Search Results for in-search-of-sisterhood

This history of the largest block women's organization in the United States is not only the story of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority (DST), but also tells of the increasing involvement of black women in the political, social, and economic ...

Author: Paula J. Giddings

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780688135096

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 272

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This history of the largest block women's organization in the United States is not only the story of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority (DST), but also tells of the increasing involvement of black women in the political, social, and economic affairs of America. Founded at a time when liberal arts education was widely seen as either futile, dangerous, or impractical for blacks, especially women, DST is, in Giddings's words, a "compelling reflection of block women's aspirations for themselves and for society." Giddings notes that unlike other organizations with racial goals, Delta Sigma Theta was created to change and benefit individuals rather than society. As a sorority, it was formed to bring women together as sisters, but at the some time to address the divisive, often class-related issues confronting black women in our society. There is, in Giddings's eyes, a tension between these goals that makes Delta Sigma Theta a fascinating microcosm of the struggles of black women and their organizations. DST members have included Mary McLeod Bethune, Mary Church Terrell, Margaret Murray Washington, Shirley Chisholm, Barbara Jordan, and, on the cultural side, Leontyne Price, Lena Horne, Ruby Dee, Judith Jamison, and Roberta Flack. In Search of Sisterhood is full of compelling, fascinating anecdotes told by the Deltas themselves, and illustrated with rare early photographs of the Delta women.
2007-02-27 By Paula J. Giddings

delta sigma theta sorority paraphernalia journal - DST Journal for writing, note-taking, brainstorming and more. it's perfect for a diary or writes your thoughts or anything you want. also, it's a perfect gift.

Author: Tod I. Adams

Publisher:

ISBN: 9798698660330

Category:

Page: 110

View: 794

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delta sigma theta sorority paraphernalia journal - DST Journal for writing, note-taking, brainstorming and more. it's perfect for a diary or writes your thoughts or anything you want. also, it's a perfect gift. Product Details: Blank lined pages Over 109 Pages Soft Paperback Cover Glossy cover finish Made In USA
2020-10-16 By Tod I. Adams

Giddings, In Search of Sisterhood, 33, 37, 39. 27. Ibid., 41. 28. Ibid., 69. 29. Ibid., 34. 30. Ibid., 66. 31. Ibid., 35, 208. 32. Ibid., 261. 33.

Author: Gregory S. Parks

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813172958

Category: Education

Page: 508

View: 816

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During the twentieth century, black Greek-Letter organizations (BGLOs) united college students dedicated to excellence, fostered kinship, and uplifted African Americans. Members of these organizations include remarkable and influential individuals such as Martin Luther King Jr., Congresswoman Barbara Jordan, novelist Toni Morrison, and Wall Street pioneer Reginald F. Lewis. Despite the profound influence of these groups, many now question the continuing relevance of BGLOs, arguing that their golden age has passed. Partly because of their perceived link to hip-hop culture, black fraternities and sororities have been unfairly reduced to a media stereotype -- a world of hazing without any real substance. The general public knows very little about BGLOs, and surprisingly the members themselves often do not have a thorough understanding of their history and culture or of the issues currently facing their organizations. To foster a greater engagement with the history and contributions of BGLOs, Black Greek-Letter Organizations in the Twenty-first Century: Our Fight Has Just Begun brings together an impressive group of authors to explore the contributions and continuing possibilities of BGLOs and their members. Editor Gregory S. Parks and the contributing authors provide historical context for the development of BGLOs, exploring their service activities as well as their relationships with other prominent African American institutions. The book examines BGLOs' responses to a number of contemporary issues, including non-black membership, homosexuality within BGLOs, and the perception of BGLOs as educated gangs. As illustrated by the organized response of BGLO members to the racial injustice they observed in Jena, Louisiana, these organizations still have a vital mission. Both internally and externally, BGLOs struggle to forge a relevant identity for the new century. Internally, these groups wrestle with many issues, including hazing, homophobia, petty intergroup competition, and the difficulty of bridging the divide between college and alumni members. Externally, BGLOs face the challenge of rededicating themselves to their communities and leading an aggressive campaign against modern forms of racism, sexism, and other types of fear-driven behavior. By embracing the history of these organizations and exploring their continuing viability and relevance, Black Greek-Letter Organizations in the Twenty-first Century demonstrates that BGLOs can create a positive and enduring future and that their most important work lies ahead.
2008-06-13 By Gregory S. Parks

146 Paula J. Giddings, In Search of Sisterhood: Delta Sigma Theta and the Challenge of the Black Sorority Movement (New York: William Morrow, 1988), 48; ...

