Search Results for globalisation-and-the-roman-world

This book applies modern theories of globalisation to the ancient Roman world, creating new understandings of Roman archaeology and history.

Author: Martin Pitts

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107043749

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 723

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This book applies modern theories of globalisation to the ancient Roman world, creating new understandings of Roman archaeology and history. This is the first book to intensely scrutinize the subject through a team of international specialists studying a wide range of topics, including imperialism, economics, migration, urbanism and art.
2014-10-06 By Martin Pitts

This book explores a new perspective for understanding the Roman world, using connectivity as a major point of departure.

Author: Martin Pitts

Publisher:

ISBN: 1316073203

Category: Globalization

Page: 308

View: 646

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2015 By Martin Pitts

This book explores new perspectives to understand this Roman ‘object boom’ and its impact on Roman history.

Author: Astrid Van Oyen

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781785706776

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 195

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The Roman period witnessed massive changes in the human-material environment, from monumentalised cityscapes to standardised low-value artefacts like pottery. This book explores new perspectives to understand this Roman ‘object boom’ and its impact on Roman history. In particular, the book’s international contributors question the traditional dominance of ‘representation’ in Roman archaeology, whereby objects have come to stand for social phenomena such as status, facets of group identity, or notions like Romanisation and economic growth. Drawing upon the recent material turn in anthropology and related disciplines, the essays in this volume examine what it means to materialise Roman history, focusing on the question of what objects do in history, rather than what they represent. In challenging the dominance of representation, and exploring themes such as the impact of standardisation and the role of material agency, Materialising Roman History is essential reading for anyone studying material culture from the Roman world (and beyond).
2017-09-30 By Astrid Van Oyen

Author: Ricardo Eichmann

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:226978665

Category: Architecture, Ancient

Page: 545

View: 886

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This volume redresses that imbalance, interpreting Nemrud Dağ as an attempt at canon building by Antiochos I in order to construct a dynastic ideology and social order, and proving the monument's importance for our understanding of a ...

Author: Miguel John Versluys

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108210881

Category: History

Page:

View: 209

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Located in the small kingdom of Commagene at the upper Euphrates, the late Hellenistic monument of Nemrud Dağ (c.50 BC) has been undeservedly neglected by scholars. Qualified as a Greco-Persian hybrid instigated by a lunatic king, this fascinating project of bricolage has been written out of history. This volume redresses that imbalance, interpreting Nemrud Dağ as an attempt at canon building by Antiochos I in order to construct a dynastic ideology and social order, and proving the monument's importance for our understanding of a crucial transitional phase from Hellenistic to Roman. Hellenistic Commagene therefore holds a profound significance for a number of discussions, such as the functioning of the Hellenistic koine and the genesis of Roman 'art', Hellenism and Persianism in antiquity, dynastic propaganda and the power of images, Romanisation in the East, the contextualising of the Augustan cultural revolution, and the role of Greek culture in the Roman world.
2017-06-29 By Miguel John Versluys

This book explores the subject of islands, their essence and identity, their isolation and their relationships in the Ancient world.

Author: Javier Velaza

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443892605

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 426

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This book explores the subject of islands, their essence and identity, their isolation and their relationships in the Ancient world. It investigates Greek and Roman concepts of insularity, and their practical consequences for the political, economic and social life of the Empire. The contributions examine whether being related to an island was an externally or internally distinctive feature, and whether a tension between insularity and globalisation can be detected in this period. The book also looks at whether there is an insular material culture, an island-based approach to sacredness, or an island-based category of epigraphy.
2017-05-11 By Javier Velaza

Author: Stefan Alkier

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105112591016

Category: Bible

Page: 535

View: 702

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2003 By Stefan Alkier

To answer these questions, this book sheds new light on the make-up of late Iron Age and early Roman 'objectscapes', through an examination of the circulation and selections of thousands of standardised pots, brooches, and other objects, ...

