Search Results for 5th-enoch-letter-of-enoch

Book of Eve 5. Book of Adam ENOCH AND METATRON SERIES: • 1st Enoch: Book of the Watchers • 2nd Enoch: Book of Parables • 3rd Enoch: Astronomical Book • 4th Enoch: Dream Visions • 5th Enoch: Letter of Enoch • Secrets of Enoch • Ascension ...

Author: Scriptural Research Institute

Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

ISBN: 9781989604168

Category: Religion

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The Letter of Jeremiah was included in the Septuagint, generally, after Lamentations, which was likewise traditionally attributed to Jeremiah or Baruch. This letter claims to be the letter that Jeremiah had written for the Judahites that had been taken away as captives when the Babylonians conquered Judah, as described in the Book of Judah, that Baruch took to Babylon. There are several letters included in the Book of Jeremiah that are attributed to Jeremiah, as well as a letter in the Book of Baruch that claims to be Jeremiah’s letter to the Judahites in Babylonia. The authenticity of the Letter of Jeremiah has been debated throughout its existence, for multiple reasons, including the content of the letter itself, which seems to be implying Judahites should not stop worshiping the sun, moon, and stars, to worship the idols of Babylon. The worship of the sun, moon, and stars was banned by King Josiah, the son-in-law of Jeremiah, under what was most likely Jeremiah's spiritual leadership, in order to promote the god Yahweh. This policy was clearly reversed under the reign of King Jehoiakim, and the prophet Jeremiah appears to have spent much of Jehoiakim’s rule in prison. Baruch was sent by the Judahite court to be Jeremiah’s scribe, however, Baruch clearly described his god as being the sun in the Book of Baruch, which he identified as having the sacred name of Amen. In 1st Ezra, the Egyptian King Necho II also identified the Judahite god as being the sun god, meaning the Judahites at the time of Jeremiah and Baruch, were predominantly worshiping the sun like the surrounding kingdoms, nevertheless, Jeremiah urged them to abandon sun-worship, and worship Yahweh. Therefore, the Letter of Jeremiah was almost certainly not written by Jeremiah, although might have been written by Baruch. This is the general Catholic interpretation, and the Letter of Jeremiah is inserted as the final chapter of the Book of Baruch in Catholic Bibles. The history of the Letter and its place in the Christian canon has been debated since the earliest surviving Christian writings on it. Origen of Alexandria, writing in the early-3rd-century AD, considered the Book of Jeremiah, Lamentations, and the Letter of Jeremiah to be one bigger Book of Jeremiah. Epiphanius of Salamis, writing in the late-3rd-century, considered the Book of Jeremiah, Book of Baruch, Lamentations, and the Letter of Jeremiah to be one bigger Book of Jeremiah. This view was repeated by Athanasius I of Alexandria in the mid-4th-century, and Cyril of Jerusalem in the late-4th-century. The view that the Septuagint’s Book of Jeremiah, Book of Baruch, Lamentations, and the Letter of Jeremiah are one large Book of Jeremiah was then canonized by the Council of Laodicea in 364 AD. The idea that the Letter of Jeremiah should not be part of Biblical canon is traced to Jerome, the translator of the original official Latin translation of the Bible, in the late-4th-century. The Masorites, a Jewish sect of scribes, had been copying a Hebrew translation of the scriptures that included books of Jeremiah and Lamentations, but not Baruch or the Letter. Jerome interpreted this as evidence that the Book of Baruch and the Letter of Jeremiah originated in Greek, and were not originally Judahite or Samaritan works, like the texts the Masorites were copying. As a result, he relegated the two Greek works to the Apocrypha section of his Bible, where they have generally stayed in Catholic and Protestant bibles ever since. Fragments of the Letter of Jeremiah have been discovered among the Dead Sea Scrolls, written in Hebrew, and dated to circa 100 BC, so the letter did not originate in Greek. The Eastern Orthodox Bibles continued to include the Letter of Jeremiah, as did the Ethiopian Tewahedo Bibles, which includes the Letter as part of Paralipomena of Jeremiah, along with 4th Baruch.

