Search Results for adverse-childhood-experiences-aces

Delinquency, crime committed by youth, continues to persist even though recent estimates show decline.

Author: Emily Wible

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1198249413

Category: Child abuse

Page: 104

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Delinquency, crime committed by youth, continues to persist even though recent estimates show decline. Foster care youth are especially at risk as they are overrepresented in the criminal justice system and have a higher likelihood of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). ACEs have been directly correlated with crime and delinquency for both adults and youth. However, there has not been much research done on the special population of foster care youth and how their experiences relate to delinquency. This study examined this relationship, as well as how gender differences affect the relationship between ACEs and delinquency for foster care youth. This study utilized secondary data obtained through ICPSR from Cusick, Courtney, Havlicek, and Hess (2010). The researcher examined how ACEs relate to three delinquency outcomes: foster care youth’s self-reported arrest record, official arrest record, and self-reported responses on their diversity of delinquency. The researcher found that alcohol or substance abuse diagnosis was significant in predicting self-reported arrest, official arrest, and the measured delinquency items for the total, male-only, and female-only populations. Caregiver closeness and mental health diagnosis were significant for the male-only population and not having a mother or stepmother was significant for the female-only population in predicting delinquency.
2019 By Emily Wible

This book presents a whole child, whole family, whole community overview of what ACEs means to families, children and young people in the North East of England and Cumbria.

Author: Ruth Whiteside

Publisher:

ISBN: 109650040X

Category:

Page: 204

View: 969

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This book presents a whole child, whole family, whole community overview of what ACEs means to families, children and young people in the North East of England and Cumbria. These regions of England have some of the highest levels of childhood adversity in England and this is reflected in the higher levels of risk taking behaviours young people take. It is clear that Adverse Childhood Experiences are a 'big deal' in the North for this generation and the next. Time for discussion is a luxury these families do not have. If not now- when? If not us- who? The book was written and developed in support of the Great North ACE conference 2019 at St James Park and provides the basis of understanding ACEs: why all the fuss and is applicable for any area anywhere in understanding why we need to see the whole child, the whole family and the whole community.
2019-05 By Ruth Whiteside

Mental health has become a national health crisis, with suicide as the second leading cause of death for 10 to 34-year-olds.

Author: Cynthia Lee Mackay-Neorr

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1137279914

Category:

Page: 173

View: 939

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Mental health has become a national health crisis, with suicide as the second leading cause of death for 10 to 34-year-olds. One in five college students experiences anxiety or depression, to the extent that it is hard for them to function. Compounding the effects of college-related stress, student exposure to childhood adversity has been associated with anxiety, depression, and PTSD. ACEs refer to childhood abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction. The landmark ACEs study found significant links between childhood trauma and risk for chronic disease, social, and emotional problems in adulthood. Individuals with three or more ACEs have an increased risk of negative health outcomes. ACEs are also a global public health issue, with over 275 million children worldwide experiencing some form of violence in the home. Nationally, over half of the population has experienced at least one ACE, and 25% report two or more.ACEs, toxic stress, and poor health outcomes are particularly problematic for college students, considering stress-related (mal)adaptive coping strategies that negatively impact students before and during college. The purpose of this study was to understand and describe the characteristics and prevalence of college students most at risk for high ACEs and determine the association between college student ACEs and academic success. A quantitative correlational survey design was used to determine the relationship between ACEs scores and first-generation status among college students. ACEs scores and demographic data were used to determine prediction values for GPA. Archival data consisted of online student survey responses (N = 1,197) collected from an exploratory study investigating the relationship between ACEs and methods for which college students navigate stress. The instrument included four separate adapted surveys, including participant demographics, and was administered over three terms.Findings demonstrated 59% of students reported at least one ACE, 38% experienced two or more ACEs, and high ACEs totaled 22%. Mann-Whitney U results indicated higher ACEs among first-generation students as compared to multigenerational students. Multiple regression significantly predicted lower GPA for students identifying as first-generation, male, African American/Black, or multiple race/ethnicity, and students with high ACEs. Evidence-based practice implications and recommendations for future research are discussed.

This guide provides healthcare students and professionals with a foundational background on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) – traumatic early life experiences, which can have a profound impact on health in later life.

