at Chivas and now president of the Caledonian Brewing Company; and poets Hamish Henderson, Hugh MacDiarmid and Norman McCaig.
2012-12-21 By Philip Hills

... the English lower orders didn't like being ruled by dreich Scottish prime ministers, and Highland troops had become a decisive part of the British army.

Author: Edwin Moore

Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd

ISBN: 9780857899330

Category: Reference

Page: 300

View: 370

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As the proud possessors of a fiercely independent creative heritage, the Scots were a race apart even before Hadrian built the wall. Scotland has produced an indomitable bunch of fighters, builders, thinkers and drinkers, poets, players and pedagogues that have shaped the course of modern history. Scotland: 1,001 Things You Need To Know is the real McCoy, a comprehensive guide to Caledonia and its remarkable people.
2012-06-01 By Edwin Moore

Dreich is a horrid, wet, miserable day, and it's only used in connection with weather. And we know it (perhaps) as dree, which, although it has a related ...

Author: David McFadden

Publisher: McClelland & Stewart

ISBN: 9780771061363

Category: Travel

Page: 329

View: 544

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In 1995, David W. McFadden published An Innocent in Ireland: Curious Rambles and Singular Encounters, a quirky and affectionate account of his travels around Ireland. In undertaking the trip, he chose as his guide H. V. Morton, the prolific travel writer of the 1920s and 1930s, whose In Search of Ireland (part of Morton’s famous In Search of... series) had been familiar to him since childhood. Now, setting out to explore Scotland, his family’s ancestral home, McFadden plans to use the same technique: to follow Morton’s route around the country, observing how things have changed and in what ways they remain the same. As in An Innocent in Ireland, however, his own inquiring mind and engaging personality take over, and Morton appears less and less as McFadden becomes increasingly absorbed by the landscape – and particularly by the people. Starting in the Lowlands, he travels through Burns country (examining verses that Burns is alleged to have inscribed on a Dumfries window with his diamond ring) and up the east coast to the Highlands. There he lingers by Loch Ness (spotting nothing but tourists), before heading over to the west coast and falling in love with it – particularly with the islands of Mull and Iona. Through the entire trip, McFadden charts an erratic course, led only by H. V. Morton and his own acute eye and very lively curiosity. As he does so, he records his extremely personal impressions, which are wry, amused – and often more astute than he lets on. The reader won’t find many of the traditional Scottish tourist sites in this account. Rather, as in An Innocent in Ireland, McFadden loves a good chat, and he wisely lets the many characters he meets speak for themselves. He gives generous attention to a variety of talkative barmen, hoteliers, shopkeepers, as well as to passersby that he encounters in the course of his travels. Their conversations, ranging from the instructive or humorous to the eccentric and even surreal, give a thoroughly entertaining view of a Scotland the guidebooks never reveal. Still quirky, affectionate, always ready to be intrigued or amused, David McFadden makes an ideal companion for any armchair traveller.
2016-12-06 By David McFadden

Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 2, University of Würzburg (Anglistik und Amerikanistik), course: Sociolinguistics, 25 entries in the bibliography, language: ...

Author: Sydne Pruonto

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783638748902

Category:

Page: 28

View: 134

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Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 2, University of Wurzburg (Anglistik und Amerikanistik), course: Sociolinguistics, 25 entries in the bibliography, language: English, comment: This seminar paper is about linguistic variations Scottish English has in contrast to Standard English concerning pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary as well as it deals with the history of Scottish English and attitudes which Scottish English perceives from society., abstract: This seminar paper is about linguistic variations Scottish English has in contrast to Standard English concerning pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary as well as it deals with the history of Scottish English and attitudes which Scottish English perceives from society."
2007-10 By Sydne Pruonto

It would still take a later, Romantic eye to see anything beautiful about Ben Lawers on a dreich Scottish day, unless it were to be the sight of rare ...

Author: Ian R Mitchell

Publisher: Luath Press Ltd

ISBN: 9781909912441

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 224

View: 677

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Winner of the Outdoor Writers Guild Award for Excellence In this new book on pre-mountaineering ascents and near ascents in the Highlands, we have at last a work which does justice to those who lived and worked, travelled and fought in the Highlands before Walter Scott. PROF. BRUCE LENMAN Marvelous account of mountaineering's prehistory... as colourful as it is thought provoking - THE SCOTSMAN This work tells the story of explorations and ascents in the Scottish Highlands in the days before mountaineering became a popular sport - when Jacobites, bandits, poachers and illicit distillers traditionally used the mountains as sanctuary.
2013-08-26 By Ian R Mitchell

Some people think that the Scots are miserable, dour and dreich, a bit like our weather. They point to Andy Murray as a typically morose Scotsman droning ...

