Search Results for nutrient-acquisition-by-plants

J.P. Lynch 7.1 Introduction Excavation of plants from soil readily reveals that the shape of root systems is quite ... Although the focus of this chapter is the role of root architecture in nutrient acquisition , root architecture can ...

Author: Hormoz BassiriRad

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3540241868

Category: Nature

Page: 372

View: 546

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This is an integrated review of the mechanisms controlling plant nutrient uptake and how plants respond to changes in the environment. Among key topics covered are: soil nutrient bioavailability; root responses to variations in nutrient supply; nitrogen fixation; root architecture; life span; mycorrhizae; responses to climate change. The book helps us understand the mechanisms that govern present-day plant communities and to predict the response of plants to a changing climate.
2005-05-20 By Hormoz BassiriRad

This book presents an excellent overview and summary of new concepts of plant nutrient acquisition mechanisms, and sets forth their practical implications in crop production.

Author: N. Ae

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9784431669029

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 520

View: 598

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New research reveals that plants actively acquire nutrients; the acquisition process is not a passive one in which plants simply wait for dissolved nutrients to come closer to their roots. In fact plants play a far more active role than once was understood to be possible in nutrient acquisition and in adaptation to problem soils. This book presents an excellent overview and summary of new concepts of plant nutrient acquisition mechanisms, and sets forth their practical implications in crop production. The scope is wide ranging, from biochemical, molecular, and genetic analysis of nutrient acquisition to global nutritional problems. Especially noteworthy are the sections on the cell apoplast, phosphorus-solubilizing organisms, and direct uptake of macro-organic molecules. With contributions by leading scientists worldwide, the book provides an invaluable resource for researchers in plant and environmental sciences and in agronomy and other branches of agriculture.
2013-11-11 By N. Ae

This is an integrated review of the mechanisms controlling plant nutrient uptake and how plants respond to changes in the environment.

Author: Hormoz BassiriRad

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9783540276753

Category: Science

Page: 348

View: 589

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This is an integrated review of the mechanisms controlling plant nutrient uptake and how plants respond to changes in the environment. Among key topics covered are: soil nutrient bioavailability; root responses to variations in nutrient supply; nitrogen fixation; root architecture; life span; mycorrhizae; responses to climate change. The book helps us understand the mechanisms that govern present-day plant communities and to predict the response of plants to a changing climate.
2005-12-30 By Hormoz BassiriRad

However, data on P and Zn uptake by mycorrhizal plants are still contradictory. ... different species of AMF differ in the uptake effectiveness of P and Zn, because uptake of both nutrients in mycorrhizal plants were not correlated.

Author: - Yusran

Publisher: Cuvillier Verlag

ISBN: 9783736931107

Category: Science

Page: 280

View: 105

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Soilborne diseases result in tremendous economic losses of agricultural production and many of the diseases cannot be controlled effectively by presently accepted chemical prevention practices. Hence, scientific research is required to achieve alternatives to chemical methods. Biocontrol strategies including the application of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) could be a promising alternative. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are regarded as an important factor for the uptake of phosphorus (P) and other relatively immobile nutrients particularly in low input systems. Furthermore, AMF support healthy growth of plants and are involved in the resistance against toxic elements and in suppression of pathogens. However, mycorrhization with AMF is frequently very limited. Large scale soil inoculation with appropriate AMF is usually not practicable. The application of beneficial PGPRs to improve root infection with indigenous, site adapted AMF might be a promising alternative.
2009-10-02 By - Yusran

Nutrient acquisition is thus expensive in terms of both energy and carbon , and draws upon a sizeable fraction of photoassimilate . On nutrient - rich sites , vascular plants might expend less than a third of their fixed carbon on root ...

Author: Brian James Atwell

Publisher: Macmillan Education AU

ISBN: 0732944392

Category: Reference

Page: 708

View: 738

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Accompanying CD-ROM includes 600 figures, tables and color plates from the book Plants in action which can be used for the production of color transparencies or for projections in lectures.

perfect estimators of the plant-available pool of nutrients and available forms of nutrient can change after a soil sample has ... Plant. nutrient. acquisition. Root geometry Nitrate is a mobile ion in the soil while Zn and Cu ions are ...