Book of Eve 5. Book of Adam ENOCH AND METATRON SERIES: 1. 1st Enoch: Book of the Watchers 2. 2nd Enoch: Book of Parables 3. 3rd Enoch: Astronomical Book 4. 4th Enoch: Dream Visions 5. 5th Enoch: Letter of Enoch 6. Secrets of Enoch 7.

Author: Scriptural Research Institute

Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

ISBN: 9781989852774

Category: History

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Thoth the Nobleman was a herald of Queen Hatshepsut and her young son Thutmose III, who seems to have died while she was still ruling Egypt, as his autobiography refers to her as the King of Egypt. After she died, Thutmose III tried to remove all records to her being king, although she was still mentioned in newly written biographies as the 'divine wife' and 'chief royal wife' of the Pharaoh Thutmose II. Thoth the Nobleman reports that he was trusted by Queen Hatshepsut more than anyone else, as he kept quiet about what was happening in the palace. This statement may not be entirely true as the architect Senenmut is generally considered to have been her lover. Another theory is that Senenmut may have been a homosexual friend of hers, which would then open the possibility that Thoth the Nobleman was her lover. Graffiti depicting a female or hermaphrodite pharaoh having sex with a man was discovered in an incomplete temple near the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, which is generally assumed to have been a representation of Senenmut, however, only the image survives without any writing that identifies the man, who could have been any Egyptian man, including Thoth the Nobleman, or simply intended as a representative figure of a generic male intended to insult the 'king' by depicting 'him' as a female. As this graffiti is depicted close to the massive and iconic Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, it is clear that at least some of the men in Egypt did not view her as a 'king' even late in her reign, which supports the rebellion of the 'Wicked-Evil Kushan' in the Syrian Rivers province for the first eight years of her reign in the Septuagint's Book of Judges. Thoth the Nobleman described working on many major projects throughout the reign of Queen Hatshepsut, including her Mortuary Temple, the Temples at Karnak, and the mysterious Hahut, a great sanctuary of Amen on his horizon in the west, which may have been an early reference to the Oracle Temple of Amen in the Siwa Oasis. Thoth the Nobleman also reported working on the ceremonial boat of Amen called 'Amen's Mighty of Prow.' Three centuries later, when the High Priest of Amen Her-Heru attempted to replicate this deed, it led to the problematic Voyage of Wenamen.

Book of Eve 5. Book of Adam ENOCH AND METATRON SERIES: 1. 1st Enoch: Book of the Watchers 2. 2nd Enoch: Book of Parables 3. 3rd Enoch: Astronomical Book 4. 4th Enoch: Dream Visions 5. 5th Enoch: Letter of Enoch 6. Secrets of Enoch 7.

Author: Scriptural Research Institute

Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

ISBN: 9781989852781

Category: History

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Thutmose III was the king of Egypt between circa 1458 and 1425 BC, after inheriting the throne from his father c and his aunt Hatshepsut, however, after Hatshepsut died Thutmose III claimed to have been the king of Egypt throughout Hatshepsut’s reign, meaning his regal years began circa 1479 BC when his father Thutmose II died. This attempt to erase Hatshepsut as a king of Egypt was likely not personal, as he did not attempt to usurp her authority during his life, but more likely an attempt to restore the respect for the kingship that appears to have been lost while Hatshepsut was on the throne. The graffiti of Hatshepsut having sex with a man, found near her mortuary temple clearly shows that she was not respected the way the previous god-like pharaohs had been, and Thutmose III was almost certainly trying to erase was many Egyptians viewed as a distasteful episode of their history. Ironically, her mortuary temple is viewed as one of the greatest architectural monuments of the New Kingdom and served as the bases of all later mortuary temples of the New Kingdom. Thutmose III did not attempt to erase Hatshepsut’s existence from Egyptian history, just her kingship, and she was still spoken of fondly as the ‘queen’ and ‘favorite wife of Thutmose II.’ It is accepted that he was only 2 years old when his father died and he became king in 1479 BC, although Hatshepsut held power as king until she died in 1458 BC. The two-year-old Thutmose III’s reign was established by Queen Hatshepsut over the objections of other claimants, as, she claimed that her husband Thutmose II had wanted Thutmose III to become king. Her reasons are not clear, and it is debated whether she was simply trying to seize power for herself and using her two-year-old nephew and step-son as a pawn, or following the legitimate wishes of her husband. Even her gender identity seems to have been in question, as there is evidence that she took her sister Iset, Thutmoses III’s mother, as her great royal wife and queen. This may have also been to protect Thutmose III, as Iset could claim the co-regency if something happened to her, however, she does appear to have lived as a man, treating Thutmose III as her own son. Whether this behavior was an affectation due to the male-dominated culture they lived in, or a genuine male-identity may never be known, however, she is claimed as a hero to feminists and transgender-people today. Her reign seems to have been one of contracting frontiers, as Egypt appears to have lost control of Syria early in her reign, which Thutmose III quickly reversed, launching an invasion of Syria within his first year on the throne. This was the legionary Siege of Megiddo, against the king of Kadesh and his Syrian allies, inscribed in detail in the Annals of Thutmose III at Karnak. The details of the battle inscribed at Karnak, were copied from Thutmose III’s scribe Tjaneni’s journal, and is a far more detailed account than the subsequent list of battles and plunder taken during Thutmose III’s subsequent invasions of Northern Canaan and the Mitanni Empire in modern Syria, or his campaign against the Nubians.

