Search Results for native-colonialism

Author: Yirga Gelaw Woldeyes

Publisher:

ISBN: 1569025096

Category:

Page:

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This timely book highlights significant colonial patterns of domination and their effects, as well as responses and resistance to colonialism.

Author: Colin Samson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781509514571

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 951

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Indigenous peoples have gained increasing international visibility in their fight against longstanding colonial occupation by nation-states. Although living in different locations around the world and practising highly varied ways of life, indigenous peoples nonetheless are affected by similar patterns of colonial dispossession and violence. In defending their collective rights to self-determination, culture, lands and resources, their resistance and creativity offer a pause for critical reflection on the importance of maintaining indigenous distinctiveness against the homogenizing forces of states and corporations. This timely book highlights significant colonial patterns of domination and their effects, as well as responses and resistance to colonialism. It brings indigenous peoples' issues and voices to the forefront of sociological discussions of modernity. In particular, the book examines issues of identity, dispossession, environment, rights and revitalization in relation to historical and ongoing colonialism, showing that the experiences of indigenous peoples in wealthy and poor countries are often parallel and related. With a strong comparative scope and interdisciplinary perspective, the book is an essential introductory reading for students interested in race and ethnicity, human rights, development and indigenous peoples' issues in an interconnected world.
2016-12-16 By Colin Samson

Broad in scope and groundbreaking in the topics it explores, this volume presents fresh insights from scholars devoted to understanding Native American identity in meaningful and methodologically innovative ways. ¾

Author: Gregory D. Smithers

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803255296

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 237

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The arrival of European settlers in the Americas disrupted indigenous lifeways, and the effects of colonialism shattered Native communities. Forced migration and human trafficking created a diaspora of cultures, languages, and people. Gregory D. Smithers and Brooke N. Newman have gathered the work of leading scholars, including Bill Anthes, Duane Champagne, Daniel Cobb, Donald Fixico, and Joy Porter, among others, in examining an expansive range of Native peoples and the extent of their influences through reaggregation. These diverse and wide-ranging essays uncover indigenous understandings of self-identification, community, and culture through the speeches, cultural products, intimate relations, and political and legal practices of Native peoples. ¾Native Diasporas explores how indigenous peoples forged a sense of identity and community amid the changes wrought by European colonialism in the Caribbean, the Pacific Islands, and the mainland Americas from the seventeenth through the twentieth century. Broad in scope and groundbreaking in the topics it explores, this volume presents fresh insights from scholars devoted to understanding Native American identity in meaningful and methodologically innovative ways. ¾
2014-06-01 By Gregory D. Smithers

In reconsidering Native adaptation and resistance to colonial British rule, Ferris reviews five centuries of interaction that are usually read as a single event viewed through the lens of historical bias.

Author: Neal Ferris

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816502387

Category: Social Science

Page: 226

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In reconsidering Native adaptation and resistance to colonial British rule, Ferris reviews five centuries of interaction that are usually read as a single event viewed through the lens of historical bias. He first examines patterns of traditional lifeway continuity among the Ojibwa, demonstrating their ability to maintain seasonal mobility up to the mid-nineteenth century and their adaptive response to its loss. He then looks at the experience of refugee Delawares, who settled among the Ojibwa as a missionary-sponsored community yet managed to maintain an identity distinct from missionary influences. And he shows how the archaeological history of the Six Nations Iroquois reflected patterns of negotiating emergent colonialism when they returned to the region in the 1780s, exploring how families managed tradition and the contemporary colonial world to develop innovative ways of revising and maintaining identity.
2011-10 By Neal Ferris

Cole Harris analyzes the impact of reserves on Native lives and livelihoods and considers how, in light of this, the Native land question might begin to be resolved.