Author: Gregory S. Parks

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479859634

Category: History

Page:

View: 700

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Reveals the historical and political significance of “The Divine Nine”—the Black Greek Letter Organizations In 1905, Henry Arthur Callis began his studies at Cornell University. Despite their academic pedigrees, Callis and his fellow African American students were ostracized by the majority-white student body, and so in 1906, Callis and some of his peers started the first, intercollegiate Black Greek Letter Organization (BGLO), Alpha Phi Alpha. Since their founding, BGLOs have not only served to solidify bonds among many African American college students, they have also imbued them with a sense of purpose and a commitment to racial uplift—the endeavor to help Black Americans reach socio-economic equality. A Pledge with Purpose explores the arc of these unique, important, and relevant social institutions. Gregory S. Parks and Matthew W. Hughey uncover how BGLOs were shaped by, and labored to transform, the changing social, political, and cultural landscape of Black America from the era of the Harlem Renaissance to the civil rights movement. Alpha Phi Alpha boasts such members as Thurgood Marshall, civil rights lawyer and US Supreme Court Justice, and Dr. Charles Wesley, noted historian and college president. Delta Sigma Theta members include Bethune-Cookman College founder Mary McLeod Bethune and women’s rights activist Dorothy Height. Huey P. Newton, co-founder of the Black Panther Party, who left an indelible mark on the civil rights movement, was a member of Phi Beta Sigma, while Dr. Mae Jemison, a celebrated engineer and astronaut, belonged to Alpha Kappa Alpha. Through such individuals, Parks and Hughey demonstrate the ways that BGLO members have long been at the forefront of innovation, activism, and scholarship. In its examination of the history of these important organizations, A Pledge with Purpose serves as a critical reflection of both the collective African American racial struggle and the various strategies of Black Americans in their great—and unfinished—march toward freedom and equality.
2020-04-14 By Gregory S. Parks

Giddings, In Search of Sisterhood, 65, 66. 57. Ibid., 35, 39. 58. Delta, January–February 1979, 5. 59. Giddings, In Search of Sisterhood, 38. 60.

Author: Gregory S. Parks

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813138725

Category: Social Science

Page: 524

View: 790

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“A masterpiece of multidisciplinary scholarship that clearly demonstrates the contemporary relevance of black fraternities and sororities.” —Hasan Kwame Jeffries, author of Bloody Lowndes During the twentieth century, black Greek-Letter organizations (BGLOs) united college students dedicated to excellence, fostered kinship, and uplifted African Americans. Members of these organizations include remarkable and influential individuals such as Martin Luther King Jr., Congresswoman Barbara Jordan, novelist Toni Morrison, and Wall Street pioneer Reginald F. Lewis. Despite the profound influence of these groups, many now question the continuing relevance of BGLOs, arguing that their golden age has passed. To foster a greater engagement with the history and contributions of BGLOs, Black Greek-Letter Organizations in the Twenty-first Century brings together an impressive group of authors to explore the contributions and continuing possibilities of BGLOs and their members. Editor Gregory S. Parks and the contributing authors provide historical context for the development of BGLOs, exploring their service activities as well as their relationships with other prominent African American institutions. Both internally and externally, BGLOs struggle to forge a relevant identity for the new century. Internally, these groups wrestle with many issues, including hazing, homophobia, petty intergroup competition, and the difficulty of bridging the divide between college and alumni members. Externally, BGLOs face the challenge of rededicating themselves to their communities and leading an aggressive campaign against modern forms of racism, sexism, and other types of fear-driven behavior. By embracing the history of these organizations and exploring their continuing viability and relevance, Black Greek-Letter Organizations in the Twenty-first Century demonstrates that BGLOs can create a positive and enduring future and that their most important work lies ahead.
2008-06-13 By Gregory S. Parks

Paula Giddings, In Search of Sisterhood: Delta Sigma Theta and the Challenge of the Black Sorority Movement (New York: William Morrow, 1988), 50. 33.