Slavonic Life of Adam and Eve 5. Book of Adam ENOCH AND METATRON SERIES: 1. 1st Enoch: Book of the Watchers 2. 2nd Enoch: Book of Parables 3. 3rd Enoch: Astronomical Book 4. 4th Enoch: Dream Visions 5. 5th Enoch: Letter of Enoch 6.

Author: Scriptural Research Institute

Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

ISBN: 9781989852446

Category: Religion

Page: 35

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The Book of Micah is generally considered one of the older surviving books of the Hebrew Scriptures, with most scholars dating it to before the Torah was compiled, or at least heavily redacted in the time of King Josiah. Most scholars accept that Micah was written by a prophet called Micah between 737 and 969 BC, who was most likely from the town of Moresheth in the Kingdom of Judea or the city-state of Gath, in the modern Palestinian West Bank. His world was very different from the later Kingdom of Judea that emerged in the 2nd-century BC, as the Israelites of his time were still polytheistic, worshiping the Canaanite Elohim, as well as statues of Iaw (Masoretic Yahweh), the God the Jews and Samaritans would later worship. The Book of Micah is believed to have been translated into Greek around 180 BC with other Twelve Prophets, however, there is a significant difference between the Septuagint's and Masoretic version of the Book of Micah. The Masoretic Version is the Book of Micah which copied by a group of Jewish scribes called the Masorites between 400 and 1000 AD. The major difference between the Books of Micah is the god that Amos was the prophet of. The Masoretic version refers to his god as Iaw (Yahweh) Sabaoth, however, the Septuagint's version of Micah does not mention Iaw Sabaoth, instead, referring to God as Lord God (κύριος ὁ θεὸς), or the Lord Almighty (κύριος ὁ παντοκράτωρ) which in the Septuagint's Book of Job was a translation of Shaddai. In the Septuagint, Micah's god was repeatedly named as 'Lord God' (κύριος ὁ θεὸς), which translated back into Hebrew would be 'Ba'al El,' and once Lord Almighty (κύριος ὁ παντοκράτωρ), which translated back into Hebrew would be 'Ba'al Shaddai.' The term pantocratôr (παντοκράτωρ) was the translation used in other books of the Septuagint for Shaddai (שדי). For example, the Book of Job, which was translated into Greek between 190 and 180 BC, the names Shaddi shows up 33 times in the Masoretic Texts and is translated as Almighty (παντοκράτωρ) in the Septuagint.

Book of Eve 5. Book of Adam ENOCH AND METATRON SERIES: 1. 1st Enoch: Book of the Watchers 2. 2nd Enoch: Book of Parables 3. 3rd Enoch: Astronomical Book 4. 4th Enoch: Dream Visions 5. 5th Enoch: Letter of Enoch 6. Secrets of Enoch 7.