Author: Roberta Waite

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429536793

Category: Medical

Page: 172

View: 553

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This guide provides healthcare students and professionals with a foundational background on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) – traumatic early life experiences, which can have a profound impact on health in later life. ACEs can include being a victim of abuse, neglect or exposure to risk in the home or community. How healthcare students and professionals learn to recognize, react and respond to persons affected by trauma will lay the foundation for their relationships with patients. This book intentionally uses micro-to-macro lenses accompanied by a structural competency framework to elucidate health implications across the lifespan. It explores the nature of adversity and its effects on the physical, emotional, cognitive and social health of individuals, communities and society. The book, written by two experienced psychiatric nurses, will equip healthcare students and professionals with an understanding for critical change in practice and offer action steps designed to assist them with prevention and intervention approaches and steps to help build resilience. This book will be core reading for healthcare students within mental health, pediatric and primary care nursing courses. It will also be of interest to students and professionals in the social work, psychology and public health fields who are exploring resilience and trauma-informed practices
2019-08-09 By Roberta Waite

However, it has been more recent, over the past 20 years since the 1998
publication of the ACE Study by Felitti et al. (1998), that the term adverse
childhood experiences, or ACEs in abbreviated form, has been more consistently
used in the ...

Author: Gordon J. G. Asmundson

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 9780128160664

Category: Education

Page: 384

View: 509

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Adverse Childhood Experiences: Using Evidence to Advance Research, Practice, Policy, and Prevention defines ACEs, provides a summary of the past 20 years of ACEs research, as well as provides guidance for the future directions for the field. It includes a review of the original ACEs Study, definitions of ACEs, and how ACEs are typically assessed. Other content includes a review of how ACEs are related to mental and physical health outcome, the neurodevelopmental mechanisms linking ACEs to psychopathology, sexual violence and sexual health outcomes, and violence across the lifespan. Important and contemporary issues in the field, like reconsidering how ACEs should be defined and assessed, the appropriateness of routine ACEs screening, thinking about ACEs from a public health and global perspective, strategies for preventing ACEs, understanding ACEs and trauma-informed care and resilience, and the importance of safe stable and nurturing environments for children are discussed. Adverse Childhood Experiences is a useful evidence-based resource for professionals working with children and families, including physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, lawyers, judges, as well as public health leaders, policy makers, and government delegates. Reviews the past 20 years of ACEs research Examines ACEs and mental and physical health Discusses the neurodevelopment mechanisms of ACEs and psychopathology Examines ACEs and violence across the lifespan Reconsiders the definition and assessment of ACEs Examines the issue of routine ACEs screening Discusses ACEs from a public health and global perspective Summarizes effective ACEs prevention, trauma-informed care, and resilience Provides recommendations for the future directions of the ACEs field
2019-10-03 By Gordon J. G. Asmundson

Scores ranged from 0 to 8 (median 1). Of these, 8 people had experienced at least 1 ACE and 5 had scores u2265 4.Table 1.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1163806299

Category:

Page:

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IntroductionThe relationship between ACEs (including physical and sexual abuse, witnessing domestic violence or growing up with household substance abuse) and poorer health outcomes is well established. A history of ACEs increases risks of health-harming behaviours and affects neurological, immunological and hormonal development but is not routinely considered in a live donor population. We have begun to measure ACEs as part of the psychological assessment of people offering a directed and non-directed kidney donation. MethodsAll potential live kidney donors attending the Renal Psychology Service for a pre-donation assessment completed the GP ACE questionnaire (adapted by Public Health Wales, 2015), alongside measures of psychological well-being and a semi-structured interview.ResultsTo date 11 donors (6 Male/5 female; mean age 49) have completed the ACE questionnaire. Scores ranged from 0 to 8 (median 1). Of these, 8 people had experienced at least 1 ACE and 5 had scores u2265 4.Table 1. Prevalence of Individual ACEs ACEtttttPrevalence (%)Child Maltreatment:tttVerbal abusetttt27Physical abusett 18Sexual abusett 18Neglectt 18Childhood Household Included:tParental sep/divorce t 36Domestic Violence t 18Mental Illnesst 36Alcohol abuset 36Drug uset 9Incarceration t 9DiscussionACEs were prevalent and higher than those previously found in the general population in Wales (Public Health Wales, 2015); 45% scored u2265 4 compared with 13.6% in the general population. Currently there is no evidence to exclude donors on the basis of a high ACE score but renal psychologists are well placed to counsel donors with a history of trauma and offer appropriate psycho-education. Further research into the long term health outcomes of donors with high ACE scores may contribute to an understanding of a potential link between childhood trauma and subsequent risk in live kidney donors.
2017 By

Secretion in Women with Adverse Childhood Experiences 5.2 ABSTRACT
Background: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) predispose individuals to
the development of mental and stress-related bodily disorders in adulthood,
including ...