Author: Tamara L. Brown

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813140735

Category: History

Page: 692

View: 576

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The rich history and social significance of the “Divine Nine” African American Greek-letter organizations is explored in this comprehensive anthology. In the long tradition of African American benevolent and secret societies, intercollegiate African American fraternities and sororities have strong traditions of fostering brotherhood and sisterhood among their members, exerting considerable influence in the African American community and being in the forefront of civic action, community service, and philanthropy. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Toni Morrison, Arthur Ashe, and Sarah Vaughn are just a few of the trailblazing members of these organizations. African American Fraternities and Sororities places the history of these organizations in context, linking them to other movements and organizations that predated them and tying their history to the Civil Rights movement. It explores various cultural aspects of the organizations, such as auxiliary groups, branding, calls, and stepping, and highlights the unique role of African American sororities.
2012-02-29 By Tamara L. Brown

See Paula Giddings, In Search of Sisterhood: Delta Sigma Theta and the Challenge of the Black Sorority Movement (New York, 1988), 144–145; Carter G. Woodson ...

Author: David J. Libby

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1604730625

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 854

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In 1968, Winthrop D. Jordan published his groundbreaking work White Over Black: American Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812 and opened up new avenues for thinking about sex, slavery, race, and religion in American culture. Over the course of a forty-year career at the University of California and the University of Mississippi, he continued to write about these issues and to train others to think in new ways about interactions of race, gender, faith, and power. Written by former students of Jordan, these essays are a tribute to the career of one of America's great thinkers and perhaps the most influential American historian of his generation. The book visits historical locales from Puritan New England and French Louisiana to nineteenth-century New York and Mississippi, all the way to Harlem swing clubs and college campuses in the twentieth century. In the process, authors listen to the voices of abolitionists and white supremacists, preachers and politicos, white farm women and black sorority sisters, slaves, and jazz musicians. Each essay represents an important contribution to the collection's larger themes and at the same time illustrates the impact Jordan exerted on the scholarly life of each author. Collectively, these pieces demonstrate the attentiveness to detail and sensitivity to sources that are hallmarks of Jordan's own work.
2009-09-18 By David J. Libby

From Ida B. Wells to the first black Presidential candidate, Shirley Chisholm; from the anti-lynching movement to the struggle for suffrage and equal protection under the law; Giddings tells the stories of black women who transcended the ...

Author: Paula J. Giddings

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780061984921

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 643

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When and Where I Enter is an eloquent testimonial to the profound influence of African-American women on race and women's movements throughout American history. Drawing on speeches, diaries, letters, and other original documents, Paula Giddings powerfully portrays how black women have transcended racist and sexist attitudes--often confronting white feminists and black male leaders alike--to initiate social and political reform. From the open disregard for the rights of slave women to examples of today's more covert racism and sexism in civil rights and women'sorganizations, Giddings illuminates the black woman's crusade for equality. In the process, she paints unforgettable portraits of black female leaders, such as anti-lynching activist Ida B. Wells, educator and FDR adviser Mary McLeod Bethune, and the heroic civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, among others, who fought both overt and institutionalized oppression. When and Where I Enter reveals the immense moral power black women possessed and sought to wield throughout their history--the same power that prompted Anna Julia Cooper in 1892 to tell a group of black clergymen, "Only the black woman can say 'when and where I enter, in the quiet, undisputed dignity of my womanhood, without violence and without suing or special patronage, then and there the whole . . . race enters with me.'"
2009-10-06 By Paula J. Giddings

In Search of Sisterhood : Delta Sigma Theta and the Challenge of the Black Sorority Movement . New York : Morrow , 1988 . Goodwin , Rudy Berkely .