Author: Scriptural Research Institute

Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

ISBN: 9781989852804

Category: History

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The Capture of Jaffa is a battle reported to have taken place during Thutmose III's reign, although is generally considered a fictionalized account, as it was found with a copy of The Doomed Prince which is considered ancient Egyptian fiction. How much of the Capture of Jaffa is considered fiction, and how much is historical has been a matter of debate, largely because of the similarities to Homer's account of the Battle of Troy. The surviving copy of this text was discovered on a papyrus scroll dating back the Ramesside Period, hundreds of years before Homer wrote the oldest surviving account of the Trojan War. Moreover, the Capture of Jaffa is set centuries before the Trojan War, and while there is a similar story of soldiers being hidden inside a tribute taken into the city, the stories are different overall. Moreover, given Capture of Jaffa appears to have been a popular enough story that it was being copied in Egypt at the time of the Trojan War, if the story of the wooden horse actually happened, the Achaeans may have gotten the idea from the Capture of Jaffa. The General that Thutmose III sent to Jaffa, General Thoth, did exist according to the contemporary records, and Jaffa was sacked by someone during the reign of Thutmose III. Therefore, some Egyptologists do view the Capture of Jaffa as a possibly accurate copy of a section of General Thoth's Biography. The fact that the general and his king were named, unlike the anonymous prince in the Doomed Prince, supports the idea that the story was originally part of a biography, as the Egyptians did not write stories about the dead, but they did copy stories that had been written while the dead were alive. As some Egyptologists have pointed out, the fact that the Habiru were mentioned supports the original text dating back to the time of Thutmose III, as the had Habiru disappeared from all other records after the Amarna Letters, circa 1350 BC. Thutmose III is considered one of Egypt's great conquerors, as he expanded the empire in all directions, as described in his biography. This was most likely overcompensation for the early years of his life, when he allowed his kingdom to be ruled by a woman, something clearly humiliating in the mindset of the ancient Egyptians. The Biography of Thutmose III was prepared by the High-Priest of Amen in Karnak, and is spoken from the view of God, in this case, the god Amen, who the Amen-worshipers viewed as the supreme God. As such, the author, God, takes credit for everything that Thutmose III did and essentially usurps any respect that Thutmose III's campaigns should have earned him, implying it was written shortly after his death. The biographies of ancient Egypt were essentially their obituaries carved in stone, intended to ensure the gods would never forget them, and they would live for eternity in the afterlife. As the Egyptians did not write history books, they are the closest thing we have to 'histories' of Egypt, and occasionally, such as in The Biography of Thutmose III, also include a comprehensive description of the Egyptian world, as, according to his biographer, all the world was subject to Thutmose III.

1st Enoch: Book of the Watchers 2. 2nd Enoch: Book of Parables 3. 3rd Enoch: Astronomical Book 4. 4th Enoch: Dream Visions 5. 5th Enoch: Letter of Enoch 6. Secrets of Enoch 7. Ascension of Moses 8. Revelation of Metatron TESTAMENTS OF ...