Author: R. Cole Harris

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 9780774842136

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 527

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This elegantly written and insightful book provides a geographical history of the Indian reserve in British Columbia. Cole Harris analyzes the impact of reserves on Native lives and livelihoods and considers how, in light of this, the Native land question might begin to be resolved. The account begins in the early nineteenth-century British Empire and then follows Native land policy - and Native resistance to it - in British Columbia from the Douglas treaties in the early 1850s to the formal transfer of reserves to the Dominion in 1938.
2011-11-01 By R. Cole Harris

"Aloha Betrayed" offers a devastating critique of colonial historiography and, crucially, a firm foundation for nation-building."--Gary Y. Okihiro, author of "Common Ground: Reimagining American History"

Author: Noenoe K. Silva

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 082233349X

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 316

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DIVAn historical account of native Hawaiian encounters with and resistance to American colonialism, based on little-read Hawaiian-language sources./div
2004-09-07 By Noenoe K. Silva

Author: Lena Johansson de Château

Publisher:

ISBN: 9150620606

Category: Africa, North

Page: 194

View: 620

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This is a brilliant history of anthropology from its origins in 19th century Europe to the present day.

Author: Patrick Wolfe

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780304703401

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 411

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This is a brilliant history of anthropology from its origins in 19th century Europe to the present day. Underlying this and closely connected to this meta-narrative is the story of European settlement and colonialization of Australia and the distressing history of Australian official policy towards the Australian aboriginal population (other colonial enterprises are also examined; for instance, the book incorporates a discussion of the late 19th century development of American cultural anthropology and its relation to the European settlement of North America). He shows how anthropological theory emerged from the political and intellectual culture of Victorian England (and to a lesser extent Germany and the United States) and examines its relationship to science, particularly evolutionary science.
1999 By Patrick Wolfe

This book follows imperialism into the present, demonstrating how pursuit of knowledge of the natural world impacts, and is impacted by, indigenous peoples rather than nation-states.

Author: Laurelyn Whitt

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139479479

Category: Law

Page:

View: 123

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At the intersection of indigenous studies, science studies, and legal studies lies a tense web of political issues of vital concern for the survival of indigenous nations. Numerous historians of science have documented the vital role of late-eighteenth- and nineteenth-century science as a part of statecraft, a means of extending empire. This book follows imperialism into the present, demonstrating how pursuit of knowledge of the natural world impacts, and is impacted by, indigenous peoples rather than nation-states. In extractive biocolonialism, the valued genetic resources, and associated agricultural and medicinal knowledge, of indigenous peoples are sought, legally converted into private intellectual property, transformed into commodities, and then placed for sale in genetic marketplaces. Science, Colonialism, and Indigenous Peoples critically examines these developments, demonstrating how contemporary relations between indigenous and Western knowledge systems continue to be shaped by the dynamics of power, the politics of property, and the apologetics of law.
2009-08-24 By Laurelyn Whitt

Exploring the morally entangled territory of language and race in 18th- and 19th-century America, Sean Harvey shows that whites’ theories of an “Indian mind” inexorably shaped by Indian languages played a crucial role in the ...

Author: Sean P. Harvey

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674289932

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 401

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Exploring the morally entangled territory of language and race in 18th- and 19th-century America, Sean Harvey shows that whites’ theories of an “Indian mind” inexorably shaped by Indian languages played a crucial role in the subjugation of Native peoples and informed the U.S. government’s efforts to extinguish Native languages for years to come.
2015-01-05 By Sean P. Harvey

Author: Lena Johansson de Château

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:185998414

Category: Africa, North

Page: 181

View: 510

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This scholarly collection explores the method and theory of the archaeological study of indigenous persistence and long-term colonial entanglement.

Author: Heather Law Pezzarossi

Publisher: University of New Mexico Press

ISBN: 9780826360434

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 784

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This scholarly collection explores the method and theory of the archaeological study of indigenous persistence and long-term colonial entanglement. Each contributor offers an examination of the complex ways that indigenous communities in the Americas have navigated the circumstances of colonial and postcolonial life, which in turn provides a clearer understanding of anthropological concepts of ethnogenesis and hybridity, survivance, persistence, and refusal. Indigenous Persistence in the Colonized Americas highlights the unique ability of historical anthropology to bring together various kinds of materials—including excavated objects, documents in archives, and print and oral histories—to provide more textured histories illuminated by the archaeological record. The work also extends the study of historical archaeology by tracing indigenous societies long after their initial entanglement with European settlers and colonial regimes. The contributors engage a geographic scope that spans Spanish, English, French, Dutch, and other models of colonization.
2019-06-30 By Heather Law Pezzarossi

Argues that North American settler colonialism included episodes of genocide of Indigenous peoples as defined by the United Nations Genocide Convention.