Author: Kenneth Ian Peverill

Publisher: CSIRO PUBLISHING

ISBN: 9780643063761

Category: Science

Page: 369

View: 639

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Soil Analysis: An Interpretation Manual is a practical guide to soil tests. It considers what soil tests are, when they can be used reliably and consistently, and discusses what limits their application. It is the first nationally accepted publication that is appropriate for Australian soils and conditions. The first three chapters review the general principles and concepts of soil testing, factors affecting soil test interpretation and soil sampling and handling procedures. The next two chapters describe morphological indicators of soil and include colour plates of major Australian agricultural soils. These are followed by a series of chapters which present soil test calibration data for individual elements or a related group of tests such as the range of soil tests used to interpret soil acidity. Each of these chapters also summarises the reactions of the particular element or parameter in the soil and describes the tests commonly used in Australia. The final chapter presents a structured approach to nutrient management and making fertiliser recommendations using soil test data. The manual will be of particular interest to soil and environmental scientists, farm advisers, consultants and primary producers who will find the manual an essential reference to understanding and interpreting soil test data. Many of the soil tests evaluated in the book are used throughout the world. Soil Analysis: An Interpretation Manual was commissioned and developed by the Australian Soil and Plant Analysis Council (ASPAC). It comprises the work of 37 experts, which has been extensively peer reviewed.
1999-01-01 By Kenneth Ian Peverill

That is, in plants of Australian semi-arid mulga woodlands, the NO3— concentration in the tissue tends to be high and ... Rates of nutrient uptake depend on the quantity of root surface area and the uptake properties of this surface.

Author: Hans Lambers

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387783415

Category: Science

Page: 605

View: 402

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Box 9E. 1 Continued FIGURE 2. The C–S–R triangle model (Grime 1979). The strategies at the three corners are C, competiti- winning species; S, stress-tolerating s- cies; R,ruderalspecies. Particular species can engage in any mixture of these three primary strategies, and the m- ture is described by their position within the triangle. comment briefly on some other dimensions that Grime’s (1977) triangle (Fig. 2) (see also Sects. 6. 1 are not yet so well understood. and 6. 3 of Chapter 7 on growth and allocation) is a two-dimensional scheme. A C—S axis (Com- tition-winning species to Stress-tolerating spe- Leaf Economics Spectrum cies) reflects adaptation to favorable vs. unfavorable sites for plant growth, and an R- Five traits that are coordinated across species are axis (Ruderal species) reflects adaptation to leaf mass per area (LMA), leaf life-span, leaf N disturbance. concentration, and potential photosynthesis and dark respiration on a mass basis. In the five-trait Trait-Dimensions space,79%ofallvariation worldwideliesalonga single main axis (Fig. 33 of Chapter 2A on photo- A recent trend in plant strategy thinking has synthesis; Wright et al. 2004). Species with low been trait-dimensions, that is, spectra of varia- LMA tend to have short leaf life-spans, high leaf tion with respect to measurable traits. Compared nutrient concentrations, and high potential rates of mass-based photosynthesis. These species with category schemes, such as Raunkiaer’s, trait occur at the ‘‘quick-return’’ end of the leaf e- dimensions have the merit of capturing cont- nomics spectrum.
2008-10-08 By Hans Lambers

The controls over nutrient uptake and loss by Annual nutrient loss from vegetation is greatest stands of vegetation are basically the same as those in high - nutrient environments where NPP and described for individual plants ( Sect .