Author: Rod Green

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 9781789290325

Category: Humor

Page:

View: 731

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What is it about Scotland that people love so much? Scotland is famous for many things, as any Scotsman will happily tell you. The list of Scottish inventions is as long as Loch Ness, stretching from penicillin and the telephone to Irn Bru and Grand Theft Auto but, while that Scotsman is busy explaining how Scotland gave the world whisky, television and Long John Silver, spare a thought for the nation and its people. The Scots are a peculiar race with characters as varied and changeable as the unpredictable Scottish weather. In Scotland people will tell you that they love the summer, it's one of the best days of the year, and that wry sense of humour is what inspires The Wicked Wit of Scotland. This funny and beautifully observed book pulls together stories, quotes, quips and anecdotes from Scots talking about Scotland and others from all over the world relating what they most admire about the country that Harry Potter author J. K. Rowling described as 'one of the most hauntingly beautiful places in the world. The history is fascinating, the men are handsome and the whisky is delicious. But don't eat the macaroni pies.' Featuring wit and wisdom from writers such as Armando Iannucci and Compton Mackenzie, Stanley Baxter and Neil Munro, the sometimes dubious delights of Scottish cuisine are discussed, along with the culture, folklore, politics and sport that will help us to understand just what makes Scotland tick.
2018-11-01 By Rod Green

... you. dreich (now most usually applied to the weather) miserable, depressing, bleak: a typical dreich November day; no other word, whether in Scots or ...

Author: Betty Kirkpatrick

Publisher: Crombie Jardine Publishing

ISBN: 9781848398054

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 160

View: 123

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A concise but comprehensive collection of Scottish words and phrases.
2006-10-01 By Betty Kirkpatrick

A dreich road , S. In this sense To DREEL , v . n . 1. To move quickly ; to run in haste ; A. Bor . dree is used ; “ long , seeming tedious beyond Ang ...

Author: John Jamieson

Publisher:

ISBN: BSB:BSB10523092

Category:

Page:

View: 843

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1841 By John Jamieson

A dreich road , S. In this sense To DREEL , v . n . 1. To move quickly ; to run in haste ; A. Bor . dree is used ; " long , seeming tedious beyond Ang ...

Author: John Jamieson

Publisher:

ISBN: CHI:097058565

Category: English language

Page: 716

View: 890

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1840 By John Jamieson

2,000 Years of Scottish History by Those Who Saw It Happen Rosemary Goring ... It was a dreich day and umbrellas were out to protect heads against the ...

Author: Rosemary Goring

Publisher: Abrams

ISBN: 9781468303124

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 710

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A vivid, wide-ranging, and engrossing account of Scotland's history, composed of timeless stories by those who experienced it first-hand. Contributors range from Tacitus, Mary, Queen of Scots, and Oliver Cromwell to Adam Smith, David Livingstone, and Billy Connolly. These include not only historic moments-from Bannockburn to the opening of the new Parliament in 1999-but also testimonies like that of the eight-year-old factory worker who was dangled by his ear out of a third-floor window for making a mistake, the survivors of the 1746 Battle of Culloden, who wished perhaps that they had died on the field, John Logie Baird, inventor of television, and great writers including Conan Doyle, Robert Louis Stevenson, and the editor of Encyclopedia Britannica. From the battlefield to the sports field, this is living, accessible history told by criminals, servants, housewives, poets, journalists, nurses, prisoners, comedians, and many more.
2009-12-29 By Rosemary Goring

Scotland since 1880 Ewen Cameron ... about economic matters.103 As Neal Ascherson commented, 'If this is a dreich colourless election the Scots made it so.

Author: Ewen Cameron

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748628254

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 618

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Ewen Cameron explores the political debate between unionism, liberalism, socialism and nationalism, and the changing political relationship between Scotland and the United Kingdom. He sets Scottish experience alongside the Irish, Welsh and European, and considers British dimensions of historical change--involvement in two world wars, imperial growth and decline, for example - from a Scottish perspective. He relates political events to trends and movements in the economy, culture and society of the nation's regions--borders, lowlands, highlands, and islands. Underlying the history, and sometimes impelling its ambitions, are the evolution and growth of national self-confidence and identity which fundamentally affected Scotland's destiny in the last century. Dr Cameron ends by considering how such forces may transform it in this one. Like the period it describes this book has politics at its heart. The recent upsurge of scholarship and publication, backed by the author's extensive primary research, underpin its vivid and well-paced narrative.
2010-03-30 By Ewen Cameron

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