Search Results for kabbalah-magic-and-science

The marriage between kabbalah and science was soon to break asunder as a result of historical forces unforeseeable by Yagel . By the end of his life the Lurianic kabbalah had helped to inject a new spiritual mood of prayer , ritual ...

Author: David B. Ruderman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674496604

Category: History

Page: 232

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In describing the career of Abraham Yagel, a Jewish physician, kabbalist, and naturalist who lived in northern Italy from 1553 to about 1623, David Ruderman observes the remarkable interplay between early modern scientific thought and religious and occult traditions from a wholly new perspective: that of Jewish intellectual life. Whether he was writing about astronomical discoveries, demons, marvelous creatures and prodigies of nature, the uses of magic, or reincarnation, Yagel made a consistent effort to integrate empirical study of nature with kabbalistic and rabbinic learning. Yagel's several interests were united in his belief in the interconnectedness of all thing--a belief, shared by many Renaissance thinkers, that turns natural phenomena into "signatures" of the divine unity of all things. Ruderman argues that Yagel and his coreligionists were predisposed to this prevalent view because of occult strains in traditional Jewish thought He also suggests that underlying Yagel's passion for integrating and correlating all knowledge was a powerful psychological need to gain cultural respect and acceptance for himself and for his entire community, especially in a period of increased anti-Semitic agitation in Italy. Yagel proposed a bold new agenda for Jewish culture that underscored the religious value of the study of nature, reformulated kabbalist traditions in the language of scientific discourse so as to promote them as the highest form of human knowledge, and advocated the legitimate role of the magical arts as the ultimate expression of human creativity in Judaism. This portrait of Yagel and his intellectual world will well serve all students of late Renaissance and early modern Europe.

Ruderman, Kabbalah, Magic, and Science, 140–41. 67. Pico della Mirandola evokes the idea of “poetic theology,” according to which ancient pagan authors concealed the esoteric meaning of their compositions by way of hiding the truth ...

Author: Andrea Gondos

Publisher: State University of New York Press

ISBN: 9781438479736

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 125

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Demonstrates the impact of print culture on the spread of Jewish mysticism, focusing on Kabbalistic study guides by R. Yissakhar Baer of seventeenth-century Prague. How did Jewish mysticism go from arcane knowledge to popular spirituality? Kabbalah in Print examines the cultural impact of printing on the popularization, circulation, and transmission of Kabbalah in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The Zohar, in particular, generated a large secondary literature of study guides and reference works that aimed to ease the linguistic and conceptual challenges of the text. The arrival of printed classics of Kabbalah was soon followed by the appearance of new literary genres—anthologies, digests, lexicons, and other learning aids—that mediated mystical primary sources to a community of readers not versed in this lore. A detailed investigation of the four works by R. Yissakhar Baer (ca.1580–ca.1629) of Prague sheds light on the literary strategies, pedagogic concerns, and religious motivations of secondary elites, a new cadre of authors empowered by the opportunities that printing opened up. Andrea Gondos highlights shifting intellectual and cultural boundaries in the early modern period, when the transmission of Kabbalah became a meeting point connecting various strata of Jewish society as well as Jewish and Christian intellectuals. Andrea Gondos is Emmy Noether Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute of Jewish Studies at Free University Berlin, Germany. She is the coeditor (with Daniel Maoz) of From Antiquity to the Postmodern World: Contemporary Jewish Studies in Canada.
2020-11-01 By Andrea Gondos

The view of the physical world as a symbolic text makes kabbalah closer to modern information science than to the natural ... The magical interpretation of kabbalah not only made kabbalists interested in the study of magic, alchemy, ...

Author: Gad Freudenthal

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107001459

Category: History

Page: 547

View: 524

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Provides the first comprehensive overview by world-renowned experts of what we know today of medieval Jews' engagement with the sciences.
2011 By Gad Freudenthal

Every culture makes the distinction between "true religion" and magic, regarding one action and its result as "miraculous," while rejecting another as the work of the devil.

Author: Jacob Neusner

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195079111

Category: Drama

Page: 307

View: 210

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Every culture makes the distinction between "true religion" and magic, regarding one action and its result as "miraculous," while rejecting another as the work of the devil. Surveying such topics as Babylonian witchcraft, Jesus the magician, magic in Hasidism and Kabbalah, and magic in Anglo-Saxon England, these ten essays provide a rigorous examination of the history of this distinction in Christianity and Judaism. Written by such distinguished scholars as Jacob Neusner, Hans Penner, Howard Kee, Tzvi Abusch, Susan R. Garrett, and Moshe Idel, the essays explore a broad range of topics, including how certain social groups sort out approved practices and beliefs from those that are disapproved--providing fresh insight into how groups define themselves; "magic" as an insider's term for the outsider's religion; and the tendency of religious traditions to exclude the magical. In addition the collection provides illuminating social, cultural, and anthropological explanations for the prominence of the magical in certain periods and literatures.
1992 By Jacob Neusner

Whereas Italian Kabbalistic magic was presented in the context of a philosophic reworking of the Kabbalah by presenting it as congenial to the Neoplatonic,21 Aristotelian,22 and later on even atomistic philosophy,23 Spanish Kabbalists ...