Author: Gunther Pascal Meinlschmidt

Publisher: Cuvillier Verlag

ISBN: 9783865375865

Category: Child psychology

Page: 181

View: 632

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term adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) has its origins in a body of research
conducted by the Centers for Disease ... of the three categories of adverse
childhood experiences (ACEs)—Abuse, Family/Household Challenges, and
Neglect; ...

Author: Victoria E. Romero

Publisher: Corwin Press

ISBN: 9781544319452

Category: Education

Page: 248

View: 563

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Use trauma-informed strategies to give students the skills and support they need to succeed in school and life Nearly half of all children have been exposed to at least one adverse childhood experience (ACE), such as poverty, divorce, neglect, substance abuse, or parent incarceration. This workbook-style resource shows K-12 educators how to integrate trauma-informed strategies into daily instructional practice through expanded focus on: The experiences and challenges of students impacted by ACEs, including suicidal tendencies, cyberbullying, and drugs Behavior as a form of communication and how to explicitly teach new behaviors How to mitigate trauma and build innate resiliency
2018-05-22 By Victoria E. Romero

REVIEW OF RELEVANT LITERATURE Adverse Childhood Experiences, Mental
Health, and the Rural Context The impetus for the original adverse childhood
experience (ACE) study began in 1985 at the Kaiser Permanente obesity clinic in
 ...

Author: R. Martin Reardon

Publisher: IAP

ISBN: 9781648021145

Category: Psychology

Page: 365

View: 824

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Recent crises—whether policy-induced (e.g., family separation at the Mexico/U.S. border) or natural disaster-related (e.g., hurricanes in Florida and North Carolina and wildfires in California)—have galvanized the attention of the U.S. and international public on the plight of children who endure these traumatic events. The sheer enormity of such wrenching events tend to overshadow the trauma endured by many children whose everyday life circumstances fall short of affording them a safe, stable, and nurturing environment. At the national level, three rounds of data collection spanning January 2008 through April 2014 constituted the National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV) that—according to Finkelhor, Turner, Shattuck, and Hambly (2013) in reporting on the 2011 round—assessed “a wide range of childhood victimizations” (pp. 614-615). Among many other findings, Finkelor et al. concluded that “overall, 57.7% of the children and youth had experienced or witnessed at least 1 to 5 aggregate exposures (assaults and bullying, sexual victimization, maltreatment by a caregiver, property victimization, or witnessing victimization) in the year before this survey” (p. 619). According to the recent re-visiting of NatSCEV II by Turner et al. (2017), “almost 1 in 4 children and adolescents ages 5-15 in the United States lived in family environments with only modest levels of safety, stability, and nurturance, while about 1 in 15 had consistently low levels across multiple domains” (p. 8). Adverse childhood events (ACEs) have both immediate and long-term impacts on children’s health and well-being (Banyard, Hambly, & Grych, 2017; Bowen, Jarrett, Stahl, Forrester, & Valmaggia, 2018; Walker & Walsh, 2015). Children do not shed their entanglement with ACEs at the schoolroom door. To highlight just one study, Jimenez, Wade, Lin, Morrow, & Reichman (2016) conducted a secondary analysis of a national urban birth cohort and found that experiencing ACEs in early childhood was “associated with below-average, teacher-reported academic and literacy skills and [more] behavior problems in kindergarten” (p. 1). Chapter Proposals For this fifth volume in the Current Perspectives on School/University/Community Research series, we invite chapter proposals from authors who are engaged in school-university-community collaborative educational research focused on the alleviation of the educational impact of adverse childhood experiences. Authors may submit proposals to discuss research projects that have been completed or that are still in progress, but all proposals should clearly indicate the engagement of stakeholders from each of the three categories (school, university, and community). Chapter proposals of no more than 500 words are welcome. Please cite at least 10 sources and include a reference page. The proposal cover page must contain the author’s full contact information. For multiple authored proposals, please list all authors’ contact information and indicate the corresponding author. Decisions will be made and communicated by March 25, 2019, and a Manual for Authors will be provided to accepted corresponding authors. At all stages, manuscripts must conform to 6th edition APA conventions. Following the submission of full chapter drafts on June 3, 2019, a blind review process among the corresponding authors will be conducted and feedback communicated by June 24, 2019. (See Projected 2019 Deadlines.) Full chapters will range from 7,000 to 8,000 words in Times New Roman 12, double spaced text, inclusive of title, abstract, manuscript, and references and are to be submitted to the volume editors as a Microsoft Word email attachment by August 26, 2019. Graphics and images may be included. See Author Guidelines. Projected 2019 Deadlines Chapter Proposals: February 28, 2019 Notification of Invitation to Contribute Chapter: March 25, 2019 Submission of Draft Chapters for Blind Peer Review: June 3, 2019 Return of Blind Peer Reviewed Chapters to Authors: June 24, 2019 Submission of Revised Chapters: August 26, 2019 Submission of Final Chapters to IAP: October 21, 2019 Anticipated Publication in Spring 2020
2020-05-01 By R. Martin Reardon