Author: H. Lambers

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387983260

Category: Science

Page: 540

View: 103

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The growth, reproduction and geographical distribution of plants are profoundly influenced by their physiological ecology: the interaction with the surrounding physical, chemical and biological environments. This textbook is notable in emphasizing that the mechanisms underlying plant physiological ecology can be found at the levels of biochemistry, biophysics, molecular biology and whole-plant physiology. At the same time, the integrative power of physiological ecology is well-suited to assess the costs, benefits and consequences of modifying plants for human needs, and to evaluate the role of plants in ecosystems.Plant Physiological Ecology begins with the primary processes of carbon metabolism and transport, plant-water relations, and energy balance. After considering individual leaves and whole plants, these physiological processes are then scaled up to the level of the canopy. Subsequent chapters discuss mineral nutrition and the ways in which plants cope with nutrient-deficient or toxic soils. The book then looks at patterns of growth and allocation, life-history traits, and interactions between plants and other organisms. Later chapters deal with traits that affect decomposition of plant material and with plant physiological ecology at the level of ecosystems and global environmental processes.Plant Physiological Ecology features numerous boxed entries that provide extended discussions of selected issues, a glossary, and numerous references to the primary and review literature. The significant new text is suitable for use in plant ecology courses, as well as classes ranging from plant physiology to plant molecular biology.
1998 By H. Lambers

J.J. Adu-Gyamfi (Ed.), Food security in nutrient-stressed environments: exploiting plants' genetic capabilities: 201–213 ... Thus, environments which are naturally very acidic can pose a challenge to nutrient acquisition by plant roots, ...

Author: J.J. Adu-Gyamfi

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401715706

Category: Science

Page: 344

View: 125

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Ultimate success in exploiting the genetic capabilities of plants to grow in nutrient-stressed environments of the semi-arid tropics (SAT) requires a holistic view of food systems to ensure that genetic selections for improved yields on nutrient-poor soils will actually be adopted by farmers. This book sets out to address the important issue of how physiological mechanisms of nutrient uptake can best be combined with genetic options to improve the adaptation of crops to low-nutrient availability, thereby enhancing productivity of nutrient poor soils in the semi-arid tropics. The book examines (i) the sustainability of breeding for low-nutrient environments from the viewpoint of three interrelated disciplines; physiology, breeding, and socio-economics, (ii) candidate mechanisms and physiological traits to enhance uptake and utilization efficiencies, (iii) genetic approaches for manipulation of crop plants to enhance root exudation and access nutrients in the rhizosphere, and (iv) field practices and farmers' preferences for crop varieties grown in low-nutrient environments. Finally, the role of modelling in improving nutrient efficiency in cropping systems, recommendations for future research needs and strategies were highlighted. Attended by 50 international participants, this book is the outcome of the workshop held at ICRISAT-India during 27-30 September 1999 to mark the culmination of the Government of Japan/ICRISAT Project.
2013-06-29 By J.J. Adu-Gyamfi

Plant associated soil microbial communities play a critical role in productivity of Earth's ecosystems as they ensure cycling of key elements.

Author: Somak Chowdhury

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1263336007

Category:

Page:

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Plant associated soil microbial communities play a critical role in productivity of Earth's ecosystems as they ensure cycling of key elements. Specifically, plant biodiversity losses alters soil microbial communities and can have significant consequences for plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. Across a biodiversity gradient this thesis found that bacterial communities are uncoupled from plant diversity. However, specific groups of bacteria respond to changes in plant diversity. Plant and soil factors clearly favoured different bacterial groups and notably on the lines of their growth strategies, with plants selecting fast growing species and negatively influencing groups that are antagonistic and slow growing. Furthermore, plant diversity not only altered fungal diversity but demonstrated specific effects on fungal guilds. Due to the highlighted importance of fungal association a pot experiment controlling for AMF association was also carried out to observe effects of the fungal association on decomposition of stoichiometrically similar organic matter types and examine carbon-nitrogen trade between plant and associated microbial community. Arbuscular mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) associated plants allocated more carbon to their roots but due to assistance of AMF incurred a lower cost of nutrient acquisition. Additionally, distinct microbial communities were fostered in presence of symbiotic fungal associations possibly explaining the amount of carbon used for exchange of nutrients from decomposing organic matter. In conclusion, the data compiled in this thesis shows plant diversity and their microbial association related traits are important modifiers of soil microbial communities. In summary, in a multispecies environment microbial associations are a fundamental part of efficient nutrient acquisition from decomposing organic matter in soil.
2021 By Somak Chowdhury