Author: Laurelyn Whitt

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108425506

Category: History

Page: 225

View: 560

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Argues that North American settler colonialism included episodes of genocide of Indigenous peoples as defined by the United Nations Genocide Convention.
2019-08 By Laurelyn Whitt

This provocative book adds and interesting twist and nuance to our understanding of the five-hundred year interchange between American Indians and others.

Author: Maureen Trudelle Schwarz

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438445946

Category: HISTORY

Page: 247

View: 104

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"Explores how American Indian businesses and organizations are taking on images that were designed to oppress them. How and why do American Indians appropriate images of Indians for their own purposes? How do these representatives promote and sometimes challenge sovereignty for indigenous people locally and nationally? American Indians have recently taken on a new relationship with the hegemonic culture designed to oppress them. Rather than protesting it, they are earmarking images from it and using them for their own ends. This provocative book adds an interesting twist and nuance to our understanding of the five-hundred year interchange between American Indians and others. A host of examples of how American Indians use the so-called "White Man's Indian" reveal the key images and issues selected most frequently by the representatives of Native organizations or Native-owned businesses in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries to appropriate Indianness."--Publisher's website.
2013-01-22 By Maureen Trudelle Schwarz

First Published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Author: John R. Wunder

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 0815324855

Category: Political Science

Page: 334

View: 968

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First Published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
1996 By John R. Wunder

This volume examines three interrelated aspects of the history of British India: race, the disciplining institution, and attempts by the colonized to imagine states of freedom.

Author: Satadru Sen

Publisher: Primus Books

ISBN: 9789380607313

Category: History

Page: 359

View: 811

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This volume examines three interrelated aspects of the history of British India: race, the disciplining institution, and attempts by the colonized to imagine states of freedom. They deal with sites as diverse as the prison, the family, the classroom, the playing field and children's literature. The essays confront the ideological, social and political ramifications of the fact that even as metropolitan prisons and schools shifted their attention from the body to the confined 'soul', colonial disciplinary institutions ensured that race was firmly attached to the body and its habits. They also engage the historiography that has sought to underline the challenges of reconciling Michel Foucault and Edward Said. They ask whether the liberating possibilities of the racialized-and-embodied 'native' self were confined to inversions and rearrangements of given normative hierarchies, or if we can occasionally glimpse radical departures and alternative configurations of power.
2012 By Satadru Sen

The work juxtaposes official, popular, and critical perspectives of the movement to complicate prevailing ideas about colonialism, historiography, and indigenous culture and identity in the Pacific. The book is divided into three sections.

Author: Vicente M. Diaz

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824860462

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 303

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In the vein of an emergent Native Pacific brand of cultural studies, Repositioning the Missionary critically examines the cultural and political stakes of the historic and present-day movement to canonize Blessed Diego Luis de San Vitores (1627–1672), the Spanish Jesuit missionary who was martyred by Mata'pang of Guam while establishing the Catholic mission among the Chamorros in the Mariana Islands. The work juxtaposes official, popular, and critical perspectives of the movement to complicate prevailing ideas about colonialism, historiography, and indigenous culture and identity in the Pacific. The book is divided into three sections. The first, "From Above, Working the Native," focuses exclusively on the narratological reconsolidation of official Roman Catholic Church viewpoints as staked in the historic (seventeenth century) and contemporary (twentieth century) movements to canonize San Vitores, including the symbolic costs of these viewpoints for Native Chamorro cultural and political possibilities not in line with Church views. Section two, "From Below: Working the Saint," shifts attention and perspective to local, competing forms of Chamorro piety. In their effort to canonize San Vitores, Natives also rework the saint to negotiate new cultural and social canons for themselves and in ways that produce new meanings for their island. "From Behind: Transgressive Histories" shifts from official and lay Roman and Chamorro Catholic viewpoints to the author’s own critical project of rendering alternative portrayals of San Vitores and Mata'pang. Theoretically innovative and provocative, humorous, and inspired, Repositioning the Missionary melds poststructuralist, feminist, Native studies, and cultural studies analytic and political frameworks with an intensely personal voice to model a new critical interdisciplinary approach to the study of indigenous culture and history.
2010-07-13 By Vicente M. Diaz