Author: Jessie Carney Smith

Publisher: VNR AG

ISBN: 0810391775

Category: Reference

Page: 775

View: 134

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Provides brief biographies of business executives, writers, journalists, lawyers, physicians, actresses, singers, musicians, artists, educators, religious leaders, civil rights activists, politicians, aviators, athletes, and scientists

44. Historian Paula Giddings writes that African American sororities had very strict academic guidelines for membership. See In Search for Sisterhood, 20.

Author: Craig LaRon Torbenson

Publisher: Associated University Presse

ISBN: 0838641946

Category: Education

Page: 320

View: 468

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The 1950s are arguably the watershed era in the civil rights movement with the landmark Supreme Court decision of Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1955, and the desegregation of Little Rock (Arkansas) High School in 1957. It was during this period--1955 to be exact--that sociologist Alfred M. Lee published his seminal work Fraternities without Brotherhood: A Study of Prejudice on the American Campus. Lee's book was the first and last book to explore diversity within college fraternal groups. More than fifty years later, Craig L. Torbenson and Gregory S. Parks revisit this issue more broadly in their edited volume Brothers and Sisters: Diversity in College Fraternities and Sororities. This volume draws from a variety of disciplines in an attempt to provide a holistic analysis of diversity within collegiate fraternal life. It also brings a wide range of scholarly approaches to the inquiry of diversity within college fraternities and sororities. It explores not only from whence these groups have come but where they are currently situated and what issues arise as they progress.

(1983b, rpt 1984) In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens: Womanist Prose, ... Wallace, Michele (1975, rpt 1982) 'A Black Feminist's Search for Sisterhood', ...

Author: Maria Lauret

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415065153

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 241

View: 502

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Liberating Literature is, primarily, a bold and revealing book about feminist writers, readers, and texts. But is is also much more than that. Within this volume Maria Lauret manages to look with fresh vision at the American Civil Rights movement of the 1960s; socialist women's writing of the 1930s; the emergence of the New Left; and the second wave women's movement and its cultural practices. Lauret's historicisation of feminist political writing allows for a new definition of the genre, and enables her to illuminate the profound influence and importance of African-American women's writing. Well-grounded historically and theoretically, Liberating Literature speaks about and to a political and cultural tradition, and offers stunning new readings of both familiar and neglected novels within the feminist canon. Reader and students of feminist fiction cannot afford to be without this major new work.
1994 By Maria Lauret

Giddings, In Search of Sisterhood, 49. 24. Jürgen Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere: An Inquiry into a Category of Bourgeois ...

Author: Deborah Elizabeth Whaley

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438432748

Category: Social Science

Page: 218

View: 802

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An interdisciplinary look Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA), the first historically Black sorority.
2010-09-01 By Deborah Elizabeth Whaley

point for my search for sisterhood in policing began with an attempt to trace senior policewomen's 'gender consciousness' through an examination of their ...

Author: Marisa Silvestri

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134001262

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 110

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This book is concerned with the gendered world of police leadership at a time when calls are being made for a different kind of police leader to guide the organisation through the twenty-first century. Drawing on in-depth interviews carried out with senior policewomen across a range of police forces in England and Wales, Women in Charge is the first book to provide a detailed study of women in police leadership. The work challenges existing conceptualisations and theorisations of police culture for the study of police leaders, demonstrating the various ways in which police cultures are shaped by both rank and gender. Women in police leadership face a different kind of gendered environment than their non-managerial counterparts, one in which a 'smart macho' culture of police management dominates. At the same time this book investigates the extent to which senior policewomen are involved in developing new styles and conceptualisations of leadership. It argues that women are involved in promoting a different kind of police leadership, using more consultative and holistic styles - styles not traditionally associated with the police organisation.
2013-05-13 By Marisa Silvestri

“ A Letter to the Editor of Ms . ” In In Search of Our Mothers ' Gardens . ... “ Anger in Isolation : A Black Feminist ' s Search for Sisterhood .