Author: Scriptural Research Institute

Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

ISBN: 9781989604182

Category: Religion

Page: 30

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The Penitence of Adam, also called the Penitence of our forefather Adam, is the Armenian version of the Life of Adam and Eve. The original version is believed to have been written in a Semitic language, as there as terms transliterated into Armenian from a Semitic language, however, it is not known positively which language as the original text is lost, and so far, no fragments have been found among the Dead Sea Scrolls that can be firmly linked to it. The closest text discovered to date among the Dead Sea Scrolls would be the Genesis Apocryphon scroll, written in Aramaic and generally dated to between 37 BC to 50 AD. The original language that the Penitence of Adam was translated from was likely also Aramaic, as demonstrated by the transliteration of the name Ovel (Ովէլ) in places were Uriel (Ուրիել) would normally be. A number of references circumstantially date the source-text used for the Greek version, known as the Apocalypse of Moses, to the era when the Greeks ruled Judea, between 330 and 140 BC, however, the source-text for the Latin and Armenian translation appears to have been older. One of the indicators that the source-texts for the Latin and Armenian translations are older than Greek, is the discrepancy between the 72 'strokes' and 70 'wounds' or 'griefs' that God sent to punish Adam. In the Apocalypse of Moses, there are 72, while in the Life of Adam and Eve and Penitence of Adam, there are 70, and these numbers are significant. The number 70 was very significant in the Canaanite and later Israelite (early-Samaritan) religions, however, it was changed to 72 in the Jewish religion for numerological reasons during the late-Persian and early-Greek eras. The number 70 does appear to have continued to be important among the Samaritans until the Hasmoneans virtually wiped them out in 113 BC, after which only the number 72 was used by Jews and Samaritans. This provisionally dates the text to the Persian era, between 525 and 330 BC, however, it could also be a Samaritan text dating to as late as 113 BC. Both the Latin Life of Adam and Eve, and the Armenian Penitence of Adam, also include the curious reference to 'powers' (virtutes / զաւրութիւնք) being present with the angels. This is generally accepted as proof that either the Latin or Armenian translation was influenced by the other, however, the other option is that something that both the Latin and Armenian translators chose to translate as 'powers' was already in the Semitic source-texts they were using. The obvious Hebrew term for them to have been translating was Elohim, which Jews have traditionally translated the term as 'powers' as it is a plural form, and Jews only worship one God. The Greek scholars that translated the Septuagint at the Library of Alexandria translated the word Elohim as either God or gods, depending on the context, however, there is no reason for the Latin or Armenian scholars to have been dependent on Greek translation norms when translating directly from Hebrew or Aramaic into Latin or Armenian. If the powers in the Latin and Armenian translations were the Elohim in the Semitic source-texts, then this would place the origin of the text to the Persian era at the latest, and almost certainly to the early-Persian era (525 to 330 BC), before Ezra the Scribe reformed Judaism, as there were two Elohim present, and therefore, these Elohim would have to date to the Samaritan priesthood from before the time of Ezra.

Book of Eve 5. Book of Adam ENOCH AND METATRON SERIES: 1. 1st Enoch: Book of the Watchers 2. 2nd Enoch: Book of Parables 3. 3rd Enoch: Astronomical Book 4. 4th Enoch: Dream Visions 5. 5th Enoch: Letter of Enoch 6. Secrets of Enoch.

Author: Scriptural Research Institute

Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

ISBN: 9781989852668

Category: Religion

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In the mid-3rd century BC, King Ptolemy II Philadelphus of Egypt ordered a translation of the ancient Hebrew scriptures for the Library of Alexandria, which resulted in the creation of the Septuagint, as well as several other books of Jewish and Samaritan scriptures, including the Book of Enoch, Book of Job, Testaments of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and the Dodeka. The Dodeka was not part of the collection of texts the Jews fleeing Egypt carried with them from the Jewish Temple in Elephantine, and is therefore believed to have been translated into Greek later, circa 180 BC. It would eventually be added to the Septuagint as the Book of Dodeka circa 140 BC, and then much later be divided into its twelve constituent books by the early Christians in the 3rd-century AD, subsequently called the twelve minor prophets. The books comprising the Dodeka all date from between 900 and 500 BC, and represent the works of twelve ancient prophets, which in the original Greek translation, represented several different gods. These were not Jewish prophets, but Israelite prophets, mostly living the age before King Josiah banned the old gods, in approximately 625 BC. Most of the books in the Dodeka were written before King Josiah's reforms. The books of Hosea, Amos, and Micah are set during the 8th-century BC, when the kingdom of Samaria fought a series of wars against its more powerful northern neighbor Assyria, ultimately being conquered by the Neo-Assyrian Empire circa 722 BC. The books of Joel, Obadiah, and Jonah follow, although their exact settings are not clear. The books of Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah follow, set in the 7th-century BC, as the Kingdom of Judea struggled for its survival between the powers of the time, Assyria to the north, Egypt to the south, and Babylon to the east, ultimately falling to the Neo-Babylonian Empire circa 586 BC. There is a gap in the prophets during the era when Babylon ruled Judea, and they continue with the books of Haggai, and the first half of Zachariah, set in the late-6th-century, after the Persians have conquered the Babylonian Empire. Combining the various Elohim that are appear to have been the text the Greeks translated, including Shaddai (Shaddayin), On (Aven), Dagon, Tirath (Tirosh), Yitzhar, Reshef (Blight), Mot, Hades (Sheol), and Abaddon (Destruction), Ba'al Hadad, Ba'al Hammon, Qetesh Asherah, Sydyk, and Shemesh, it strongly suggests that the text was heavily edited in the Hasmonean era when Yahweh Sabaoth replaced Lord El. Unfortunately, the existing Dead Sea Scrolls shed little light on the situation as they date to the era the edits would have taken place, but are in the script that should only show the edited version. Nevertheless, they are so damaged almost none of the questions about the differences between the Dodeka and Masoretic Texts could be resolved, even if they were in the Canaanite script.