Author: Jacob Neusner Professor of Religion University of South Florida

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199729333

Category: Magic

Page: 312

View: 939

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Every culture makes the distinction between "true religion" and magic, regarding one action and its result as "miraculous," while rejecting another as the work of the devil. Surveying such topics as Babylonian witchcraft, Jesus the magician, magic in Hasidism and Kabbalah, and magic in Anglo-Saxon England, these ten essays provide a rigrous examination of the history of this distinction in Christianity and Judaism. Written by such distinguished scholars as Jacob Neusner, Hans Penner, Howard Kee, Tzvi Abusch, Susan R. Garrett, and Moshe Idel, the essays explore a broad range of topics, including how certain social groups sort out approved practices and beliefs from those that are disapproved--providing fresh insight into how groups define themselves; "magic" as an insider's term for the outsider's religion; and the tendency of religious traditions to exclude the magical. In addition the collection provides illuminating social, cultural, and anthropological explanations for the prominence of the magical in certain periods and literature.

period when science relied on all kinds of sources and methodologies , including occult and prophetic ones . ... by showing the way kabbalistic thinkers integrated Neoplatonism , magic , and science into their study of Kabbalah .

Author: Allison Coudert

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004098445

Category: History

Page: 462

View: 504

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If he had lived among the Greeks, he would now be numbered among the stars. So wrote Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz in his epitaph for Francis Mercury van Helmont. With his friend Christian Knorr von Rosenroth, van Helmont edited the Kabbala Denudata (1677-1684), the largest collection of Lurianic Kabbalistic texts available to Christians up to that time. Because the subject matter of this work appears so difficult and arcane, it has never been appreciated as a significant text for understanding the emergence of modern thought. However, one can find in it the basis for the faith in science, the belief in progress, and the pluralism characteristic of later western thought. The Lurianic Kabbalah thus deserves a place it has never received in histories of western scientific and cultural developments.
1999 By Allison Coudert

129 Derekh ʻEtz Hayyim, introduction, 8 (and compare to 10 and the discussion in Garb, Modern Kabbalah, 14–21). ... 134 Beit Ya'ar ha-Levanon, translated and discussed in Ruderman, Kabbalah, Magic and Science, 110–111, 117, 144–149.

Author: Jonathan Garb

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108882972

Category: Religion

Page:

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This volume offers a narrative history of modern Kabbalah, from the sixteenth century to the present. Covering all sub-periods, schools, and figures, Jonathan Garb demonstrates how Kabbalah expanded over the last few centuries, and how it became an important player, first in the European, subsequently in global cultural and intellectual domains. Indeed, study of the Kabbalah can be found on virtually every continent and in many languages, despite of the destruction of many centres in the mid-twentieth century. Garb explores the sociological, psychological, scholastic and ritual dimensions of kabbalistic ways of life in their geographical and cultural contexts. Focusing on several important mystical and literary figures, he shows how modern Kabbalah is both deeply embedded in modern Jewish life, yet has become an independent, professionalized sub-world. He also traces how Kabbalah was influenced by, and contributed to the process of modernization.
2020-06-30 By Jonathan Garb

positive step for the kabbalah to seek external substantiation from other sources : “ I have known that they , the kabbalah ... siThis is more fully discussed below and in Ruderman , Kabbalah , Magic , and Science , especially chap .

Author:

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9781512806731

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 150

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A Valley of Vision is unique in Hebrew literature in its integration of traditional Jewish materials with contemporary literary and iconographic innovations. It is also a fascinating window into the social and cultural world of Italian Jewry at the end of the sixteenth century and its effect on the entire late Renaissance period.
2016-11-11 By

Kabbalistic magic already existed in the Judaic tradition when it attracted the interest of Christian scholars, and it did not take long for the Christianized cabalistic tradition to incorporate magical practices as well.

Author: Mark A. Waddell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108425285

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 692

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An accessible new exploration of the vibrant world of early modern Europe through a focus on magic, science, and religion.
2021-01-28 By Mark A. Waddell

For magic in Renaissance Jewish thought see Erwin Rosenthal, “Yohanan Alemanno and Occult Science," Prismata, ... “The Magical and Neoplatonic Interpretations of Kabbalah in the Renaissance,” in jewish Thought in the Sixteenth Century, ...

Author: Joshua Trachtenberg

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812208337

Category: Religion

Page: 392

View: 378

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Alongside the formal development of Judaism from the eleventh through the sixteenth centuries, a robust Jewish folk religion flourished—ideas and practices that never met with wholehearted approval by religious leaders yet enjoyed such wide popularity that they could not be altogether excluded from the religion. According to Joshua Trachtenberg, it is not possible truly to understand the experience and history of the Jewish people without attempting to recover their folklife and beliefs from centuries past. Jewish Magic and Superstition is a masterful and utterly fascinating exploration of religious forms that have all but disappeared yet persist in the imagination. The volume begins with legends of Jewish sorcery and proceeds to discuss beliefs about the evil eye, spirits of the dead, powers of good, the famous legend of the golem, procedures for casting spells, the use of gems and amulets, how to battle spirits, the ritual of circumcision, herbal folk remedies, fortune telling, astrology, and the interpretation of dreams. First published more than sixty years ago, Trachtenberg's study remains the foundational scholarship on magical practices in the Jewish world and offers an understanding of folk beliefs that expressed most eloquently the everyday religion of the Jewish people.
2012-10-08 By Joshua Trachtenberg