Author: Professor of Sociology Michele Lamont

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226468356

Category: Social Science

Page: 413

View: 682

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Even as America becomes more multiracial, the black-white divide remains central to understanding many patterns and tensions in contemporary society. Since the 1960s, however, social scientists concerned with this topic have been reluctant to discuss the cultural dimensions of racial inequality—not wanting to "blame the victim" for having "wrong values." The Cultural Territories of Race redirects this research tendency, employing today's more sophisticated methods of cultural analysis toward a new understanding of how cultural structures articulate the black/white problem. These essays examine the cultural territories of race through topics such as blacks' strategies for dealing with racism, public categories for definition of race, and definitions of rules for cultural memberships. Empirically grounded, these studies analyze divisions among blacks according to their relationships with whites or with alternative black culture; differences among whites regarding their attitudes toward blacks; and differences both among blacks and between blacks and whites, in their cultural understandings of various aspects of social life ranging from material success to marital life and to ideas about feminism. The essays teach us about the largely underexamined cultural universes of black executives, upwardly mobile college students, fast-food industry workers, so-called deadbeat dads, and proponents of Afrocentric curricula. The Cultural Territories of Race makes an important contribution to current policy debates by amplifying muted voices that have too often been ignored by other social scientists. Contributors are: Elijah Anderson, Amy Binder, Bethany Bryson, Michael C. Dawson, Catherine Ellis, Herbert J. Gans, Jennifer L. Hochschild, Michèle Lamont, Jane J. Mansbridge, Katherine S. Newman, Maureen R. Waller, Pamela Barnhouse Walters, Mary C. Waters, Julia Wrigley, Alford A. Young Jr.

In this eagerly awaited biography by Paula J. Giddings, author of the groundbreaking book When and Where I Enter, which traced the activisthistory of black women in America, the irrepressible personality of Ida B. Wells surges out of the ...

Author: Paula J. Giddings

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061972940

Category: Social Science

Page: 832

View: 505

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In the tradition of towering biographies that tell us as much about America as they do about their subject, Ida: A Sword Among Lions is a sweepingnarrative about a country and a crusader embroiled in the struggle against lynching: a practice that imperiled not only the lives of blackmen and women, but also a nation based on law and riven by race. At the center of the national drama is Ida B. Wells (1862-1931), born to slaves in Mississippi, who began her activist career by refusing to leave a first-class ladies’ car on a Memphis railway and rose to lead the nation’s firstcampaign against lynching. For Wells the key to the rise in violence was embedded in attitudes not only about black men but about women and sexuality as well. Her independent perspective and percussive personality gained her encomiums as a hero -- as well as aspersions on her character and threats of death. Exiled from the South by 1892, Wells subsequently took her campaign across the country and throughout the British Isles before she married and settled in Chicago, where she continued her activism as a journalist, suffragist, and independent candidate in the rough-and-tumble world of the Windy City’s politics. In this eagerly awaited biography by Paula J. Giddings, author of the groundbreaking book When and Where I Enter, which traced the activisthistory of black women in America, the irrepressible personality of Ida B. Wells surges out of the pages. With meticulous research and vivid rendering of her subject, Giddings also provides compelling portraits of twentieth-century progressive luminaries, black and white, with whom Wells worked during some of the most tumultuous periods in American history. Embattled all of her activist life, Wells found herself fighting not only conservative adversaries but icons of the civil rights and women’s suffrage movements who sought to undermine her place in history. In this definitive biography, which places Ida B. Wells firmly in the context of her times as well as ours, Giddings at long last gives this visionary reformer her due and, in the process, sheds light on an aspect of our history that isoften left in the shadows.
2009-10-06 By Paula J. Giddings

Giddings, In Search of Sisterhood, 145. 80. Keith Janken, Mary Ritter Beard (1876–1958) / Marion Thompson Wright (1905–1962) 121.