Author: Martin Pitts

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN: 9789048543878

Category: Design

Page:

View: 295

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Archaeologists working in northwest Europe have long remarked on the sheer quantity and standardisation of objects unearthed from the Roman period, especially compared with earlier eras. What was the historical significance of this boom in standardised objects? With a wide and ever-changing spectrum of innovative objects and styles to choose from, to what extent did the choices made by people in the past really matter? To answer these questions, this book sheds new light on the make-up of late Iron Age and early Roman 'objectscapes', through an examination of the circulation and selections of thousands of standardised pots, brooches, and other objects, with emphasis on funerary repertoires, c. 100 bc-ad 100. Breaking with the national frameworks that inform artefact research in much 'provincial' Roman archaeology, the book tests the idea that marked increases in the movement of people and objects fostered pan-regional culture(s) and transformed societies. Using a rich database of cemeteries and settlements spanning a swathe of northwest Europe, including southern Britannia, Gallia Belgica, and Germania Inferior, the study extensively applies multivariate statistics (such as Correspondence Analysis) to examine the roles of objects in an ever-changing and richly complex cultural milieu.
2019-08-17 By Martin Pitts

Author: Michael Ivanovitch Rostovtzeff

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:$B263938

Category: History, Ancient

Page:

View: 549

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Author: Barbara Pferdehirt

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:749951957

Category: Rome

Page: 24

View: 730

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The purpose of this volume is to explore how comparative archaeologies of insularitycan contribute to discourse on ancient Mediterranean “globalization.” The volume’s theme stems from a colloquium session that was chaired by the ...

Author: Anna Kouremenos

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781789253474

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 325

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Recently, complex interpretations of socio-cultural change in the ancientMediterranean world have emerged that challenge earlier models. Influenced bytoday’s hyper-connected age, scholars no longer perceive the Mediterranean as astatic place where “Greco-Roman” culture was dominant, but rather see it as adynamic and connected sea where fragmentation and uncertainty, along with mobilityand networking, were the norm. Hence, a current theoretical approach to studyingancient culture has been that of globalization. Certain eras of Mediterranean history (e.g., the Roman empire) known for their increased connectivity have thus beenanalyzed from a globalized perspective that examines rhizomal networking, culturaldiversity, and multiple processes of social change. Archaeology has proven a usefuldiscipline for investigating ancient “globalization” because of its recent focus on howidentity is expressed through material culture negotiated between both local andglobal influences when levels of connectivity are altered. One form of identity that has been inadequately explored in relation to globalizationtheory is insularity. Insularity, or the socially recognized differences expressed bypeople living on islands, is a form of self-identification created within a particularspace and time. Insularity, as a unique social identity affected by “global” forces,should be viewed as an important research paradigm for archaeologies concerned with re-examining cultural change. The purpose of this volume is to explore how comparative archaeologies of insularitycan contribute to discourse on ancient Mediterranean “globalization.” The volume’s theme stems from a colloquium session that was chaired by the volume’s co-editors atthe Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in January 2017. Given the current state of the field for globalization studies in Mediterranean archaeology,this volume aims to bring together for the first time archaeologists working ondifferent islands and a range of material culture types to examine diachronically how Mediterranean insularities changed during eras when connectivity increased, such asthe Late Bronze Age, the era of Greek and Phoenician colonization, the Classicalperiod, and during the High and Late Roman imperial eras. Each chapter aims tosituate a specific island or island group within the context of the globalizing forces and networks that conditioned a particular period, and utilizes archaeological material toreveal how islanders shaped their insular identities, or notions of insularity, at thenexus of local and global influences.
2020-06-30 By Anna Kouremenos

Investigates reasons behind the seemingly globalised visual culture that spread across the Late Antique world of the (earlier) Roman and (later) Byzantine Empire and beyond.