Author: Casey Balio

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1143741595

Category: Health

Page: 12

View: 441

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2018 By Casey Balio

This book gives hope to those who have lived in the shadows of pain and vulnerability from trauma in their childhood. His adopted grand daughter was a 7 ACE score...and after 9 years of love from the family...feels like a ZERO!

Author: John Richard Trayser

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1523710195

Category:

Page: 106

View: 710

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John's book does a superb job of giving hope on how to prevent ACEs and has remarkable results for EVERY FAMILY THAT READS THE SECOND PART OF THE BOOK OUT LOUD TOGETHER! Conversations will begin that are essential to heartfelt communication. The ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences) study details the significant impact of childhood trauma on the emotional and physical well being for the remainder of your life. John's book does a great job of showing the IMPACT of ACEs in all phases of our lives...and WE ARE ALL IMPACTED...even if you have zero ACEs yourself. This book gives hope to those who have lived in the shadows of pain and vulnerability from trauma in their childhood. His adopted grand daughter was a 7 ACE score...and after 9 years of love from the family...feels like a ZERO! You can change your stars with LOVE.
2016-01-25 By John Richard Trayser

The purpose of the present study was to replicate the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study framework, using relationship outcomes, and studied within the context of couple relationships.

Author: Michael Redd

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1086381534

Category: Adult child abuse victims

Page: 148

View: 289

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The purpose of the present study was to replicate the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study framework, using relationship outcomes, and studied within the context of couple relationships. A thorough review of the literature on trauma, its prevalence, prior studies on ACEs, trauma and couples, and partner selection is presented. A secondary data analysis of 146 couples from a clinical source was used to test the present study's hypotheses. Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM) was used to test the hypothesis that an individual's ACE exposure history would be negatively related to both their own and their partner's reported relationship quality. A cluster analysis was used to test the hypothesis that couples could be statistically grouped by ACE score combinations, and an ANOVA was used to test average group differences on relationship quality. Regression analyses were used to test hypotheses about partner selection. Results from the analysis include: (1) a small but significant negative impact of an individual's ACEs on their own reported relationship quality, but no finding of a significant impact on their partner's reported relationship quality; (2) a small but significant relationship between partner ACE scores; (3) a preliminary ability to group couples by ACE score combinations into three clusters (Low-Low, High-Moderate, Moderate-High) and a small but significant difference between two of the clusters; (4) an increased likelihood that couples will be partnered with those who have more similar than different ACE scores, and a significant trend that as ACEs increase, the likelihood of being partnered with someone who has similar ACEs will decrease; (5) a small but significant dose-response relationship between increasing ACEs and the likelihood of being partnered with someone who has more than minimal ACEs. Further discussion of the results, implications, limitations of the study, and future research directions are also included.
2017 By Michael Redd

Author: Charlotte Grey (Researcher)

Publisher:

ISBN: 1910768758

Category: Abused children

Page: 48

View: 379

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It is well established that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are linked to health and emotional outcomes.

Author: Carolina Otero

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1076683640

Category:

Page: 57

View: 401

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It is well established that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are linked to health and emotional outcomes. But less is known about the relationship between ACEs and educational attainment—a potentially important feature of educational stratification in America. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), a nationally representative youth study of 7-12th grade students in the 1994-95 school year, I investigate whether ACEs is linked to post-secondary attainment and examine the role of health and socio-emotional factors as mediators. Results confirm that there is a graded relationship between ACEs and timely bachelor’s degree attainment. I find that an additional ACE decreases the odds of timely bachelor’s degree attainment by about 17%, even after accounting for other related factors.
2018 By Carolina Otero

Child maltreatment is associated with internalizing and externalizing symptoms across the lifespan.