Book of Eve 5. Book of Adam ENOCH AND METATRON SERIES: • 1st Enoch: Book of the Watchers • 2nd Enoch: Book of Parables • 3rd Enoch: Astronomical Book • 4th Enoch: Dream Visions • 5th Enoch: Letter of Enoch • Secrets of Enoch • Ascension ...

Author: Scriptural Research Institute

Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

ISBN: 9781990289156

Category: Religion

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The Book of Ezekiel is certainly one of the strangest books to survive from antiquity and has been the source of much speculation throughout centuries, by Jews, Christians, and atheists alike. Ezekiel's opening vision, of the flying machine, was the source of an entire branch of Jewish literature, Merkabah mysticism. Merkabah, which translates as 'chariot,' developed during the Second Temple era, and had a major impact on early Christian literature, although was ultimately abandoned by both Jews and Christians. The Christians abandoned the 'cloud literature' during the creation of orthodoxy, and the Talmud includes many interdictions concerning Merkabah speculation. Merkabah, and the Heikhalot literature that developed from it, ultimately fell out of favor in the 11th century AD. The Book of Ezekiel recounts a series of visions that Ezekiel had over the course of his life, in the late-600s and early-500s BC. Most of Ezekiel's prophecies were set during the rise of the Neo-Babylonian Empire, and his view of who the Israelites were, is fundamentally different than the view generally expressed. According to Ezekiel, the Israelites were Canaanites, the descendants of Amorites and Minoans (or Hittites in an alternate interpretation). This is clearly not the view that was popular in Judah, either when it was independent, or later under Babylonian or Persian rule. Several contradictions exist between the writings of Ezekiel and the Torah, which suggests that the Torah was not fully composed at the time, or if it was composed, not in circulation where Ezekiel lived. It is also a fact that Ezekiel did not mention Moses or Aaron, yet did refer to the Israelites leaving Egypt, which Moses and Aaron were central to. He mentioned Job and Noah, as well as the ancient Canaanite hero Danel, and Abraham, but under his older name Abram, suggesting that he had not read Genesis, in which Abram's name was changed to Abraham. The description of Ezekiel's thunder god, or his flying chariot, or his flying wheels, depending on the interpreter, is by far the strangest part of the book. It contains many references to electricity, which were generally omitted from early translations due to the belief that electricity was magical nonsense. The rediscovery of electricity in the early-modern era was largely based on the Classical Greek records of their experiments with amber, which is where William Gilbert derived the English term electricity from, êlectrou, meaning amber. The earliest surviving record of experimentation with electrostatic fields was by Thales of Miletus, who lived between approximately 624 and 548 BC, which is the same time as the life of Ezekiel, circa 630 to 545 BC. Ezekiel mentions the Greek city of Miletus in his books but does not mention visiting the place, nevertheless, there is no reason to assume Thales's experiments into static charges were the first, or unique at the time.

Book of Eve 5. Book of Adam ENOCH AND METATRON SERIES: • 1st Enoch: Book of the Watchers • 2nd Enoch: Book of Parables • 3rd Enoch: Astronomical Book • 4th Enoch: Dream Visions • 5th Enoch: Letter of Enoch • Secrets of Enoch • Ascension ...