Author: Crocco

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9780742571389

Category: Education

Page: 304

View: 304

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This lively and thought-provoking collective biography uncovers the contributions of past women educators who promoted a distinctive vision of citizenship education. A distinguished group of scholars, including editors Margaret Smith Crocco and O. L. Davis, Jr., consider the lives and perspectives of eleven women educators and social activists—Jane Addams, Mary Sheldon Barnes, Mary Ritter Beard, Rachel Davis DuBois, Hazel Hertzberg, Alice Miel, Lucy Sprague Mitchell, Bessie Pierce, Lucy Maynard Salmon, Hilda Taba, and Marion Thompson Wright—concerned over the last century with issues of difference in schools and society. This volume's reconstruction of "hidden history" reveals the importance of these women to contemporary debate about gender, pluralism, and education in a democracy. Characterized by views of education that were constructivist, customized, and transformative, their lives and ideas present an alternative model to dominant conceptualizations of education—one sensitive to the demands of pluralism within civil education long before the present-day debates about multiculturalism.
1999-10-20 By Crocco

Giddings, In Search of Sisterhood, 69, 109; White, Too Heavy a Load, 149, 152, 155; Clarenda M. Phillips, “Sisterly Bonds: African American Sororities ...

Author: D'Weston Haywood

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469643403

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 315

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During its golden years, the twentieth-century black press was a tool of black men's leadership, public voice, and gender and identity formation. Those at the helm of black newspapers used their platforms to wage a fight for racial justice and black manhood. In a story that stretches from the turn of the twentieth century to the rise of the Black Power movement, D'Weston Haywood argues that black people's ideas, rhetoric, and protest strategies for racial advancement grew out of the quest for manhood led by black newspapers. This history departs from standard narratives of black protest, black men, and the black press by positioning newspapers at the intersections of gender, ideology, race, class, identity, urbanization, the public sphere, and black institutional life. Shedding crucial new light on the deep roots of African Americans' mobilizations around issues of rights and racial justice during the twentieth century, Let Us Make Men reveals the critical, complex role black male publishers played in grounding those issues in a quest to redeem black manhood.
2018-09-25 By D'Weston Haywood

Paula Giddings, In Search of Sisterhood: Delta Sigma Theta and the Challenge of the Black Sorority Movement (New York, 1988). Darlene Rebecca Roth found ...

Author: Darlene Clark Hine

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780926019812

Category: History

Page: 618

View: 154

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Contains essays which share the experiences and emphasize the achievements and struggles of Black women from colonial times through the 20th century
1995-04-01 By Darlene Clark Hine

... “Anger in Isolation: A Black Feminist's Search for Sisterhood,” in Wallace, Invisibility Blues: From Pop to Theory (London, Verso, 1990), 18–25, esp.

Author: Winifred Breines

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195334593

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 120

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Focusing on white and black women, this book examines the feminist movement to ask why, given the roots of second wave feminism in the civil rights movement, a racially integrated women's liberation movement didn't develop in the 1960s and 70s in the United States.

"Anger in Isolation: A Black Feminist Search For Sisterhood." Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. Ed. Beverly Guy-Sheftall.

Author: Carmen Rose Marshall

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786481224

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 227

View: 952

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The last three decades of the 20th century have marked the triumph of many black professional women against great odds in the workplace. Despite their success, few novels celebrate their accomplishments. Black middle-class professional women want to see themselves realistically portrayed by protagonists who work to achieve significant productivity and visibility in their careers, desire stability in their personal lives, aspire to accrue wealth, and live elegantly though not consumptively. The author contends that most recent American realistic fiction fails to represent black professional women protagonists performing their work effectively in the workplace. Identifying the extent to which contemporary novels satisfy the "readerly desires" of black middle-class women readers, this book investigates why the readership wants the texts, as well as what they prefer in the books they buy. It also examines the technical and cultural factors that contribute to the lack of books with self-empowered black professional female protagonists, and considers The Salt Eaters by Toni Cade Bambara and Waiting to Exhale by Terry McMillan, two novels that function as significant markers in the development of contemporary black women writers' texts.
2015-01-24 By Carmen Rose Marshall

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