Author: James E. Barnett (Dissertant)

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1190650393

Category: Adult child abuse victims

Page: 78

View: 512

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Child maltreatment is associated with internalizing and externalizing symptoms across the lifespan. Maltreatment often co-occurs with other adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), such as parental incarceration or substance use. Studies have examined child maltreatment and other ACEs mostly independently, and both variables have been linked to poor adult functioning, such as insecure attachments. However, research discerning the unique contributions of maltreatment versus ACEs in predicting developmental outcomes is limited. For example, it is unclear if these connections to adult functioning persist across both early and middle adulthood. Recent studies suggest that maltreatment and ACEs uniquely predicting socioemotional problems. However, other studies suggest they are similar in impact, supporting a general "cumulative risk" perspective. Understanding the possible unique contributions of maltreatment versus other ACEs is necessary for full conceptualization of the ACEs and cumulative risk constructs and may. Clarity of these constructs may inform approaches to intake assessment in healthcare and social service settings by exploring the parsimonious utility of the ACE measure to screen for risks that may derail stage-salient task completion. This study examined 379 young (under age 30) and middle-aged (30-60 years) adults in a community sample who answered life experience questions. First, participants were asked about 12 different ACEs (household domestic violence, parental incarceration, parental drug use, parental mental illness, etc.). Additionally, childhood maltreatment was measured by asking participants about their histories of sexual and physical abuse and neglect. Participants were asked to describe their typical relationship patterns with intimate partners in order to assess adult attachment styles. Three hierarchical regression analyses examined the unique contributions of ACEs and maltreatment to the outcomes of avoidant, anxious, and fearful adult attachment quality. Greater numbers of ACEs and maltreatment experiences were related to all insecure attachment styles; moreover, maltreatment failed to predict significant variance above and beyond that explained by ACEs. Regression results did not differ by age or gender. Therefore, maltreatment may be categorized as part of a general cumulative risk profile that does not uniquely predict adult socioemotional outcomes. These findings lend credence to a cumulative risk model, suggesting that the types of ACEs matter less than the accumulated experience of chronic risk when predicting socioemotional outcomes. In practice, this finding suggests that intake/assessment in healthcare and social service settings may better predict future outcomes by tracking a wide array of adversities instead of focusing on specific risks. Moreover, a parsimonious ACE screening tool may expedite the screening process for negative health and psychological outcomes, resulting in more efficient client referral and treatment. Furthermore, similar regression findings between the young and middle-aged adults suggests that the impacts of collective childhood adversity may linger across time, potentially interrupting stage-salient task completion across the lifespan.

An adverse childhood experience (ACE) is a negative life event experienced during childhood such as abuse, neglect, and witnessing domestic violence.

Author: Jessie Bridgewater

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1224543337

Category:

Page: 66

View: 641

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An adverse childhood experience (ACE) is a negative life event experienced during childhood such as abuse, neglect, and witnessing domestic violence. ACEs have traditionally been measured using a cumulative score, but recent studies have demonstrated the importance of considering ACE type and impact. The former refers to ACE categories, such as childhood maltreatment, while the latter refers to how an individual rates the current impact an ACE(s) is continuing to have on their lives (e.g., mostly positive vs. mostly negative). Furthermore, although many studies have found ethnic differences in the number of ACEs, the majority of these studies consist of primarily White samples. Additionally, while a vast portion of the literature delineates the negative outcomes associated with enduring ACEs, there are some individuals who effectively adapt in the face of adversity. Although adaptive functioning is often assessed using a total score, there is extensive support for examining multi-domain functioning. To address the lack of diversity (i.e., age and ethnicity) of past studies, the sample of the current study was comprised of young adults (i.e., 18-29) of diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds. Additionally, the current study addressed gaps in the literature by examining how the relationships among ACE predictors and adaptive functioning outcomes varied depending on the measurement of these constructs. Furthermore, the influence of ACE type and race/ethnicity was also explored. Results indicated that the relationship between ACEs and adaptive functioning do change depending on how these constructs are measured and when ACE type and race/ethnicity are accounted for. Future studies should further explore the relationship between ACEs and domains of adaptive functioning among young adults of diverse backgrounds.

Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and its supplements, this series of studies examines 1) the differences in household out-of-pocket medical costs by the number of ACEs that individuals have experienced, 2) intergenerational ...