Author: Scriptural Research Institute

Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

ISBN: 9781989852637

Category: Religion

Page: 35

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The Book of Malachi is the most curious and debated of the Books of the Twelve minor prophets, as the name Malachi (מלאכי) simply means 'angelic' in Hebrew, and the Greek translation used the word angel (ἀγγέλου) in the Septuagint. Most Jewish and Christian denominations do treat the word as the name of a prophet, however, the prophet Malachi was never mentioned by any other prophet or Ezra the scribe, and therefore some denominations consider the Book of Malachi to be an anonymous work, with the word Malachi simply referring to the angel of the lord. Early Jewish records from the late Persian era indicate that the Jews at the time considered the book of Malachi to have been written by Ezra the scribe, however, by the Greek era, the book was no longer attributed to Ezra. The date the book was written is also a matter of debate, as the book does not include any of the usual references to the political situation. Malachi does include two references that can be used to date the work, however, are generally ignored by scholars as they both date the book to the early 800s BC. The clearest reference was the prediction in chapter 4: "Look, I will send to you Elijah the Tishbite..." Elijah the Tishbite was the prophet Elijah from 3rd and 4th Kingdoms (Masoretic Kings), and 2nd Paralipomenon (Masoretic Diḇrê Hayyāmîm) whose live is dated to between 900 and 849 BC. The second reference is the general description of the state of Edom, which is described as having been defeated by the Judaeans. This matches the political reality of Elijah's time, when Edom was subject to the Kingdom of Judah, between 930 and 870 BC. Edom was a kingdom southeast of Judah from at least the 1200s BC until 125 BC when the Hasmonean dynasty conquered the kingdom. Edom was recorded as being a dependency of the Kingdom of Judah between 930 and 870 BC, but then rebelled against Judah, and does not appear to have been conquered outright by the Judeans again until the Hasmonean dynasty. These two references indicate the Book of Malachi was written between circa 880 and 870 BC, at the same time as the Book of Shadrach, which is embedded within the Book of Zachariah.

Book of Adam ENOCH AND METATRON SERIES: 1st Enoch: Book of the Watchers 2nd Enoch: Book of Parables 3rd Enoch: Astronomical Book 4th Enoch: Dream Visions 5th Enoch: Letter of Enoch Secrets of Enoch Ascension of Moses Revelation of ...

Author: Scriptural Research Institute

Publisher: Scriptural Research Institute

ISBN: 9781990289293

Category: History

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The life of Weni, also called Uni, is one of the best-documented lives from the era of the Old Kingdom era of Egyptian history. Weni experienced significant upward mobility during the reigns of kings Teti, Userkare, Pepi I, and Merenre I, and as a result had a second tomb prepared for himself later in life, resulting in two of his tombs surviving to the present. His tombs were not extravagant like the king's pyramids of the era, and seem to have generally been ignored until rediscovered in the 1800s. His earlier, smaller tomb included the shorter Inscription of Weni, sometimes called the Tomb Inscription of Weni, while his later, larger tomb included the longer Autobiography of Weni, also sometimes called the Inscription of Weni, or Tomb Inscription of Weni. The second, longer Autobiography of Weni is the longest surviving text from the Old Kingdom that is non-religious and provides a glimpse into the lives of the royal court, as well as the extent of the Old Kingdom's power within Nubia and Canaan. The older inscription is believed to date to late in the reign of King Pepi I, as Weni doesn't mention anything after the campaigns in Canaan. The larger inscription includes Weni's expeditions into Nubia for king Merenre I, who reigned after Pepi I, and provides a brief Egyptian description of Nubia during the Old Kingdom era. Weni's life spanned most of the 6th Dynasty of the Old Kingdom, which would have been at the peak of the Old Kingdom's international reach, but after the major pyramid building feats of the 5th Dynasty were completed. Egypt had already built the tallest building in the world decades before Weni had been born, which would continue to be the tallest building in the world for thousands of years, until the completion of the Eiffel Tower in 1889. The 6th Dynasty continued to build pyramids, however, none came close to the engineering accomplishments of the 5th Dynasty. One pyramid, which King Merenre I built, is mentioned prominently in the later section of the autobiography. It is believed to have been the Pyramid of Merenre at Saqqara, although it might have been a different pyramid for one of his wives.