Author: Fabio Guidetti

Publisher:

ISBN: 1789254469

Category:

Page: 384

View: 779

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Late Antique artefacts, and the images they carry, attest to a highly connected visual culture from ca. 300 to 800 C.E. On the one hand, the same decorative motifs and iconographies are found across various genres of visual and material culture, irrespective of social and economic differences among their users - for instance in mosaics, architectural decoration, and luxury arts (silver plate, textiles, ivories), as well as in everyday objects such as tableware, lamps, and pilgrim vessels. On the other hand, they are also spread in geographically distant regions, mingled with local elements, far beyond the traditional borders of the classical world. At the same time, foreign motifs, especially of Germanic and Sasanian origin, are attested in Roman territories. This volume aims at investigating the reasons behind this seemingly globalised visual culture spread across the Late Antique world, both within the borders of the (former) Roman and (later) Byzantine Empire and beyond, bringing together diverse approaches characteristic of different national and disciplinary traditions. The presentation of a wide range of relevant case studies chosen from different geographical and cultural contexts exemplifies the vast scale of the phenomenon and demonstrates the benefit of addressing such a complex historical question with a combination of different theoretical approaches.
2020-06-15 By Fabio Guidetti

However , recently , archaeologists of the Roman world have been showing an
interest in the area of IR theory that is particularly relevant here : the theory of
globalization . Thinking about globalization in relation to the Roman world In
addition ...

Author: Anthea Harris

Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Limited

ISBN: 1407300784

Category: Social Science

Page: 104

View: 607

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This volume, the proceedings of a 2005 conference looks at long-distance contacts and exchange and the collapse and creation of international systems during late antiquity. Broadly the papers posit that the decay of the Roman state lead to more not less long distance contact, with the spread of world relgions and new technologies both indicators of, and causes of this process. There is a theoretical paper from Ken Dark, then a series of more specialised studies which look at trade with China, Ethiopia and India and at the use of bracteates and pottery ampullae as evidence of long-distance exchange.
2007 By Anthea Harris

This book offers a radically different argument about how traditions and global citizenship can meet, and suggests some important lessons for the contours of globalization in our own time.

Author: Adam K. Webb

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317486749

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 560

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Too often, observers of globalization take for granted that the common ground across cultures is a thin layer of consumerism and perhaps human rights. If so, then anything deeper and more traditional would be placebound, and probably destined for the dustbin of history. But must this be so? Must we assume--as both liberals and traditionalists now tend to do--that one cannot be a cosmopolitan and take traditions seriously at the same time? This book offers a radically different argument about how traditions and global citizenship can meet, and suggests some important lessons for the contours of globalization in our own time. Adam K. Webb argues that if we look back before modernity, we find a very different line of thinking about what it means to take the whole world as one’s horizon. Digging into some fascinating currents of thought and practice in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the early modern period, across all major civilizations, Webb is able to reveal patterns of "deep cosmopolitanism", with its logic quite unlike that of liberal globalization today. In their more cosmopolitan moments, everyone from clerics to pilgrims to empire-builders was inclined to look for deep ethical parallels—points of contact—among civilizations and traditions. Once modernity swept aside the old civilizations, however, that promise was largely forgotten. We now have an impoverished view of what it means to embrace a tradition and even what kinds of conversations across traditions are possible. In part two, Webb draws out the lessons of deep cosmopolitanism for our own time. If revived, it has something to say about everything from the rise of new non-Western powers like China and India and what they offer the world, to religious tolerance, to global civil society, to cross-border migration. Deep Cosmopolis traces an alternative strand of cosmopolitan thinking that cuts across centuries and civilizations. It advances a new perspective on world history, and a distinctive vision of globalization for this century which has the real potential to resonate with us all.
2015-05-15 By Adam K. Webb

This volume explores the proposition that the absorption of the Greek world into the Roman empire created a new emphasis upon local identities, much as globalisation in the modern world has done.