Author: Adam Schickedanz

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1047733496

Category:

Page: 204

View: 782

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Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have well-described life-course health correlates including higher risk of common chronic mental and physical illnesses. There is little evidence on the potential medical costs associated with experiencing more ACEs, nor on the associations between ACEs in parents and maltreatment or behavioral health problems in their children. Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and its supplements, this series of studies examines 1) the differences in household out-of-pocket medical costs by the number of ACEs that individuals have experienced, 2) intergenerational associations and mediators between parents' reported ACEs and ACEs reported by their adult children, and 3) the risk of child behavioral problems as a function of parent ACE counts. I find that increases in self-reported ACE scores are associated with increases in out-of-pocket medical expenses, showing a novel link within individuals between health care costs to the ACE score. Across generations, I find that parent mental health and parenting attitudes partially mediate the associations between parents' and children's ACE scores. I show that children's behavioral health problems, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and childhood emotional disturbance diagnoses, are positively associated with their parents' ACE scores with partial mediation by parent mental health and parenting attitudes as well. These findings extend the growing literature on ACEs and suggest opportunities to improve clinical practice through risk stratification based on ACE scores. These studies also validate an approach for studying ACEs and their financial and health consequences using the PSID.

Cumulative childhood trauma has been associated with both symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.

Author: Ilana Starr Berman

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1054248197

Category: Children

Page: 222

View: 396

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Cumulative childhood trauma has been associated with both symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. However, few studies have examined these relations with normative young adult populations nor have they explored the relation between childhood adversities and cognitive distortions as an outcome variable. The current study aimed to: 1) replicate and extend research on the relations between cumulative adversity, using a broad measure of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs; Felitti et al., 1998), which assesses both maltreatment (e.g., physical, sexual, emotional abuse and neglect) and exposure to elements of household dysfunction (e.g., caregiver substance use, witnessing maternal abuse), and mental health outcomes (i.e., symptoms of PTSD and depression) with a relatively high-functioning young adult sample of female college students, and 2) examine if the dose-response relation frequently found between ACEs and negative distress outcomes also existed with cognitive distortions, a common post-traumatic response and target of trauma-specific treatments that is rarely examined as an outcome variable. Participants (N = 252) were female undergraduate university students who were primarily white and reported a range of traumatic experiences. I hypothesized that increases in number of types of ACEs would be positively related to increases in post-traumatic stress and depressive symptoms, as well as the three domains of maladaptive cognitions on a measure of global beliefs, the Posttraumatic Maladaptive Beliefs Scale (PMBS; Vogt et al., 2012). Controlling for adverse experiences since age 18, results of hierarchical regression analyses supported the hypotheses and indicated greater endorsement of ACEs was positively related to increases in post-traumatic stress and depressive symptoms, as well as increases in all three domains of the PMBS: Threat of Harm, Reliability & Trustworthiness of Others, and Self-Worth & Judgment.

By integrating existing knowledge about (ACEs) with developmental research on preventing, buffering, and treating the effects of adversity, stress, and trauma on child development and subsequent health and functioning, this book identifies ...

Author: Jennifer Hays-Grudo

Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)

ISBN: 1433832119

Category: Psychology

Page: 236

View: 125

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This book provides an interdisciplinary lens from which to view the multiple types of effects of enduring childhood experiences, and to recommend evidence-based approaches for protecting and buffering children and repairing the negative consequences of ACEs as adults.

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with social, emotional, and cognitive impairments resulting from disrupted neurodevelopment.

Author: Morgan Thompson

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1056192609

Category: College students

Page: 116

View: 975

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Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with social, emotional, and cognitive impairments resulting from disrupted neurodevelopment. These impairments manifest as health risk behaviors (HRBs) including tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, illicit drug use, and sexual risk behaviors. The current study assessed the relation between ACEs and HRBs by examining the cognitive abilities of 144 college students (M = 18.92 years; 56.3% female; 63.9% White; M = .078 ACEs). Participants completed an interview (parental incarceration, Criminogenic Cognitions Scale), surveys (Youth Risk Behavior Survey, ACE Questionnaire), delay discounting task, the Tower of Hanoi, and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test. Results revealed a graded relationship between ACE scores and illicit drug use risk behaviors, ACE scores and sexual risk behaviors, and household criminality and sexual risk behaviors. Students who reported more ACEs had an increase in the likelihood of reporting illicit drug use and sexual risk behaviors. Although no significant mediation effects of cognitive impairment were observed, a path analysis model revealed that a subscale of the Criminogenic Cognitions Scale (Negative Attitudes toward Authority) mediated the relation between ACE scores and sexual risk behaviors. These findings demonstrate the cognitive impairments may not serve as the best explanation for the relation between ACEs and HRBs in college students. However, these findings do indicate that a universal approach to preventing and reducing HRBs among at-risk college students may be inappropriate. Rather, it may be best to target specific HRBs.
2017 By Morgan Thompson

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