This social history draws on official archives and documents based in Scotland, England and India. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in history, sociology, or the general interest reader.

Author: J. Mills

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 033379334X

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 102

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This fascinating, entertaining and often gruelling book by James Mills, examines the lunatic asylums set up by the British in nineteenth-century India. The author asserts that there was a growth in asylums following the Indian Mutiny, fuelled by the fear of itinerant and dangerous individuals, which existed primarily in the British imagination. Once established though, these asylums, which were staffed by Indians and populated by Indians, quickly became arenas in which the designs of the British were contested and confronted. Mills argues that power is everywhere and is behind every action; colonial power is therefore just another way to assert control over the less powerful. This social history draws on official archives and documents based in Scotland, England and India. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in history, sociology, or the general interest reader.
2000-07-11 By J. Mills

After two centuries of colonialism, th realities (and disparities) of Spanish-Maya cultural heterogeneity were ex emplified in indigenous Christian syncretism and in a European-styled po litical structure that operated in Maya ways.

Author: Susan Schroeder

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: UVA:X004190132

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 398

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Ethnic rebellions continually disrupted the Pax Colonial, Spain's three-hundred-year rule over the Native peoples of Mexico. Although these uprisings varied considerably in cause, duration, consequences, and scale, they collectively served as a constant source of worry for the Spanish authorities. This volume provides both an overview of Native uprisings in New Spain. Contributors examine episodes of rebellion that are distinguished by their ethnic, geographical, and historical diversity, ranging culturally and geographically across colonial New Spain and spanning the last two centuries of Spanish rule.
1998 By Susan Schroeder

Her rich social and cultural history tells the story of the making of colonialism at the edge of empire through the eyes of native intermediary figures: indigenous governors clothed in Spanish silks, priests’ assistants, interpreters, ...

Author: Yanna Yannakakis

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822388982

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 106

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In The Art of Being In-between Yanna Yannakakis rethinks processes of cultural change and indigenous resistance and accommodation to colonial rule through a focus on the Sierra Norte of Oaxaca, a rugged, mountainous, ethnically diverse, and overwhelmingly indigenous region of colonial Mexico. Her rich social and cultural history tells the story of the making of colonialism at the edge of empire through the eyes of native intermediary figures: indigenous governors clothed in Spanish silks, priests’ assistants, interpreters, economic middlemen, legal agents, landed nobility, and “Indian conquistadors.” Through political negotiation, cultural brokerage, and the exercise of violence, these fascinating intercultural figures redefined native leadership, sparked indigenous rebellions, and helped forge an ambivalent political culture that distinguished the hinterlands from the centers of Spanish empire. Through interpretation of a wide array of historical sources—including descriptions of public rituals, accounts of indigenous rebellions, idolatry trials, legal petitions, court cases, land disputes, and indigenous pictorial histories—Yannakakis weaves together an elegant narrative that illuminates political and cultural struggles over the terms of local rule. As cultural brokers, native intermediaries at times reconciled conflicting interests, and at other times positioned themselves in opposing camps over the outcome of municipal elections, the provision of goods and labor, landholding, community ritual, the meaning of indigenous “custom” in relation to Spanish law, and representations of the past. In the process, they shaped an emergent “Indian” identity in tension with other forms of indigenous identity and a political order characterized by a persistent conflict between local autonomy and colonial control. This innovative study provides fresh insight into colonialism’s disparate cultures and the making of race, ethnicity, and the colonial state and legal system in Spanish America.
2008-06-04 By Yanna Yannakakis

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