Author: Tim Whitmarsh

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108984975

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 815

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This volume explores the proposition that the absorption of the Greek world into the Roman empire created a new emphasis upon local identities, much as globalisation in the modern world has done. Localism became the focal point for complex debates: in some cases, it was complementary with imperial objectives, but in others tension can be discerned. The volume as a whole seeks to add texture and nuance to the existing literature on Greek identity, which has tended in recent years to emphasise the umbrella category of the Greek, to the detriment of specific polis and regional identities. It also contributes to the growing literature on the Romanisation of provinces, by emphasising the dialogue between a region's self-identification as a distinct space and its self-awareness as a component of the centrally-governed empire.
2021-01-21 By Tim Whitmarsh

It is clear evidence of the power of the idea of the Roman Empire , bound
together in and by a common culture , that the ... Nevertheless , as it is possible to
discuss the parameters of modern globalisation , identifying the forces that shape
the ...

Author: Neville Morley

Publisher: Pluto Press (UK)

ISBN: STANFORD:36105215365896

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 528

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Over a millennium after the end of its unrivalled dominance, the spectre of Rome figures highly in western culture. This book explores what the empire meant to its subjects.The idea of Rome has long outlived the physical empire that gave it form, and now holds sway over vastly more people and a far greater geographical area than the Romans ever ruled. It continues to shape our understanding of the nature of imperialism and influence the workings of the world. It is through the lens of Rome that we answer questions such as: How do empires grow? How are empires ruled? Do empires exploit their subjects or civilise them? Rejecting the simplistic narrative of military triumph followed by decline and fall, the books analyses the origins of Roman imperialism, its wide-ranging impact on the regions it conquered, and its continuing influence in debates about modern imperialism.
2010-08-15 By Neville Morley

The Holy Roman Empire was dissolved in 1806 , as Napoleon swept over
Europe . Its replacement was first the Confederation of the Rhine and then , from
1815 , a German Confederation of 35 monarchies and 4 free cities which lasted (
with ...

Author: B. H. Easton

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951D02773521D

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 234

View: 905

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This book is a clear, imaginative and wide-ranging picture of the globalising world, written for a general educated readership. It is not an argument for or against globalisation but a careful and thorough analysis of the issues involved, drawing on scholarly study and debate but avoiding technical issues and demanding detail. Organised in two parts, it explores the economic theory behind globalisation, then the political and social consequences and concludes with the various options for nations in a globalised world. Distinctive in setting globalisation in a historical context also inteprets it from the point of view of a small, rich economy. In each section individual chapter focus on a particular historical experience, typically in a single country; for example, a chapter on cities and industry economies of scale focuses on New York; one on technology transfer focuses on Japan; one on nationalism focuses on Germany
2007 By B. H. Easton

Shortly after , a monk spoke prophetically to Rudolf of how his act of worship and
generosity would grant him and his descendants the world's riches and power .
The story took place in 1261 , 17 years before Rudolf was crowned Holy Roman
 ...

Author: Nelia Hyndman-Rizk

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Pub

ISBN: UCLA:L0103987939

Category: Religion

Page: 210

View: 475

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This edited collection brings together a series of ethnographically grounded studies on sacred and secular pilgrimage in the age of globalisation from around the world. Pilgrimage is explored as a distinctive form of mobility in late modernity, which emphasises inner transformation. Thus, the studies in this volume show how pilgrimage unifies physical and metaphysical mobility into a holistic project of self-realisation through motion.

History is littered with such debates as to the role of imperialism on indigenous
culture , from the Roman Empire to the British Empire as the culture of the
dominant country came to be imposed around the known world . History is also
full of ...

Author: Bob Milward

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: STANFORD:36105118023113

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 198

View: 973

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Bob Milward presents an alternative view of globalization and argues that indeed there has been a continuum in capitalist development, but that this has been forged by historical processes and the dynamism of the competitive forces of capitalism. Milward identifies the emergence of monopoly capitalism as an important shaping factor, and in so doing sheds new light on issues of underdevelopment, multi-national imperialism and crises in advanced capitalist economies.
2003 By Bob Milward

Capital is intrinsically expansive and global . Its characteristic stems from the
basic logic that capital has to expand or perish . Some would go beyond to the
Roman Empire and venture to observe that globalisation was always an
aspiration of ...

Author: Kurmana Simha Chalam

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015070142511

Category: Dalits

Page: 30

View: 648

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